Der Rittmeister Militaria, LLC. Imperial German Merchandise from the Gardes du Corps and More: Items from the Regiment der Gardes du Corps and the Jäger-Regiments zu Pferde. Updated on 27 June 2017.  Contact us @:kgreenfield@derrittmeister.com

 

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50-04 REGIMENT der GARDES du CORPS M-1904 KETTLE DRUM BANNER & BACKING PAD - PRUSSIA. This ultra rare banner was draped around the Gardes du Corps regimental band’s kettle drum. The very ornate item is the rarest article Der Rittmeister Militaria has offered, to date. The following anecdote reveals even more about the stunning "pièce de résistance."
On Monday, 30 May 1904, Kaiser Wilhelm II ordered the Imperial German Army’s premier cavalry regiment, the Gardes du Corps, to report to him prior to its Annual Spring Parade behind Potsdam’s Neues Palais (New Palace). The regiment formed up on Kurfürsten Street around six in the morning. Everyone was clad in their dress uniforms, including their kollers (tunics), Hohenzollern Eagle-topped metal helmets and Spring-Parade-ONLY black küraßes. [The latter originally were presented to the GdC by Russia’s Tsar Alexander I in appreciation of his Prussian allies’ efforts against Napoleon in 1815]. Led by their kettle drummer, Master Sergeant (Vizewachtmeister) Gommelt, the regimental band (conducted by its famous director, Louis Lehmann), and the rest of the formation moved out toward the Neues Palais. Gommelt was a large, knightly figure (then weighing 265 pounds), and the only soldier in the army permitted the high honor of wearing a full beard. As the regiment reached historic Mopke Platz [the parade grounds located between the Neues Palais and the Communs, two buildings that housed the GdC, other palace staff, and guests], they shifted into a "pass-in-review" formation. It was here that the Kaiser ordered Gommelt to enter the Neues Palais, where Wilhelm received him in a friendly, jesting manner. The Kaiser who greeted Gommelt with "Well, chubby, how are you doing?" followed by "How much are you weighing these days?"
After a brief conversation, the Kaiser informed Gommelt that he had a surprise for him. The surprise presented to Gommelt is one of the finest militaria items ever created: the final Regiment der Gardes du Corps’ kettledrum parade banner. It is one of TWO banners presented that day by the Kaiser to the German Army’s preeminent regiment (the other is in a private collection). The banner was created by Berlin’s famous royal embroidery firm, P. Bessert & Nettlebeck. The latter enjoyed a worldwide reputation as an exceptional uniform, church and artistic decorations producer. [It was equally well known for producing military flags and banners]. The drum banners were designed by Hermine Unterstein and stitched by Rudolf Thiele.
Our banner is approximately 60 inches wide and 14 inches high. The five upper panels are made of exquisite, poppy-red velvet, while the four lower and two half panels are made of white silk. Each panel is separated by embroidered, silver, arabesque designs that feature red tassels suspended by silk cords through an opening at their base. Each of the two outer panels displays a Prussian Eagle against a silver shield topped by a silver crown, and surrounded by an Order of the Black Eagle collar. [The Black Eagle Order is so expertly embroidered that at first glance one could mistake it for a true version of the order]! The embroidery is exquisitely detailed and the end panels’ use of color is simply incredible. The eagles’ wings are expertly shaded to suggest feathers and flight. A masterfully-rendered scepter and orb are accented by a yellow crown, as well as the eagle’s yellow talons and beak.
The next inner panel sets display large, beautifully-embroidered, highly-detailed Black Eagle Orders (Garde Stars) in their centers, with magnificent oak leaf clusters at the base. Their silver bullion is so expertly woven that the Garde Stars appear to be made of metal. The central panel features the Kaiser’s FWR (Friedrich Wilhelm Rex II) cypher. The cypher is embedded with small silver-toned beads/stones and topped by a silver crown, as are the other panels.
The banner is backed by poppy-red Moroccan leather, with Russian leather attachment straps. A deluxe pad that protected the banner when it was attached to the kettle drum is also included. The pad has straps to secure it (and the banner) to the kettle drum’s exterior.
This banner has been in private collections since it was offered by Berlin’s Oskar Scharbow auction firm in 1960. Once it is sold, the chances of it coming to light again within the next 50+ years are fairly slim. This ONCE-IN-A-LIFETIME offering crosses the collecting fields of Kaiser Wilhelm II and Garde-Regiments, specifically the Regiment der Gardes du Corps.
$ 95,000.00   REDUCED Special Price: $84,495.00
Price Reduction $75,995.00!! Final Price Reduction $65,995.00!!

 

 

 

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50-01 HERZOG ERNST AUGUST’S FELDGRAU INFANTERIE-REGIMENT Nr 92 GENERALMAJOR MANTEL (OVERCOAT) - BRAUNSCHWEIG. This is a mantel (overcoat) once owned by the Duchy of Braunschweig’s Herzog Ernst August (1887-1953). Ernst August was Braunschweig’s final Duke, who married Viktoria Luise (1892-1980), Kaiser Wilhelm II and Kaiserin Augusta Viktoria’s only daughter. [Braunschweig was the Kingdom of Hannover’s vassal state, until both were absorbed into Prussia following their defeat in the 1866 Austro-Prussian War. Braunschweig’s ducal succession was rather confused at the time. Otto von Bismarck stepped in to block the purported Hannover/Braunschweig next-in-line from ascending the throne. Instead, Prussia’s Prinz Albrecht (1837-1906) was named as Braunschweig’s regent, a role in which he served from 1885 to 1906. (Albrecht’s father was Wilhelm I and Friedrich Wilhelm IV’s brother). Prinz Albrecht had been a military officer, serving as the Hannover-based X. Armeekorps’ commander prior to his regency. Another Prussian took over the regency after Albrecht’s 1906 death. Following Ernst August’s 1913 marriage to Viktoria Luise (THE year’s social event and the European crowned heads’ last major gathering before WW I), Ernst August was allowed to become Braunschweig’s final Herzog. Braunschweig was then afforded greater independence, but remained a Prussian vassal state.
Young Ernst August was the Regimental Chef for his Duchy’s Husaren-Regiment Nr 17, a well as Infanterie-Regiment Nr 92. The Braunschweigisches Infantry Regiment Nr. 92 was founded in 1809. The regiment was garrisoned in the capital city of Braunschweig, and assigned to the X. Armeekorps. Braunschweigisches Infantry Regiment Nr. 92 possessed a fabled history. Among the battles and campaigns in which it participated were the 1808 Peninsular War (Spain and Portugal) against Napoleon under the Duke of Wellington, the battles of Waterloo and Quatre-Bras in 1815 (again with Wellington), and Mars La Tour during the 1870/71 Franco-Prussian War (attached to the 20th Division under General von Kraatz-Koschlau). During World War I, the 92nd Infantry Regiment fought at the battles of St. Quentin and the Marne on the Western Front and on the Eastern Front in the Gorlice-Tarnow Offensive and the Brusilov Offensive. The regiment, along with Hussar Regiment Nr. 17 and one battery of Feldartillerie Regt. von Scharnhorst (1. Hannoversches) Nr. 10,constituted the Duchy of Braunschweig’s entire military.
Our offering today is that very Duke’s feldgrau overcoat for Infanterie-Regiment Nr 92. We are very excited to offer a general officer’s rank coat that once belonged to a German HEAD-OF-STATE (the Kaiser’s son-in-law, no-less). The tunic is made of ultra-high-grade feldgrau wool. The coat is large and single-breasted, with a six-gilt-crowned button front and barrel cuffs. It features large, beautiful, generalmajor’s sewn-in shoulder boards (with red underlay) attached to the shoulders. They are sewn-in on one side, and attached by a small, crowned, gilt-toned button on the other. Its collar is a beautiful green on the inside and feldgrau on the outside. The overcoat’s reverse displays five small, burnished-gold buttons WITHOUT crowns. They can be fastened to the other side. A flap covers the buttonholes so they cannot be seen when buttoned. The coat’s interior displays a heavy, green, tufted-silk liner, with a small interior pocket on the right breast. The coat comes with the original wood hanger as it originally arrived from the auction (straight from Ernst August’s valet). The wood hanger retains the original sash hook. Its underside has the crowned initials "EA" branded into the hanger.
Both the interior and the exterior are in near-mint condition. It is in astounding condition for being more than one-hundred-years-old, with minor wear and a few minor moth nips. As mentioned with Ernst August’s paletot, listed below, the coat comes from the Royal House of Hanover sale that was conducted by Sotheby’s Auction House at Schloss Marienburg in 2005.
$4,995.00   
SPECIAL PRICE REDUCTION TO $3,995.00!!  Final Price Reduction $3,395.00!!

 

 

 

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50-02 HERZOG ERNST AUGUST’S HUSAREN-REGIMENT Nr 17 GENERALMAJOR PALETOT (OVERCOAT) - BRAUNSCHWEIG. This is a "paletot" (a loose or fitted overcoat, originally a medieval French term, later used in 19th Century Germany) once owned by the Duchy of Braunschweig’s Herzog Ernst August (1887-1953). Ernst August was Braunschweig’s final Duke, who married Viktoria Luise (1892-1980), Kaiser Wilhelm II and Kaiserin Augusta Viktoria’s only daughter. [Braunschweig was the Kingdom of Hannover’s vassal state, until both were absorbed into Prussia following their defeat in the 1866 Austro-Prussian War. Braunschweig’s ducal succession was rather confused at the time. Otto von Bismarck stepped in to block the purported Hannover/Braunschweig next-in-line from ascending the throne. Instead, Prussia’s Prinz Albrecht (1837-1906) was named as Braunschweig’s regent, a role in which he served from 1885 to 1906. (Albrecht’s father was Wilhelm I and Friedrich Wilhelm IV’s brother). Prinz Albrecht had been a military officer, serving as the Hannover-based X. Armeekorps’ commander prior to his regency. Another Prussian took over the regency after Albrecht’s 1906 death. Following Ernst August’s 1913 marriage to Viktoria Luise (THE year’s social event and the European crowned heads’ last major gathering before WW I), Ernst August was allowed to become Braunschweig’s final Herzog. Braunschweig was then afforded greater independence, but remained a Prussian vassal state.
The Braunschweigisches Husaren-Regiment Nr 17 was founded in 1809. The regiment was garrisoned in the capital city of Braunschweig, and assigned to the X. Armeekorps. Braunschweigisches Husaren-Regiment Nr 17 possessed a fabled history. Among the battles and campaigns in which it participated were: the Peninsula Campaign (Spain and Portugal) with Wellington, Waterloo (again with Wellington), and Mars La Tour, during the 1870/71 Franco-Prussian War. The regiment, along with Infanterie-Regiment Nr 92, and a single artillery Bataillon, constituted the Duchy of Braunschweig’s entire military. Young Ernst August was the Regimental Chef for his Duchy’s Husaren-Regiment Nr 17, a well as Infanterie-Regiment Nr 92.
Our offering today is that very Duke’s Braunschweigisches Husaren-Regiment Nr 17 paletot. We are very excited to offer a general officer’s rank coat that once belonged to a German HEAD-OF-STATE (the Kaiser’s son-in-law, no-less). The tunic is made of light-grey ultra-high-grade doeskin wool. It has the classic paletot’s double breasted front with two rows of six tombac buttons. A black turn-down collar with red underlay and beautiful general’s shoulder boards with black underlay denote Braunschweigisches Husaren-Regiment Nr 17. A generalmajor’s sewn-in shoulder boards are sewn-in on one side, and attached by a small, gilt-toned button on the other. The coat possesses false barrel cuffs with two deep flap pockets. The coat’s reverse features a short horizontal half belt with one connecting button. Below that, two vertical pockets with scalloped flaps on either side are decorated with six silver (three per side) buttons. The coat’s interior features a fine, champagne-colored, heavy-gauge silk liner with interior pockets. The coat itself shows aging and mothing (tracks and minor holes), mainly to its lower front section. Otherwise, it is in good condition.
This coat, along with the feldgrau overcoat above (also belonging to Ernst August) came from the Royal House of Hanover sale that was conducted by Sotheby’s Auction House at Schloss Marienburg, Germany, in 2005.
$3,995.00
   SPECIAL PRICE REDUCTION TO $3,195.00!!  Final Price Reduction $2,750.00.00!!

 

 

 

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50-05 ENLISTED MAN’S PRIVATELY-PURCHASED KÜRAßIER-REGIMENT Nr 2 KOLLER - PRUSSIA. It is an enlisted man’s Küraßier-Regiment Königin (Pommersches) Nr 2 "koller" (the regimental tunic for Prussian Küraßier or Jäger zu Pferde units). Küraßier-Regiment Königin (Pommersches) Nr 2 was among Prussia’s most-elite Küraßier-Regiments. It was founded in 1717, garrisoned at Pasewalk, and attached to the II. Armeekorps. Its Regimental Chef was the Kaiserin, Augusta Viktoria (1858-1921), who was also Königin of Prussia. [The Kaiserin’s eldest son, Kronprinz Wilhelm, was associated with the regiment as an à la Suite officer, as he was with 1. Leib-Husaren-Regiment Nr 1 and 1. Garde-Regiment zu Fuß]. The regiment displayed special emblems on its gilt-toned küraßes pertaining to battle honors granted it from a key battle in the 1745 War of Austrian Succession, 4 June’s Battle of Hohenfriedberg. [Frederick the Great led his Prussians against a large force of Austrians and Saxons at Hohenfriedberg. It was a total rout]. In addition to displaying the special devices on their küraßes, the regiment boasted bandeaux on their spiked helmets with the battle’s name and date. [The device featured a Hohenzollern Crown surrounded by regimental flags representing the sixty-seven Austrian and Saxon flags/standards captured at Hohenfriedberg.
As indicated above, the "koller" tunic style was worn ONLY by Küraßier and Jäger zu Pferde Regiments. The term referenced their tunics’ uniquely-shaped collars. [Another connection between the two regiment types was their extended-rear-visored metal helmets, which were designed to protect their wearers’ necks]. While the Gardes du Corps (GdC) was considered to be the Imperial German Army’s top-of-the-line unit, the Garde-Küraßier Regiment, along with the Leib-Küraßier-Regiment Großer Kurfürst (Schlesisches) Nr 1, and Küraßier-Regiment Königin Nr 2, were all close behind. The tunic is made of fine white wool and features the special "küraßier collar." A double row of red trim bands extends down the tunic’s center from its collar to its hem. A fascinating feature of küraßier tunics is that they do NOT employ buttons to close their tunic fronts. Instead, a series of hooks and eyes are concealed beneath the central trim bands, joining the tunic’s two halves underneath a smooth exterior.
The koller’s cuffs display red trim bands accented with white litzen, each of which boasts a silver-toned button. The white shoulder straps are trimmed in red, and feature a crowned royal cypher ("L") on each strap. The tunic’s right sleeve sports an inverted red "V," indicating that the wearer had qualified for Lance Proficiency 3rd Class. Outlines of two former "V’s" are still present, probably from earning other, lower proficiency awards.
The tunic’s reverse displays red trim bands extending down to the vent flap. The vent flap itself is decorated by six silver-toned buttons. No depot markings are evident inside the tunic, meaning it was privately-purchased (even enlisted members of elite regiments frequently did this). The liner is made of white silk that is in excellent condition. A name is very faintly penciled into its collar, but I cannot decipher it.
Overall, the tunic is in very good condition. Some scattered moth tracks and moth nips show on its front and back. Due to its white color, some soiling is present. It remains a VERY difficult-to-find tunic in more than acceptable condition.
$2,795.00    
SPECIAL PRICE REDUCTION TO $3,195.00!!  Final Price Reduction $1,995.00!!

 

 

 

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50-09 REGIMENTAL FAHNENTRÄGER PREWAR SLEEVE DEVICE/PATCH FOR KÜRAßIER KOLLER - PRUSSIA. One of the most honored positions within any regiment was the assignment to carry and maintain its regimental standard. All of the European armies, (including Germany), had fascinating traditions with regimental standards. In Germany, regimental banners or standards were authorized and issued by the König, or Kaiser. It had a true pageantry to it. In addition to the actual standard/banner, regiments brandished flagpoles adorned with streamers proclaiming the year of the regiment’s establishment, the regiment’s collective battle honors, and brass identification rings. Depending on the regiment, the pole might be topped by a Grand Cross of the Iron Cross. The men fought with great pride under these flags. For a regiment to lose its flag in battle was a horrible event. It rained dishonor on ALL the men attached to the regiment, from its regimental commander down to the lowliest private.
The man assigned to maintain and carry the regimental banner was highly-regarded by his officers and NCO’s. He bore the standard, carrying it in a special case when it was not unfurled. He was expected to protect the banner with his life. The sight of the banner waving, even in battle, was a rallying point for the regiment’s men. If the color bearer fell during battle, another man immediately snatched-up the banner to show that the regiment was still in the fight. Naturally, a man so honored as to carry the regimental colors was awarded a special sleeve patch designating him as the regimental color bearer. In addition, he wore a shorter sword to lighten his load and to give him more flexibility marching and in battle.
It is easy to see that the number of German Army color bearers was very limited, as was the very special sleeve patch. This particular patch was worn on a küraßier’s pre WW I white/cream-colored, kersey wool, dress koller sleeve. The shield-shaped patch measures 3 ½" x 5." It sports a pair of crossed regimental flags, beautifully done in yellow, white, and black thread. Between the flags is a Hohenzollern Crown made of yellow, white, and red thread. Kaiser Wilhelm II’s yellow royal cypher appears at the patch’s bottom. It is very elegant and quite rare, as only ten (eight plus two Garde) Küraßier-Regiments existed in the German Army.
[As an aside, regimental banners are greatly prized by collectors. Prices BEGIN at $20,000 for these beauties, WHEN they come on the market. Some examples fetch in excess of $50,000. They rarely become available. Many of them were taken to Russia at WW II’s end, and not released until thirty to forty years later]. This patch is an amazing piece of history.
$2,295.00   
SPECIAL PRICE REDUCTION TO $1,795.00!!  Final Price Reduction $1,525.00!!

 

 

 

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50-08 REGIMENT der GARDES DU CORPS VETERANS’ GROUP STANDARTEN/FAHNENTRÄGER’S (FLAG BEARER) RINGKRAGEN (GORGET) - PRUSSIA. This is a special post WW I Regiment der Gardes du Corps veterans’ group flag bearer ‘s ringkragen (gorget). Veterans’ groups were very popular in Germany, both before and after WW I. Many such groups met in cities and towns all over Germany. These groups were all-encompassing, being regional as well as regimental in nature. They all produced various memorabilia for their member, from something as simple as badges to much more complex steins, pipes, flasks and flags. Large, elaborately-embroidered banners were displayed on walls, or carried as flags in marches, much like the regimental and national colors carried at a regiment’s head when on parade. Smaller banners often were mounted for display on a desk or podium, or attached to musical instruments. The man selected to bear an active army unit’s or veterans’ group’s colors was known as the Fahnenträger (standard-bearer). This man wore a ringkragen (gorget), a shield suspended from a chain. It was hung around his neck (the shield rested on his chest). It is also important to note that a Fahnenträger wore a special patch on his tunic sleeve called a "kragenspiegel."
Today we are offering a ringkragen from a 1920’s Regiment der Gardes du Corps veterans’ group, rather than an active military unit’s example. The ringkragen’s body is nickel-plated and topped by a gilt arrangement (consisting of four flags/banners) surrounding a central oval that rests on scattered laurel leaves. It measures 5 ½" x 6." The oval’s center features a 1914 Iron Cross. Engraved above the gilt arrangement are the words "Kvd (Kriegs verein dienst) Gardes du Corps," "while "Potsdam" is engraved below the central decoration. The neck chain is typical of those on period standarten/fahnenträger ringkragens, with the alternating decorative round and oval links. The chain is connected to the gorget by two decorative gilt buttons. One side is permanently attached, while the other button attaches by a hook that allows the chain to be easily removed or put on by its wearer. The central hook can be placed into a tunic buttonhole or seam in order to stabilize it on the wearer, preventing it from swinging back and forth while marching or riding.
The hook’s back is marked "Ges. Gesch." (Gesetzlich Geschützt = protected by law, patented, copyrighted). The ringkragen’s back is covered with feldgrau material. The item is in excellent condition, and comes in its original red cardboard box that measures 1 ½" x 6" x 6." Two paper wrapper pieces are included. It is a very rare veteran’s offering for one of the Imperial German Army’s premier regiments!
$1,995.00  
SPECIAL PRICE REDUCTION TO $1,595.00!!  Final Price Reduction $1,295.00!!

 

 

 

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50-24 REGIMENT der GARDES DU CORPS FELDGRAU M-1910 LEUTNANT’S SHOULDER BOARDS. This is a rare pair of Regiment der Gardes du Corps leutnant’s M-1910 feldgrau shoulder boards used during WW I. The regiment was founded by Friedrich der Große in 1740. It was garrisoned in Potsdam and attached to the Gardekorps. These boards are of the sewn-in variety. The boards sport the Regiment Gardes du Corps’ double underlay of red and white. They display Prussia’s wartime (M-1910) grey tops with black and white chevrons. The pair is in excellent condition! $995.00    SPECIAL PRICE REDUCTION TO $795.00!!   Final Price Reduction $695.00!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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50-22 REGIMENT der GARDES du CORPS LEUTNANT’S SHOULDER BOARDS. This is a pair of Regiment Gardes du Corps leutnant’s shoulder boards. The Regiment was founded in 1740 by Friedrich der Große. It was garrisoned in Potsdam and attached to the Gardekorps. These boards are of the slip-on variety, which is more unusual for a leutnant. They were typically found, however, on coats such as the waffenrock or litewka. More commonly, they came in the sewn-in type board. The boards sport the Regiment Gardes du Corps’ double underlay of red and white. They display prewar silver bullion tops with Prussia’s black chevrons. The pair was tied together in storage. The board that was stored on top shows darkened areas on the bullion where the string was attached. Otherwise, they are in very good condition. $895.00   SPECIAL PRICE REDUCTION TO $695.00!!   Final Price Reduction $495.00!!

 

 

 

 

 

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50-27 XRK GERMAN LANGUAGE BOOK - REGIMENT GARDES du CORPS 1740 - 1890. This is a consignment item. The small book details the Garde du Corps’ history from 1740 until 1890. In addition to a brief regimental history, the book even lists officers who served from 1745 to 1890. [The latter information was taken from the GdC’s official Ranglisten over those years]. The book goes even further, listing the Regiment’s enlisted men and NCO’s, as well as casualties from conflicts. I even saw a list of decorations from 1807 (BEFORE the Iron Crosses 1st and 2nd Class) extended though the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian War. It is a fine, compact book that will be helpful for researching the regiment’s history, as well as those of the men who served in it. $125.00  Final Price Reduction $95.00!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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50-37 XRK FLAGPOLE TOPPER FOR REGIMENT der GARDE du CORPS VETERANS’ GROUP. This is a consignment item. Veterans’ groups played a large part in the lives of veterans after they had completed their military service. Sometimes these groups were organized on a regional or citywide basis to include ALL veterans regardless of the regiment in which they had originally served. It comes as no surprise, then, that the most well known and elite veterans’ organization was that for the Regiment der Gardes du Corps.
Veteran groups had flags produced to represent their regiments/groups. At the meetings, the banner for their regiment/organization was proudly displayed. The banner was attached to a flagpole that usually had a topper attached it. The flag/banner along with the personalized topper (often an Iron Cross was part it) completed the presentation. It was featured at the front of the room, or
displayed at the head of the group when they were on parade.
As the Regiment der Gardes du Corps was the Imperial German Army’s most elite regiment, it was only fitting that the topper for THEIR banner was the emblematic crowned Hohenzollern Eagle with outspread wings. When mounted on a gleaming golden helmet, these Eagles made for a very impressive sight.
Our offering is that same Hohenzollern Eagle, but attached to a ball. It weighs 3 lbs., 9 oz. and is 10 ½" tall. The ball’s bottom has a pipe extending down that allowed it to be slipped into a flagpole. The Eagle looks fairly close in size to the Eagles used on their helmets, however, its detailing is NOT as crisp as those Eagles. So, PLEASE do NOT try to use it on a helmet! The results will be totally UN-satisfactory.
Do remember that this almost a one-of-a-kind item that would make an important and very useful addition to any collection.
$1,995.00  Final Price Reduction $1,695.00!!

 

 

 

 

 

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50-38 POST WW I COMMEMORATIVE SILVER PLATE FOR REGIMENT der GARDES du CORPS NCO. This is a consignment item. It is a lovely silver plate to a Regiment der Garde du Corps Wachtmeister. The plate is dated 1.10.1927, some nine or ten years after his service in the regiment. The plate measures 11" in diameter. The edges are scalloped to give it character. In the center is a crowned cypher that appears to be GdC (not what they used during the Imperial German Period, but by 1927, who knows?). The date appears directly below it. Text circling the plate’s outer section reads "Dem letzten etatmäßigen Wachtmeister des Regts. Gardes du Corps" (The last regular Watch Master of the Regiments [der] Gardes du Corps) across the top, "Die Traditions-Schwadron" (The Traditional Squadron) across the bottom.
The obverse displays a number of problem areas, with a great deal of small scratches scattered across its surface. Several distinct smudges also affect the plate’s bottom third. The plate’s reverse features the half moon and Hohenzollern Crown silver hallmarks as mandated by Kaiser Wilhelm I in 1885, as well as a .800 silver hallmark. These are followed by a hallmark for the jewelry firm that produced it, "D. GADEBUSCH." [The Potsdam jewelry firm was founded in 1844. It was moved to Cologne (Köln) after WW 2, where it remains in business to this day].
While the condition is not quite what we prefer, please remember that it is nearly ninety-years-old and has been through a lot before coming to us. The subject matter is interesting and the plate still displays well.
$295.00  Final Price Reduction $195.00!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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50-48 XRK REGIMENT der GARDES du CORPS ENLISTED MAN PALLASCH. This is a consignment item. Keeping in mind that men from Küraßier-Regiments were considered heavy cavalry who initially wore Küraße in combat, it is not hard to understand why they would use such a heavy sword. The pallasch is distinguished by its large basket-hilt that afforded greater protection for a man’s hand while engaged in hand-to-hand combat.
It is a massive sword in every respect and very much reminds me (in terms of size) of Otto von Bismarck’s Küraßier sword on display in the eponymous museum dedicated to the Iron Chancellor. [The museum is located on part of the von Bismarck family estate in Aumühle, district of Lauenburg, Schleswig-Holstein, in Hamburg’s outskirts]. The museum display is von Bismarck’s uniform complete with high Küraßier boots, and a monumental sword. I was quite taken by von Bismarck’s size. I stand six feet tall and his sword comes up to my lower chest. After holding and measuring this sword, I think its original owner was of equal size to von Bismarck. After all, the Regiment der Gardes du Corps recruited the most physically imposing specimens that could be found in Prussia. These men who were often 6' 5" or taller, and stood nearly seven feet tall when wearing their boots and Hohenzollern Eagle-topped helmets.
When sheathed, this sword measures 46 ¼" from its top to the scabbard’s bottom drag, and when unsheathed, it measures 44 ½" from blade tip to pommel top. Its 39 ½" nickel scabbard displays two rings for attachment to its wearer’s sword belt. Its wooden grip is coated with a hard plasticized covering and triple-brass-wire-wrapped. It sports a high-quality brass basket hilt. A series of hallmarks appears on one portion of the basket hilt’s edge, as well as the number "602." The sword blade is plain and sports two blood gutters. The blade’s condition and that of the entire sword is quite pleasing.

 

 

 This is an impressive sword. I seriously doubt you will easily locate one as large. $1,195.00  Final Price Reduction $950.00!!

 

 

 

 

 

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50-49 XRK REGIMENT der GARDE du CORPS OFFICER’S SCHIRMMÜTZE. This is a consignment item. It is a Regiment der Garde du Corps officer’s Schirmmütze. It is the tall elegant prewar style (NOT feldgrau). Its body is made of a superior-quality white wool. A wide red trim band measuring 1 ¾" sits above the black visor. The latter shows some signs of wear and some breaks in the black lining material. The cap front’s center features the correct Reich and State officer’s kokarden. A single narrow red trim band encircles the cap’s top. The exterior shows some signs of minor soiling and age, with some very small moth tracks. They have not bloomed into full-blown moth nips. One must look carefully to see them.
The interior reveals a well-used brown leather sweatband that shows some cracks. The interior visor is brown. The cap’s golden/wheat-colored liner is a treated fabric (oilcloth) that repels moisture and lessens hair oil stains.
 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a decent visor cap, although not a great one. It is still quite attractive and desirable coming from such an elite regiment. $950.00  Final Price Reduction $850.00.!!

 

 

 

 

 

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50-50 XRK REGIMENT der GARDE du CORPS NCO’S SCHIRMMÜTZE. This is a consignment item. It is a Regiment der Garde du Corps NCO’s Schirmmütze. Instead of a tall peaked look, this man preferred the cavalry’s popular "crusher" style. The latter was accomplished by removing much of the cap’s interior stiffening. Some officers removed all of it so they could roll their cap up and stick it in a jacket or back pocket. Manfred von Richthofen did so (I have held one of his Schirmmützen in my hands, and that was how it looked). The cap is prewar, so its body is made of top-quality white wool (NOT feldgrau). A wide red trim band measuring 1 ¾" sits above the black visor, which has a crusher’s crinkled appearance. The cap front’s center features the correct Reich and State officer’s kokarden. A single narrow red trim band encircles the cap’s top. The exterior displays some scattered moth nips and moth tracking (NOT a large amount). The latter are not detractive to the cap’s overall appearance.
The interior reveals a gently-used brown leather sweatband. Its interior visor displays a great deal of staining. Its rough silk liner is ivory in color. The initials "A. E. N." are stamped on the silk liner beneath a crown.

 

 

 

 

This is the first GdC NCO’s Schirmmütze that I have offered, and it has a wonderful appearance. The man wearing it must have looked jaunty! $750.00  Final Price Reduction $625.00.00!!

 

 

 

 

 

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50-53 XRK REGIMENT der GARDE du CORPS ENLISTED MAN/NCO’S OVERSIZED FRAMED PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPH. This is a consignment item. It is an oversized photograph of an enlisted man/NCO wearing the Regiment Garde du Corps dress koller. The koller was the special tunic worn by the officers and men serving in Küraßier or Jäger zu Pferde Regiments. The uniforms worn by these regiment types boasted unique collars that were unlike any others within the Imperial German Army.
The GdC’s parade (dress) koller was white with red trim. For a special effect, the photo has been enhanced with hand-painted colors. Its subject sports a (red) Supravest, a garment unique to the Regiment der Gardes du Corps, pulled over his tunic. A large, predominately white Garde Star decorates the vest’s front. He is wearing a red and white sash, and sports three red chevrons for the highest lance proficiency on his sleeve. The young trooper even boasts a Kaiser Wilhelm II style mustache!
The silver-toned frame measures 9" x 11 ½." The photo within the frame measures 5 ¾" x 8 ¼." This is gorgeous depiction of a proud young man from Imperial
Germany most elite regiment. $195.00  Final Price Reduction $150.00!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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15-674 XAS OFFICER’S LINE-KÜRAßIER-REGIMENT KÜRAß. This is a consignment item. It is a high quality officer’s küraß for a Prussian Line-Küraßier-Regiment. Küraßiers were considered the German Army’s heavy cavalry. They harkened back to when cavalrymen dashed madly across battlefields to fight enemy cavalry and infantry units. The Küraßiers heyday reigned from the 18th Century through the early 19th Century’s Napoleonic Wars. Their usefulness gradually diminished as firearms and artillery became more sophisticated and the 19th Century evolved into the 20th. The same was true of Germany’s other Kavallerie units, which included Ulanen, Dragoner, Husaren, and Chevauleger Regiments. While their tactical usefulness diminished, their ceremonial value greatly increased with the German Empire’s 1871 formation. The Küraßier Regiments took pride of place during this time, particularly Prussia’s Regiment der Gardes du Corps (GdC) and Saxony’s Garde-Reiter-Regiment, both of which displayed elaborate uniforms and headdress.
Five Prussian Army Line-Küraßier-Regiments wore küraßes like the example we are offering today. It features a simple silver-toned finish along with certain gold-toned fittings such as bolts, circular adornments, and the nipple posts to which its securing belts are attached. The securing belts are particularly important, and are attached to the shoulder tops of the küraß’s back section. [The belts themselves greatly resemble an officer’s pickelhaube chinstraps with their individual, overlapping metal scales]. A high-relief ornamental lion’s head within a shield appears just behind the actual attachment device. Once they are secured by the attachment device, the belts are then laid over the wearer’s shoulders to be secured to the corresponding posts on the küraß’s front section. The belts sport very ornate attachment plates with "keyholes" that are secured around the front section’s nipple post attachments. Laurel leaves adorn the attachment plates in very elegant patterns.
The interiors of the küraß’s two sections are lined with padded white cotton for extra protection and comfort. The cotton also helped absorb perspiration. [One can well imagine that wearing a wool koller under a küraß would make its wearer VERY warm in summertime, in addition to the metal pickelhaube with its long lobstertail protecting his neck! At least a Line-Küraßier-Regiment officer did not have to wear the GdC’s heavy eagle on top of his helmet, which would have added more weight to the equation].
All in all, it is a fine example of an officer’s küraß. The küraß’s front sports two areas of tarnish/patina from decades of NOT being cleaned (as an officer’s aid would have done). These appear near the gold-toned nipple post attachments. Another small defect turns up about three inches above the left nipple post (from the wearer’s standpoint). It looks like the küraß was struck by something heavy enough to damage a bit of the silver-toned surface. The actual damage is diagonal and about one inch in length. The küraß’s rear half does not display any damage, but does sport a substantial patina from age. We are very pleased to share this handsome piece with you today.
[Here is one final bit of information to share with you. The consignor is a longtime, very experienced collector. His collection still houses other küraßes, including a black spring-parade GdC küraß. He tells us the Line-Küraßier-Regiment küraß is absolutely the largest one that he has ever encountered. Due to its weight and value, extra shipping costs will be necessary]. $7,995.00 PRICE REDUCED TO $6795.00 2nd Price Reduction: $6,495.00

 

 

 

 

 

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15-675 XAS KÜRAßIER-REGIMENT Nr 4 OFFICER’S DRESS KOLLER AND SASH - PRUSSIA. This is a consignment item. It is an officer’s Küraßier-Regiment von Driesen (Westfälisches) Nr 4 dress tunic (koller), which was worn at formal affairs and parades. The regiment was founded in 1717 and garrisoned at Münster, where it was attached to the VII. Armeekorps.
Küraßier
and Jäger zu Pferde’s dress tunics were unlike those of all the other troops, even those from other Kavallerie Regiments (the Ulanen’s ulankas and the Husaren’s attilas). The difference lies in the Küraßier and Jäger zu Pferde’s collar design and the way its decorative trim is arranged. The trim (in regimental colors) is used on the koller’s front, collar and cuffs, and is referred to as borte (border). When you look at the photos that accompany this selection, you will note that the collar and its trim are rounded from the collar’s upper section to the midpoint where it flows down into the borte decorating the koller’s front. You will also notice that the koller has NO visible buttons on its front. Instead, the borte conceals a hook and eye system beneath it so that the tunic front presents a smooth appearance once everything is secured. It is an extremely elegant design.
The koller is made of fine white wool. The each tunic half’s front sports the previously-mentioned, regimentally-correct, red and silver bullion borte running from collar-to-bottom down its center edge. Furthermore, the same borte adorns each cuff, along with two silver-toned buttons on each sleeve.
The koller comes with two correct, very fine epaulettes. Each epaulette sports a silver and black bullion passant across its tongue where it attaches to the half-moon. [A passant is the small shoulder strap that runs parallel to the tunic’s shoulder seam to attach an epaulette to the uniform]. The latter may indicate that the wearer retired from the regiment as a Leutnant der Reserve. The metal fittings (moons) are silver-toned, while the epaulettes’ centers display the same unadorned white wool as the tunic. The epaulettes’ backing is red. The epaulettes are in excellent condition. Thin red piping traces a design on the koller’s reverse that descends from the shoulder seams down the back to the waistline, then onto the vent area to accent the six plain silver buttons on display. The same red piping accents each sleeve back from the shoulder seam to the cuff’s borte.
The tunic’s interior displays a rather unusual padded design covered with silk. This silk has suffered some shredding, especially in the top center. A bit more shredding is visible in the vent area. Some black numbers and letters are visible on the interior tunic sleeve and just below the shredding in the top center. [I believe these are postwar costume house marks. Many Great War tunics made their way into costume houses for the theater and burgeoning film industries in Europe and the USA. I once had a tunic that was marked for a Los Angeles, California costume house, including a six-digit telephone number! (U.S. telephone numbers did not convert to the current seven digits until after WW II)].
A silver-toned brocade dress sash (in very fine condition) is included with the koller. The tunic’s overall condition is quite pleasing. Even though white material often does not age well, this tunic has NOT suffered extensive soiling. It is an excellent representation of its kind.
$2,995.00 Price Reduced to $2,495 

 

 

 

 

 

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15-676 XAS KÜRAßIER-REGIMENT OFFICER’S CARTRIDGE BELT AND BOX - PRUSSIA. This is a consignment item. It is an excellent example of a Küraßier-Regiment officer’s silver-toned belt and black leather cartridge box. The belt sports an oval-shaped, silver-toned buckle. The belt’s tip and its keeper are also silver-toned. The belt’s front displays gray and silver bullion, while its back is red. The belt measures 50" in length, and the cartridge box measures 3 ½" x 5." Its leather is in fine condition. The box front sports a brass royal cypher beneath a fine brass Prussian Crown. It would make an excellent addition to a tunic or as a collection display piece. $995.00   Price Reduced to $850.00

 

 

 

 

 

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15-670 XAS HUSAREN REGIMENT OFFICER’S BELT WITH ORIGINAL STORAGE CARTON - PRUSSIA. This is a consignment item. Today we are offering a wonderful Prussian Husaren Regiment Officer’s parade belt. It is a very hard-to-find accessory worn by Prussian Husaren officers on dress occasions. The belt features stone-mint brown leather attachments at either end for securing the belt. The belt itself consists of many thin braided silver and black-chevroned bullion strings that are threaded through three sets of braided silver bullion tubes. [The tubes, which number five per set, are securely threaded together]. An aiguillette-like section is attached by its braided rosette between two of tube sections. The "aiguillette" itself consists of two thicker silver bullion cords that encircle the looped-together strings near one of the leather fasteners. The aiguillette’s OTHER end features two portépée-like devices made of bullion and coiled silver-toned tinsel, which hang down from the rosette opposite to the aiguillette’s cords. A white silk lining is attached to the belt’s reverse behind the tube sets and the aiguillette’s rosette. It is intact, but shows some minor soiling. The belt measures 30 ½" when fully lengthened.
The belt has been housed in its original storage carton over all these years. The carton measures 8" in diameter. Both carton halves are in excellent condition. Its original one-hundred-year-old tissue paper lines the carton’s bottom. This explains the belt’s superb condition!
It is a mint-condition Husaren officer’s belt. You could search for years and find none better. Even in a lesser condition, it is an accouterment that seldom turns up.
[As an extra incentive, we will add a handsome discount on any Prussian Officer’s Attila in our inventory if you purchase the pair together]. $2,395.00  PRICE REDUCED TO $1,995.00  2nd Price Reduction: $1,795.00

 

 

 

 

 

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33-322 XAS HUSAREN-REGIMENT Nr 7 OFFICER’S BUSBY IN FULL PARADE CONFIGURATION WITH TWO STORAGE CONTAINERS - PRUSSIA. This is a consignment item, a truly amazing Husaren-Regiment Nr 7 officer’s busby. What sets it apart from so many others is its condition. Often, an antique headdress has remained in such excellent shape due to the way it has been stored. This particular busby has TWO storage cases, one for the helmet itself and the other for its parade feathers. These have kept everything in as near-to-mint condition as possible. [I continue to preach the importance of condition because that, dear friends, is what distinguishes a first-rate collection from the merely run-of-the-mill. In my opinion, ONE excellent item easily trumps TEN average pieces. Junk never improves with age, while top-quality items provide great short-term enjoyment AND increase in value as the years go by]!
This very tasty officer’s busby comes from Husaren-Regiment König Wilhelm I. (1. Rheinisches) Nr 7. The regiment was created in 1815, close to the Napoleonic Wars’ end at the Battle of Waterloo. The regiment was garrisoned at Bonn (West Germany’s former capital prior to Germany’s reunification and Berlin’s restoration as the governmental seat). As a Prussian Regiment, it was attached to the Prussian VIII. Armeekorps.
The busby dates to around 1900, meaning it sports rich, chocolate otter fur rather than the later-mandated light-gray opossum fur. Both furs are very lovely and desirable. Quite frankly, when the fur is in such good condition, it is simply a matter of personal preference.
As I hold this gem in my hands, I am awed that something more than one-hundred-years-old age is so perfect. I can’t help but stroke that fur and feels its softness. [My beloved cats might get jealous, because as cuddly as they are, their fur cannot quite match the otter fur’s softness]! The busby shows absolutely NO loss of fur on its body (again, perfection). The gilt-toned wappen displays Prussian König (later Kaiser) Wilhelm I’s royal cypher. The legend "Mitt-Gott-Für-Koenig-Und- Vaterland" appears below the crowned cypher. The wappen’s frosting is absolutely gorgeous. Its rounded cavalry-style chin scales exhibit an age and patina that confirm they have not been cleaned in decades. The chin scales are pinned in the "UP" position on either side of the Feldzeichen (Field Badge). [Made of concentric silver bullion rings encircling a black velvet center, the Feldzeichen confirms that this busby is meant for a Prussian officer. Feldzeichen were color-coded to allow easy recognition of the state or kingdom from which they hailed]. Busbies’ wappens and Feldzeichen provided this quick identification, because they did NOT sport a state kokarde. Only the Reich’s kokarde was displayed on the busby’s right side, as it is on this example.
The busby’s top has a correct red kolpak. The kolpak is in excellent condition, with only minor soiling and NO mothing. [One small detail: the kolpak can be removed from the busby. Once pulled out, one sees it is fashioned from red silk underneath! Nobody would ever know this but the owner and his batman]. Cap lines are attached to the kolpak’s top and flow down its right side where the kolpak itself extends down and over to the left.
The busby’s final exterior detail is its parade feathers. [They really make this piece "sing"]! The very slender, black and white (Prussia’s state colors) feathers are, I believe, from a heron. They are attached to a metal clip that slips behind the Feldzeichen. When in place, they make for a showy presentation. The feathers inclusion means this is an absolutely complete busby with all of its accouterments.
The interior features a high leather sweatband with partial white stitching around it. The stitching is not complete and several of the holes display none of the stitches. This is the only flaw that I can find and in display you will never notice it. The very slight amount of sweat staining shows the busby was gently worn. A busby-style beige silk liner is attached to the sweatband, and is in MINT condition as well.
The busby’s containers have kept this magnificent example of Hussar headdress in pristine condition. Typically, Imperial German headdress containers/storage boxes were made of cardboard. They were high-quality cardboard, but cardboard nevertheless, whether for the busby or the parade feathers. I am told by this item’s consignor that the British preferred a METAL container for their busbies and some other headdress forms. Obviously, the latter afforded the items greater protection. It appears that our German officer felt the same way, because he chose metal containers for his busby and feathers in that same style.
The oval-shaped metal busby container measures 10" x 10." It is painted black and sports a flip-closure mechanism. The painted exterior has some scratches and dings to its surface, but the container did its job protecting the busby inside. The parade feathers’ container is a metal tube that measures 14 ½" in length and 1 ½" in circumference. Again it is painted black, with some scars on its painted exterior. The feathers inside, however, are little different than the day the officer picked up the entire set from his military effects shop.

 


If you have wanted to add a busby to your collection, you will NOT find a better example than this one. It is simply unupgradeable. $9,995.00 Price Reduced to $8,495.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

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