Der Rittmeister Militaria, LLC. Imperial German Merchandise, Page 0: Just in From Germany, the newest items fresh from the Fatherland!  Updated on 1 September 2017.  
Contact us @:kgreenfield@derrittmeister.com

Click here for Links to our Merchandise & Content Pages. This is just a sample of  the wide variety of high quality items that we offer in our ever changing inventory!

 

 

ATTENTION!

If you want to be on our mailing list,  please send us an e-mail and ask to be placed on it. We notify our mail list members when we update our online "Just In From Germany" Merchandise Page. In addition, you will receive early notification when we add new items to any clearance pages (currently under revision). More importantly, we notify our list members when we have a sale. These sales are NEVER announced on our web site. They are for our list members ONLY. Be assured that we never sell or share your e-mail address with anyone. The list is only for our purposes as stated above.

Our e-mail address follows: kgreenfield@derrittmeister.com

 

Next Update:  10 October 2017

Our business phone number in the USA: 001 (727) 233-6173

 

 

04-738 MECKLENBURG-SCHWERIN - PICKELHAUBE - GENERAL OFFICER’S WITH SERVICE SPIKE AND PARADE FEATHERS. Der Rittmeister Militaria has offered some very rare Imperial German headdresses over the years, such as some stunning pieces that once belonged to Kaiser Wilhelm II and various royal German princes. We have also offered Prussian, Bavarian, Württemberg, Saxon Generals’ pickelhauben, as well as one from Mecklenburg-Schwerin. The Prussian, Bavarian, Württemberg, Saxon spiked helmets included their parade feathers mounted to trichters. The sole example from Mecklenburg-Schwerin (some ten to fifteen years ago) was a late war example that only included its service spike. It was a good, but hardly spectacular, helmet. Today, however, our luck has changed! Without a doubt, this is THE rarest General’s pickelhaube that we have ever located. It comes complete with its service spike, as well as the parade trichter with feathers.
Why is this helmet so rare? The Grand Duchy of Mecklenburg Schwerin was one of Imperial Germany’s smaller Grand Duchies. Remember that the largest military units within the German Empire belonged to the Kingdoms of Prussia, Bavaria, Württemberg, and Saxony, followed by (in terms of units supplied to the Army) the Grand Duchies of Baden and Hesse-Darmstadt. Mecklenburg-Schwerin lagged FAR behind those six entities. They contributed only two Infanterie Regiments (one of which included a battalion from the neighboring Grand Duchy of Mecklenburg-Strelitz), two Kavallerie (Dragoner) Regiments, one Artillerie Regiment, and one Jäger-Battalion. It is immediately evident that Mecklenburg-Schwerin’s military presence was fairly small. With the size of their military contingent, the need for Generals also was limited. Of course, the Grand Duke was a General, but I doubt that they had more then two or three other Generals at any one time. It is possible that one of them could have served on Berlin’s Great General Staff. Another could have commanded a brigade of Mecklenburg-Schwerin’s troops, or been attached to the Prussian IX. Armeekorps. The point is, Mecklenburg-Schwerin provided few opportunities for Generals.
Now that you have a sense how rare Mecklenburg-Schwerin Generals’ pickelhauben are, it is our extreme pleasure and privilege to share with you the rarest General’s Pickelhaube that Der Rittmeister Militaria has ever offered.
First, let me emphasize that our General understood and demanded the highest quality from this helmet’s purveyor. Whether he patronized a shop in Schwerin that supplied Schwerin’s royalty and other senior military commanders, or bought his headdresses and uniforms at one of Berlin’s elite military effects shops, he insisted on the BEST, as is reflected in this spiked helmet’s every aspect. Its superb leather body is clear, supple, and free of major defects. The front visor is squared rather than rounded, as is correct for a General officer’s helmet. It is quite clear that the helmet was lovingly cared for by its owner and each subsequent person who was privileged to own it. Its appearance is little different today than it was when the original owner bought it
more one-hundred-years-ago.
The helmet’s gold-toned furniture includes the chin scales, officers’ stars, cruciform, trim and, of course, its fluted spike. The wappen’s background consists of a massive gold-toned sunburst that features a smaller silver sunburst within it. The silver sunburst’s center displays a magnificent rendition of the Hausorden der Wendischen Krone, Mecklenburg-Schwerin’s highest family of orders. These orders were awarded during from 1864 through 1918 in several grades that ranged from a Kette (Collar) to a Großkreuz (Grand Cross), a Brauststern (Breast Star) to a Komturkreuz (Commander’s Cross), then down to the Ritterkreuz (Knight’s Cross), Goldenes Verdienstkreuz (Golden Service Cross), and Silbernes Verdienstkreuz (Silver Service Cross). Each of the decoration’s highest classes also could be awarded with diamonds, a crown, or swords in various combinations.
The Hausorden der Wendischen Krone that appears in the wappen’s center is very close in size and appearance to the Brauststern. The device features red, gold, and blue enamel. Mecklenburg-Schwerin’s Latin motto, "Per Aspera Ad Astra" (Through Adversity to the Stars) is rendered in gold lettering on the gold-bordered red enamel that encircles the gold crown within the device’s blue enamel center. [From its appearance, I would not be surprised if the crown is made of real GOLD]. The Hausorden der Wendischen Krone is presented in impressive high-relief against the silver sunburst. It absolutely "pops" when you look at it. The helmet also displays the correct Mecklenburg-Schwerin State’s kokarde and the Reich’s kokarde on either side.
Now we come to the
helmet’s utterly fantastic trichter and parade feathers. When the fluted, gold-toned spike is dismounted from the helmet, a gold-toned, fluted trichter is screwed into its place. This helmet’s heart and soul, a Mecklenburg-Schwerin General’s white and dark-blue cock feathers, is attached to that trichter. These feathers’ condition is every bit as handsome as is the helmet. Too often, Imperial German parade feathers can appear droopy and tired-looking. They can appear wilted, and often all of the feathers are NOT present. These feathers, however, simply blossom out from their trichter. The dark-blue feathers provide a striking contrast against their white counterparts. They are considerably darker than the blue ones found on a Bavarian General’s pickelhaube
The
helmet’s interior is equally as impressive. A top-quality leather sweatband is attached to a near-mint silk liner. Peeking under the silk liner, we see that 100% of its original hardware is present. We can also see that the wappen is properly attached and, of course, NO double holes appear. This helmet is 100% original. You will not be able to upgrade it.
I am pleased to share it with you. I am especially pleased that it is in such excellent condition. In Europe, the grading system for militaria is 1 to 4 (1 was best), with a plus or minus used for each grade level. I would definitely grade this as a 1, or possibly even a 1+. It is the closest to mint that you will ever find. It is that gorgeous a helmet. Its price reflects this truly magnificent pickelhaube’s rarity and condition. This was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that will remain a highlight of Der Rittmeister Militaria’s existence.
$49,500.00     August17

 

At Der Rittmeister Militaria, we strive to bring you the best in spiked helmets, or pickelhauben (plural for pickelhaube), one of Imperial German Militaria’s most interesting areas for collecting. While ORIGINALITY and AUTHENTICITY are of prime importance, please do not forget Der Rittmeister’s commitment to CONDITION and QUALITY. In this regard, we take special pride in offering you spiked helmets whose condition is at least well above average, if not excellent. I examine hundreds of pickelhauben to find the very few that fulfill all four criteria mentioned above. Upon receiving their new treasure, collectors who have purchased one of our pickelhauben often exclaim that their helmet looks even better than the photos we had displayed on our website. [We do use a high-quality digital camera to photograph our items and upgrade cameras every two years, but enough with the Der Rittmeister Militaria commercial]! Just remember, dear friends, Der Rittmeister’s Four Critical Criteria for collecting pickelhauben: ORIGINALITY, AUTHENTICITY, CONDITION, and QUALITY.
The pickelhaube was designed in 1842 by Prussia’s König Frederick William IV for use in the Prussian Infanterie. [The Prussian king might have copied similar helmets adopted by Russia’s military during the same time period. It is not clear whether this was a case of imitation, parallel invention, or if both were based on Napoleonic cuirassiers’ helmets]. The helmet style was soon adopted by Germany’s other states and kingdoms during the mid-19th Century, with Bavaria being the final principality to implement it in 1886. [The Bavarians always seemed to go their own way! Interestingly, Bavaria was also the last to authorize kugelhelme for their Artillerie Regiments in 1913]. In addition to Russia, spiked helmets were adopted by many Latin American countries. They were even worn by the USA’s armed forces from the 1880's until around 1910.
We also remind all pickelhaube enthusiasts about our good friend Jim Turinetti’s excellent reference books on the subject (click here to see DRM’s Imperial German Headdress Page Nr 3), available as spiral-bound paperbacks or on CD. You cannot go wrong with them. I can safely state that Jim is the USA’s foremost authority on pickelhauben. Please support him. Dollar for dollar, these books are the best on the market, and reward you with an immeasurable return in value! [Remember, Jim receives any and ALL the profits from his works, Der Rittmeister Militaria just promotes them to help educate the collecting community].

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

04-741 PRUSSIA (NASSAU) - PICKELHAUBE - FÄHNRICH’S - INFANTERIE-REGIMENT NR 88. This is a most interesting Fähnrich’s 2. Nassauisches Infanterie-Regiment Nr 88 pickelhaube. The regiment was created in 1808 in the midst of the Napoleonic Wars. The regiment was a part of the Prussian XVIII. Armeekorps. When WW I began in 1914 the 2. Nassauisches Infanterie-Regiment Nr 88 was attached to the XVIII. Armeekorps, then it was further attached to the 41. Brigade and the 21. Division. 2. Nassauisches Infanterie-Regiment Nr 88 and her sister regiment, 1. Nassauisches Infanterie-Regiment Nr 87. Both were a part of the Duchy of Nassau. In 1866, the Duchy sided with Austria along with Saxony, Württemberg, Baden, Saxe-Meiningen, Reuss-Greiz, Schaumburg-Lippe, Frankfurt, Bavaria, Hanover, Hesse-Kassel, Hesse-Darmstadt, Holstein, Schleswig, and Frankfurt. The 1866 Austro-Prussian War was a very sharp, brief war of seven weeks. When the war ended, Austria and her allies had suffered a severe thrashing. As a result of that war Prussia annexed portions of Bavaria, and Hesse Darmstadt, while fully annexing Hannover, Brunswick, Hesse-Kassel, Holstein, Schleswig, Frankfurt, and Nassau. All of the latter’s regiments became Prussian, and had to wear Prussian wappens on their headdress.
First, we need to define a Fähnrich’s particulars. Essentially, a Fähnrich
was a cadet/officer candidate. Leutnant was the lowest rank for an officer, and Fähnrich was slotted below that. While the situation was similar in some ways to that of a One-Year-Volunteer (OYV), a Fähnrich eventually became an officer, while an OYV served a one-year enlistment rather than the normal two-year period followed by service in the reserves. In the reserves, an OYV might work his way up through an NCO’s positions and in time become a Leutnant der Reserve or other Reserve Officer, such as an Oberleutnant der Reserve or even a Hauptmann der Reserve. Under certain circumstances, a Reserve Officer could transfer into the regular army.
That said, OYV or Fähnrich’s headdress generally is less frequently seen. It also one of the "best kept secrets" when it comes to pickelhauben, kugelhelme, etc. from a collecting standpoint. OYV’s and Fähnrichs were allowed a certain amount of flexibility with their uniforms and headdresses. Unlike enlisted men or NCO’s, they were responsible for purchasing their own uniforms, headdresses, personal gear, housing/meals, etc., as were officers. Both OYV’s and Fähnrichs were allowed to have pickelhauben that were nearly officers-quality trim levels. For example, an officer’s spiked helmet was privately-purchased, as were OYV’s and Fähnrichs. OYV’s and Fähnrichs’ wappens might have an open (voided) crown rather than an enlisted man (EM)/NCO’s closed crown. OYV’s and Fähnrichs’ could have taller spikes than (EM)/NCO’s. OYV’s and Fähnrichs’ might sport officers’ kokarden or possibly pearl rings in which to screw their spikes. Their helmets, however, almost always displayed EM/NCO’s lugs rather than officers’ stars. This is where it gets a bit tricky to determine if a spiked helmet was for an EM/NCO or a Fähnrich/Officer. OYV’s and Fähnrichs were REQUIRED to have at least one of their helmets’ details be different from those belonging to officers. The most common starting point was to have EM/NCO lugs instead of officers’ stars. The next two most common ways were the use of EM/NCO’s kokarden or closed crowns on their wappens.
INCREDIBLE is the only way to describe this helmet’s leather body. The surface is so smooth and supple that I can NO significant problems with it. This condition is the result of two situations. First, its original owner and its subsequent caretakers did a superior job of caring for it. Second, since it was a privately-purchased, officers-quality pickelhaube, it was far superior to helmets issued to troops through the Imperial German Army’s supply depots. The latter were issued, refurbished, reissued, refurbished, etc. until they were no longer serviceable.
Let us continue with the other details that differentiate this helmet from those for officers or EM/NCO’s. First, all of its furniture is gold-toned or brass, including the chin scales (flat rather than an officer’s domed scales), the wappen, the trim, the base, the spike, and so on. Note that the wappen displays the CLOSED crown indicative of an EM/NCO. These are our first clues that the helmet is NOT for an officer. The wappen also enables us to determine that this is from 2. Nassauisches Infanterie-Regiment Nr 88 rather than 1. Nassauisches Infanterie-Regiment Nr 87.
[PLEASE NOTE: 1897 was a very important date in Imperial German headdress history due to a major change enacted that year. Kaiser Wilhelm dictated that headdresses (particularly for the Infanterie) would add a second kokarde to represent the Reich. From the wearer’s perspective, the State’s kokarde was moved to the pickelhaube’s LEFT side, while Reich’s kokarde was placed on the right. A second major change was that Kaiser Wilhelm II restored previously won battle honors to many of the former states that had been absorbed into Prussia following the last of the 19th Century’s unification wars. This was accomplished by applying the appropriate bandeaux to the top and bottom of their wappens’ Prussian Eagles, thereby differentiating them from other Prussian Regiments.
In 2. Nassauisches Infanterie-Regiment Nr 88's case, THREE bandeaux were attached. At the top to the left of the eagle’s neck "La Belle" appears, while "Alliance" appears to its right. "Le Belle Alliance" refers to the scene of some of the most bitter fighting on 18 June 1815 during the Battle of Waterloo. ONLY the two Nassau regiments had earned this bandeau. [The 1. Nassauisches Infanterie-Regiment Nr 87 only participated at Waterloo, and so their pickelhauben only displayed that honor. Several other regiments (mostly Hanoverian) had earned "Waterloo" bandeaux, but none other than the Nassau Regiments had "Le Belle Alliance." The two additional bandeaux appear near the eagle’s legs at the wappen’s bottom: "Mesa de Ibor" (fought on 17 March1809) and "Medellin" (fought on 28 March 1809) during the Peninsula Campaign. These pitted the British, certain German regiments, as well as Spanish and Portuguese forces under Wellington’s command against the French. It was after the allied forces’ successful breakout from Spain into France that Napoleon was defeated and exiled to Elbe for the first time (prior to Waterloo). I cannot stress too strongly the rarity and importance of this wappen with its three bandeaux.
The rest of the helmet is a pure officer’s example. It has an officer’s pearl ring and officer’s kokarden. It sports a taller spike than a depot-issued EM/NCO’s pickelhaube, as well as an officer’s brass back strap (one for an EM/NCO has a sliding vent). The
officers’ styling continues into the helmet’s interior. The latter sports a brown leather sweatband that has seen only slight use. A complete, rust-toned silk liner is attached to the sweatband, which reveals only one small 1" area of shredding. This is far less than we often see on silk liners. The liner also lacks any perspiration or hair oil stains. One small section of the silk liner has pulled away from the sweatband, however, it is easily tucked up. I do not find the latter detractive to the helmet’s overall presentation.
ALL of the original hardware is present under the silk liner, with NO double holes. An indication of its size, "55," is marked on the inside. This helmet came to us from a trusted source in Germany and is 100% untouched.
We had our good friend and author Jim Turinetti examine this helmet and he felt it was marvelous. In my opinion, Jim is our best American expert on Imperial German headdresses. I regularly depend on his expertise. [See below for the link to his marvelous books that you can purchase directly from him].
This helmet represents a major value. Were it a pure officer’s helmet in corresponding condition, it would be priced at $7,000. We are pleased to share it with you as a fine value and an excellent addition to your collection.
$4,295.00    brAugust17

 

 

At Der Rittmeister Militaria, we strive to bring you the best in spiked helmets, or pickelhauben (plural for pickelhaube), one of Imperial German Militaria’s most interesting areas for collecting. While ORIGINALITY and AUTHENTICITY are of prime importance, please do not forget Der Rittmeister’s commitment to CONDITION and QUALITY. In this regard, we take special pride in offering you spiked helmets whose condition is at least well above average, if not excellent. I examine hundreds of pickelhauben to find the very few that fulfill all four criteria mentioned above. Upon receiving their new treasure, collectors who have purchased one of our pickelhauben often exclaim that their helmet looks even better than the photos we had displayed on our website. [We do use a high-quality digital camera to photograph our items and upgrade cameras every two years, but enough with the Der Rittmeister Militaria commercial]! Just remember, dear friends, Der Rittmeister’s Four Critical Criteria for collecting pickelhauben: ORIGINALITY, AUTHENTICITY, CONDITION, and QUALITY.
The pickelhaube was designed in 1842 by Prussia’s König Frederick William IV for use in the Prussian Infanterie. [The Prussian king might have copied similar helmets adopted by Russia’s military during the same time period. It is not clear whether this was a case of imitation, parallel invention, or if both were based on Napoleonic cuirassiers’ helmets]. The helmet style was soon adopted by Germany’s other states and kingdoms during the mid-19th Century, with Bavaria being the final principality to implement it in 1886. [The Bavarians always seemed to go their own way! Interestingly, Bavaria was also the last to authorize kugelhelme for their Artillerie Regiments in 1913]. In addition to Russia, spiked helmets were adopted by many Latin American countries. They were even worn by the USA’s armed forces from the 1880's until around 1910.
We also remind all pickelhaube enthusiasts about our good friend
Jim Turinetti’s excellent reference books on the subject (click here to see DRM’s Imperial German Headdress Page Nr 3), available as spiral-bound paperbacks or on CD. You cannot go wrong with them. I can safely state that Jim is the USA’s foremost authority on pickelhauben. Please support him. Dollar for dollar, these books are the best on the market, and reward you with an immeasurable return in value! [Remember, Jim receives any and ALL the profits from his works, Der Rittmeister Militaria just promotes them to help educate the collecting community].

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

04-667 INFANTERIE-REGIMENT Nr 87 OFFICER’S PICKELHAUBE - PRUSSIA. Today we are offering you something really "tasty." It is a 1. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 87 officer’s pickelhaube. The Duchy of Nassau’s entire military force consisted of the previous regiment and its sister, 2. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 88. Several smaller "Nassau" counties had been combined in 1806 to produce the new Duchy, due to Napoleon’s prodding (in his capacity as the Confederation of the Rhine’s "Protector"). Both regiments saw action during 1815's Battle of Waterloo against Napoleon (more about that later).
I lusted after this pickelhaube as soon as it was offered. Most of you are well aware that I have ZERO interest in poorly-conditioned helmets, and that my standards for ORIGINALITY and CONDITION are fierce. The helmet, however, more than exceeded my expectations and filled me with admiration. A dull black finish covers its entire leather body, which is close to absolute perfection. One tiny little circular ding (measuring about 1/8") shows up near the Reich's kokarde. It easily can be missed if one does not pay close attention. All of the helmet’s furniture is gilt, including the wappen, the flat chin scales, the trim, the officer’s stars, and the spike.
[Interestingly, the spike is a bit taller than those usually found on Prussian helmets. I believe it can be explained by the helmet’s decidedly NON-Prussian origins. We have already mentioned that our spiked helmet originated from 1. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 87. The Duchy of Nassau belonged to a group of German states (including the Kingdom of Hannover and its vassal state, Braunschweig) that allied with Austria during the 1866 Austro-Prussian War. The group was absorbed by Prussia following the alliance’s (very swift) defeat at the war’s conclusion. From then on, the former Duchy of Nassau’s regiments were considered Prussian units. Then, in 1897, two very important changes occurred that further altered headdresses’ appearance. First, all states began displaying the Reich's kokarden on all their headdresses, including pickelhauben, tschapkas, busbies, tschakos, mützen, Schirmmützen, and etc. Prior to that, only the state’s kokarden were displayed. {It was a huge change. Now, from the wearer’s perspective, the state’s kokarde was worn on a pickelhaube’s left side, while the Reich's kokarde was worn on the right}. The second change affected Austria’s hapless 1866 War allies. The regiments that had been absorbed into the Prussian Army were once again allowed to display on their pickelhauben the bandeaux awarded to them by their former rulers. 1. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 87, which had fought bravely at the Battle of Waterloo, once again proudly displayed their bandeaux touting "La Belle Alliance" on their pickelhauben. That very bandeau is how we identified the helmet’s origin with 1. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 87. Its presence also helps explain the taller, non-Prussian spike].
[We have one more historical aside. Our helmet’s sister regiment, 2. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 88, displayed bandeaux for "La Belle Alliance, Mesa de Ibor, and Medellin." It had previously fought with Wellington during the Peninsula Campaign. Both Nassau regiments (totaling some 3,000 men) stood and held at "La Belle Alliance," a Belgian inn that was Napoleon’s headquarters until he joined his troops in the field. Ferocious fighting broke out near the inn, and the Nassau men suffered serious casualties. After the battle was won, German Generalfeldmarschall Gebhard Blücher suggested that the overall conflict be known as the Battle of La Belle Alliance. The English commander, the Duke of Wellington, objected that it was bad form to name a battle after the losing commander’s headquarters. Ultimately, it came to be known as the Battle of Waterloo].
The pickelhaube’s wappen displays a fine, frosted finish. The gold and black "La Belle Alliance" bandeau makes a good contrast against it. The correct state’s (Prussian) and Reich's kokarden are in place.
The interior boasts a gently-used, light-brown, leather sweatband. A light-beige silk liner, also in top condition, is attached. A few perspiration stains appear, but the actual silk liner is excellent. When one pulls the liner’s two halves apart to look underneath, all of the correct hardware is in place. More important, NO double holes show up where the wappen attaches to the helmet’s body. A penciled-in "55" indicates the helmet’s size.
This spiked helmet is in absolutely beautiful condition. You will have to search long and hard to find a better one. $6,995.00
 brAugust17

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

04-742 PRUSSIA - PICKELHAUBE - RESERVE OFFICER’S - PARADE - GARDE-DRAGONER-REGIMENT NR 2. The Kingdom of Prussia fielded two Garde-Dragoner-Regiments. Today we are offering you a fine pickelhaube from Garde-Dragoner-Regiment Kaiserin Alexandra von Rußland Nr 2. Tsarina Alexandra was Russian Tsar Nicholas II’s wife, and the Regimental Chef of the latter unit. [She originally hailed from the Grand Duchy of Hesse-Darmstadt and played a central role in the 19th and early 20th Century intermarriages among European royals. Much of this was the result of English Queen Victoria’s many daughters and sons marrying members of Prussia’s, Russia’s and other German States’ royal houses, then producing numerous heirs. Kaiser Wilhelm II was Victoria’s eldest grandson. His mother, also Victoria, was Queen Victoria’s eldest daughter, who married the eventual Kaiser Friedrich III. To complicate matters further, Tsar Nicholas II was also Kaiser Wilhelm II’s third cousin, while Alexandra was Wilhelm’s 1st cousin. Alexandra later perished with her husband and children following the Russian Revolution]. Garde-Dragoner-Regiment Kaiserin Alexandra von Rußland Nr 2 was founded in 1860 and garrisoned in Berlin.
This spiked helmet is specific to Garde-Dragoner-Regiment Kaiserin Alexandra von Rußland Nr 2. It differs from a Garde-Dragoner-Regiment Nr 1's pickelhaube in that Garde-Dragoner-Regiment Kaiserin Alexandra von Rußland Nr 2's pickelhauben sported silver furniture, while Garde-Dragoner-Regiment Nr 1's pickelhauben featured gold-toned.
The helmet’s leather body is in appealing condition. While the leather reveals some small defects, it is supple and in much-better-than-average condition. A few small nicks appear here and there, as well as some shrinkage to the rear visor, but these minor faults are not detractive. Note that its front visor is squared (as is proper for Dragoner pickelhauben) rather than the rounded ones found on Infanterie Regiments’ spiked helmets.
As previously noted, the helmet’s furniture is mostly silver-toned, with the exception of its gold-toned officers’ stars and brass chin scales. The wappen displays a beautifully-toned silver surface with a gorgeous patina that tells us that the helmet has not been cleaned in decades. Its eagle’s wings extend on either side to each kokarde’s midpoint. [To me, this is one of the most beautiful aspects of Garde-Regiments’ pickelhauben].
The wappen’s focal point is the breathtaking Garde Star centered on the eagle’s chest. Its outer section features a combination of white and gold enamel emblazoned with the Garde’s Latin motto encircling an inner "button" that displays a gold and black enamel Hohenzollern Eagle. Directly below the Garde Star is a Reserve Officer’s Cross, also in silver. Other portions of the silver furniture include the front visor’s trim and back strap. The elegant cruciform is also silver, as is the white parade bush’s straight, non fluted trichter. The silver’s ultra-high-quality patina is even throughout the helmet (it actually could be made of German silver, also known as nickel). The correct white horse hair parade bush is very full and handsome. The exterior’s only other details are the correct State and Reich’s officers’ kokarden.
The helmet’s interior features a well-used brown leather sweatband. Attached to the sweatband is an equally as well-used, beige silk liner. While it is full and complete, it does exhibit substantial staining from perspiration and hair oil. It has NOT shredded as is the case with so many silk liners. ALL of the original hardware is visible under the liner, with NO double holes. It is an incredibly original pickelhaube. This is the kind of helmet that I like to offer to you: not altered in any way and identical to the state it was in when it left the military effects shop with its original owner more than one-hundred-years-ago. It is a fine pre WW I example.
We had our good friend and author Jim Turinetti examine this helmet and he felt it was marvelous. In my opinion, Jim is our best American expert on Imperial German headdresses. I regularly depend on his expertise. [See below for the link to his marvelous books that you can purchase directly from him].
While we are pleased to offer the helmet’s parade trichter and horsehair bush, this helmet has NO spike.
$6,495.00
      August17

 

At Der Rittmeister Militaria, we strive to bring you the best in spiked helmets, or pickelhauben (plural for pickelhaube), one of Imperial German Militaria’s most interesting areas for collecting. While ORIGINALITY and AUTHENTICITY are of prime importance, please do not forget Der Rittmeister’s commitment to CONDITION and QUALITY. In this regard, we take special pride in offering you spiked helmets whose condition is at least well above average, if not excellent. I examine hundreds of pickelhauben to find the very few that fulfill all four criteria mentioned above. Upon receiving their new treasure, collectors who have purchased one of our pickelhauben often exclaim that their helmet looks even better than the photos we had displayed on our website. [We do use a high-quality digital camera to photograph our items and upgrade cameras every two years, but enough with the Der Rittmeister Militaria commercial]! Just remember, dear friends, Der Rittmeister’s Four Critical Criteria for collecting pickelhauben: ORIGINALITY, AUTHENTICITY, CONDITION, and QUALITY.
The pickelhaube was designed in 1842 by Prussia’s König Frederick William IV for use in the Prussian Infanterie. [The Prussian king might have copied similar helmets adopted by Russia’s military during the same time period. It is not clear whether this was a case of imitation, parallel invention, or if both were based on Napoleonic cuirassiers’ helmets]. The helmet style was soon adopted by Germany’s other states and kingdoms during the mid-19th Century, with Bavaria being the final principality to implement it in 1886. [The Bavarians always seemed to go their own way! Interestingly, Bavaria was also the last to authorize kugelhelme for their Artillerie Regiments in 1913]. In addition to Russia, spiked helmets were adopted by many Latin American countries. They were even worn by the USA’s armed forces from the 1880's until around 1910.

 

We also remind all pickelhaube enthusiasts about our good friend Jim Turinetti’s excellent reference books on the subject (click here to see DRM’s Imperial German Headdress Page Nr 3), available as spiral-bound paperbacks or on CD. You cannot go wrong with them. I can safely state that Jim is the USA’s foremost authority on pickelhauben. Please support him. Dollar for dollar, these books are the best on the market, and reward you with an immeasurable return in value! [Remember, Jim receives any and ALL the profits from his works, Der Rittmeister Militaria just promotes them to help educate the collecting community].

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

04-746 BAVARIA - JEWELRY BOX - MINIATURE PICKELHAUBE. This is a most interesting, pickelhaube-shaped jewelry box that measures 2 ½" x 2 ½." Its exterior is covered in black velvet. It sports a fine brass Bavarian wappen and spike, as well as brass chin scales, kokarden, and rear trim. The box’s top swings open to reveal an upper white silk liner. The bottom is covered in beige velvet. A small hook appears toward the base’s top, to which one could attach an item, most probably a pendant. We are showing one in the attached photographs for reference purposes ONLY. [The pendant is NOT included with the jewelry box].
Its overall condition is excellent. This is a perfect way to present a gift to that favorite person in your life, and let them share your passion for
Imperial German history! $275.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

33-339 TSCHAKO - OFFICER’S - DEUTSCHES REICH SEE-BATAILLONE. [PLEASE NOTE: For those of our customers who are not as familiar with the German language, the addition of an "e" renders the German word for "battalion" plural]. The See-Bataillone were one of the most illustrious formations within Imperial Germany’s military. The See-Bataillone served a purpose similar to that of the United States Marines Corps (USMC), in that they acted as the security forces onboard larger warships. They performed the same function at Germany’s overseas embassies, although their scope of service extended well beyond these two roles. The original two Bataillone were garrisoned at Wilhelmshaven (See-Bataillon Nr II) and Kiel (See-Bataillon Nr I) in their capacity as ships’ security forces. [Just like the USMC, who operated under the U. S. Navy’s command, the See-Bataillone served under the Kaiserliche Marine]. See-Bataillon Nr III was formed in 1898 and garrisoned at Kiautschou as part of German colonial China’s military presence, along with other German infantry, cavalry, and artillery regiments. WW I’s advent in 1914 saw See-Bataillon Nr III forced to surrender, and the formation of additional See-Bataillone back home. Ultimately, a total of three Marine-Korps Divisions numbering approximately 70,000 men participated (primarily in France and Belgium) in some of the Great War’s bloodiest battles under the command of naval admirals.
This leads us to today’s offering, a See-Bataillone officer’s tschako (shako). It is a pre World War I quality piece; thus, it probably belonged to an officer from one of the three original See-Bataillone. The tschako’s body is black velvet, except for the top, the front/rear visors, and a trim section above the latter that leads to the black velvet, all of which are black leather.
The tschako’s most striking feature (and what sets it above tschako’s used by other military units) is its magnificently fire-gilded wappen. It clearly is a See-Bataillone wappen, as it features an eagle with outspread wings ( measuring 5 ½" from tip to tip). A very impressive
Hohenzollern Crown with a flowing stole appears above the eagle, whose talons grasp a naval anchor. The tschako’s chin scales are gold-toned, with their leather portions still intact behind them. The exterior’s final feature is a handsome Reich Offizier’s Feldzeichen (Field Badge). The Feldzeichen is composed of four silver bullion ropes followed by a single row of black bullion, and ending with one final silver bullion row. A red felt insert appears in the Feldzeichen’s center, which identifies its Feldzeichen as being for the Reich rather than another state. All naval headdresses came from the Reich, so red was an important feature for the various kokarden, Feldzeichen centers, etc.
The
tschako’s interior features a well used, but complete, brown leather sweatband. This band displays two distinct sets of marks, which I believe either were made by a museum or indicate it came from a large, personal collection. The tschako’s beige silk liner is well used and shows significant perspiration staining. The silk liner reveals another set of marks stenciled on it in red, further identifying this as a former museum piece or coming from an extensive personal collection. All of the original and correct hardware is present.

 

This is a complete, original, and untouched example of a very fine See-Bataillone officer’s tschako. The interior is not in quite as fine a condition as the exterior, but as you will probably display it with its exterior on view, you should not find this detractive. $5,995.00    

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

02-444 MEDAL BAR -TWO-PLACE - GEBRÜDER GODET WORKSHOPS - BERLIN. This a lovely two-place medal bar. It was produced In the 1930's from the workshops of Gebrüder Godet (previously Godet und Söhne), which had been one of Kaiser Wilhelm II’s principal House Jewelers. They had produced some of the Imperial German Period’s finest orders and decorations, including Prussia’s Orden Pour le Mérite, the Order of the Black Eagle, the Red Eagle Order, Hohenzollern House Orders, Iron Crosses, as well as many top level orders and decorations from Germany’s other royal houses.
The two-place medal bar displays the medals listed below from left to right.

 

 

 

* 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class.

* Hindenburg Cross with Swords for Combatants.

 

Both the decorations are in MINT condition. Its reverse features a sturdy, wide pin for mounting it on a tunic or other garment. It has a gray felt backing, and a black label on which is beautifully stitched: Gebr. Godet & Co. [The Godet is much larger than anything else on the label]. $225.00   

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

05-1704 HINDENBURG CROSS - NEXT OF KIN. The Hindenburg Cross was instituted after the death of Generalfeldmarschall and Weimar Republic Präsident Paul von Hindenburg (1847-1934). Hindenburg was a hero in Germany for his wartime service and command of the General Staff in the war’s second half. [He had been retired when the war broke out. He was recalled and given command of an Armee, then defeated the Russians at Tannenberg in August 1914]. He retired at WW I’s end. Due to Germany’s postwar turmoil, he was lured back to serve his country again from 1925 to 1934 as its President. After his death, the Hindenburg Cross was instituted in three classes. The most common was the Hindenburg Cross with Swords for Combatants, a bronze-toned decoration. Next was a similar award without swords for Non Combatants. Finally, an award was given to the families of soldiers who fell in the Fatherland’s service, a blackened cross without swords.
Today we are offering an example of the third variation, the
black Hindenburg Cross for the Next-of-Kin. This decoration measures 1 ½ " x 1 ½." It has its jump ring, but NO ribbon. $30.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

06-243 HESSE-DARMSTADT - AWARD DOCUMENT AND DECORATION - TAPFERKEITS=MEDAILLE - ORIGINAL PRESENTATION PACKET. Today we are offering you the opportunity to acquire the award document (Urkunde) and the decoration for the Grand Duchy of Hesse-Darmstadt’s Tapferkeits=Medaille (Bravery Medal), along with its original presentation packet. It was the equivalent to the 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class. While the Iron Cross was a Prussian medal, it was also awarded as a Reich’s medal. [Most of the Imperial German states also awarded its equivalents in the first and second classes]. The silver-toned decoration measures 1 ½" in diameter. Its obverse features a profile view of Grand Duke Ernst Ludwig (1868-1937), Hesse-Darmstadt’s last ruler. [Ernst Ludwig was the son of Grand Duke Louis IV (1837-1892) and Princess Alice (1843-1878) of Great Britain. Princess Alice was Queen Victoria (1819-1901) of England and Prince Albert (1819-1861) of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha’s third child. Queen Victoria and her children formed a virtual "Who’s Who" of Imperial European royalty. These arranged marriages intertwined Europe’s royal houses and, in time, contributed to some of the conflicts leading to WW I]. The medal’s reverse displays a laurel leaf wreath with "Für Tapferkeit" in its center.
The medal itself is not the most common of its type, however, what really makes this an exciting addition to a collection is its original paper packet. I cannot begin to tell you how difficult it is to find the award packets for the 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class or its many equivalents. So often the recipient tossed the packet away after receiving the award. I can count on the fingers of one hand the number of packets that I have unearthed. Simply stated, the packet is far rarer than the medal itself. It is made of heavy blue paper and bears the medal’s name on the front. It measures 1 ¾" x 2 ¼."
The award document is quite handsome. It measures 9" x 11." At its top is the Grand Duchy of Hesse-Darmstadt’s Ducal Crown. "Ernst Ludwig" appears in large letters below the crown. The document was issued to an Unteroffizier Marr, who was assigned to Infanterie-Regiment Prinz Carl (4.Großherzogl. Hessisches) Nr 118. The regiment was garrisoned at Worms and, like all Hesse-Darmstadt regiments, was assigned to the XVIII. Armeekorps. So, Marr was a native son of Hesse-Darmstadt.

 

The document was issued on 15 May 1917. Ernst Ludwig’s original signature appears at the document’s bottom right side. The document has a couple of small holes. Its bottom portion has three small tears and has been folded under in its lower left corner. The fold measures about 2." We have folded it back in place.
The decoration and urkunde make for a fine presentation. Both are scarce on their own and become even MORE desirable together.
$295.00    

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08-571 OLDENBURG - EHRENKREUZ 1st KLASSE MIT DER GOLDENEN KRONE. This is the small Grand Duchy of Oldenburg’s Honor Cross 1st Class with the Golden Crown. It was awarded from 1856 through 1918, and issued without AND with Swords. The gold-toned cross measures 2 ½ " x 2 ½." A very handsome articulated golden crown appears at its top. The decoration’s obverse features Herzog Peter Friedrich Ludwig’s royal cypher (the entire family of decorations was named for him). Its reverse displays Oldenburg’s Coat-of-Arms. The decoration is mounted on a short piece of original blue and red ribbon. This is a seldom-seen decoration that we have not offered in the past. $550.00    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

09-1024 IRON CROSS - 1914 - 2nd CLASS. This is a good example of a 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class that is in above-average condition. It does not have a ribbon or a jump ring, and is priced accordingly. $65.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10-880 PATRIOTIC MORTAR AND PESTLE FROM WW I. Every time I think I have encountered all things that patriotic Germans used during WW I, I receive a surprise. Such is the case with our offering today. It is a mortar and pestle from 1914 to 1916. A mortar and pestle are not some things that we often see today. They were a fixture in pharmacies one-hundred-years-ago. The pharmacist had to blend different medications together, since they did not come pre made from the firms that produced them. Of course, back then the number of medications available was far less than today. Antibiotics had yet to be invented. It took knowledge and precise measurements to ensure that the proper blend was prepared. 
The mortar measures 4 ½" tall, 5" in diameter at the mouth, and 3" in diameter at the base. It is made of a very heavy, solid metal. It could well be brass or possibly gold-toned steel. Two "horns" appear on its sides where it could have been attached to a cradle that would swing down to empty its blended contents. The dates 1914-1916 appear on one side of the mortar, while its other side depicts a large caliber siege gun! It was a fine way for a doctor or a pharmacist to show his patriotism.
The pestle is made of the same material as the mortar. It measures 7 ½" in length and 3" in circumference. It will make a nice conversation piece. If you are a pharmacist or doctor, it would provide a perfect way to combine your training with history. It also would look quite nifty on your desk or a bookcase! Even if you are not a medical professional, it is still a fine display piece.
The pair is quite hefty, weighing a combined 4" lbs., 13 ounces. [Additional shipping will be required].
$250.00   

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10-881 STAMPS - TWENTY COLORED ARMEEKORPS DOCUMENT STAMPS. A great deal of paperwork was generated within the Imperial German military establishment, from regiments up through brigades, the Armeekorps and Berlin’s General Staff. Each and every unit had its own individual rubber stamp. The latter generally were accompanied by its initiating officer’s signature. Prior to WW I, the highest level within the Imperial German Army was the Armeekorps. These were regionally located in district offices. Each regiment within the district was assigned to that particular Armeekorps. Each Armeekorps contained its various Infanterie, Artillerie, Kavallerie, (etc). Regiments within it. For example, if the Grand Duchy of Baden was assigned to the XIV. Armeekorps, then ALL of Baden’s regiments were assigned to the XIV. Armeekorps. Due to the Prussian Army’s greater size and scope, ITS regiments were scattered among several Armeekorps. The other three Imperial German Kingdoms, Bavaria, Württemberg and Saxony, had three, one, and two Armeekorps, respectively. [To better enable your understanding of how the various Armeekorps were scattered through Germany, we have attached a photograph of Germany showing their locations].
In addition to their rubber stamps, the Armeekorps also employed various paper stamps/labels containing their information. Today we are offering an interesting collection of these paper stamps. They are quite colorful. They vary in size to a small degree. The largest measures 1 ½" in diameter, while the smallest is 1 ¼" in diameter. Most of them are for the Prussian Armeekorps, with one for the General Staff in Berlin, another for the Engineering Corps, and two very rare stamps for Berlin’s Garde-Korps, for a total of TWENTY paper stamps. Their identities are listed below. [Please note: the spelling for "Armeekorps" and "Kommando" varies from stamp to stamp. We are presenting them AS they appear on each stamp.

 

1). Generalstab des Feldheeres - Berlin (Nachr.-Offz.)
2). General Commando 1tes Armee-Corps
3). General-Commando 2ten Armeecorps
4). General-Commando 3tes Armeecorps
5). Königl. Preuss. General-Kommando 4. Armee-Corps
6). Kgl. Preuss. General-Commando Des VI. Armee-Corps
7). Königlich Preussisches General-Kommando Des IX. Armee-Korps (Dark-Blue)
8). Kgl. Preuss. General Kommando IX. Armee-Korps (Light-Blue)
9). Königl. Preuss. General-Kommando Des 10. Armee Korps (Red)
10). Königl. Preuss. General Kommando Des 10. Armee Korps (Orange)
11). General-Kommando 14. Armee-Korps
12). Kön. Preuss. Intendantur D. XVten Armee-Corps
13). Königlich Preussisches General-Commando Des XVI. Armee-Corps
14). Königl. Pr. Intendantur Des 17ten Armee-Korps.
15). Königl. Intendantur XVII. Armee Corps
16). Kgl. Pr. Militair-Intendantur Des XVIII. ArmeeKorps
17). Königlich Preussisches GeneralKommando XX. Armee-Korps
18). Königl. Preussische Intendantur des GardeKorps
19). Kgl. Preuss. Stellvertr. General-Oomando (sic) Des Garde-Corps
20). Koen. Preuss. General Inspection D. Ingenieur Corps U. D. Festungen

 

This is a very fine assortment of stamps that would look amazing if well-framed, perhaps with a postcard or two, or something else to add interest to the presentation. $225.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10-875 XRV IRON CROSS - CUFF LINKS. This is a consignment item, a simply wonderful pair of cuff links that features the Iron Cross. [Back in the day, a gentleman sought out unique cuff links to secure the French cuffs of his dress shirt]. These cuff links show a certain sense of style. Each link’s base is circular and made of mother-of-pearl. Each one measures ½" in diameter. Mounted to each center is a miniature black enamel Iron Cross. Each link’s shank is made of brass.
If you are a gentleman or gentle lady who wants to highlight your French-cuffed dress shirts with ultra high-quality cuff links AND advertise your appreciation of your collecting hobby, then these were made for YOU!
$250.00 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12-812 GENERALFELDMARSCHALL PAUL VON HINDENBURG - FRAMED METAL PLAQUE. This is a very high-quality, stamped metal (most likely steel) plaque featuring Generalfeldmarschall and later Weimar Republic Präsident Paul von Hindenburg (1847-1934). Hindenburg was a successful officer in the Imperial German Army who served with distinction in the Prussian Army during the 1866 Austro-Prussian War and the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian War. [He was decorated in the latter. In fact, he was at Versailles when King Wilhelm I of Prussia became Germany’s first Kaiser]. Following the Franco-Prussian War, he ascended within the German Army. He had retired when WW I began in 1914. He was brought back from retirement as a Generaloberst to command the German 8. Armee with his brilliant Chief of Staff, Erich Ludendorff. They served together through the end of WW I. The 8. Armee roundly defeated the Russians at the Battle of Tannenberg late in August 1914, then at the Battle of Masurian Lakes in mid September of the same year. Hindenburg received the Orden Pour le Mérite in August 1914, one of WW I’s first major awards. The towering Hindenburg (who stood a larger-than-life six feet five inches tall) was promoted from Generaloberst to Generalfeldmarschall in November 1914. He commanded all the Central Powers’ forces in the East until August 1916, when he was transferred to Berlin as Chief of the Great General Staff, a post he retained until WW I ended.
Hindenburg retired from the Army at war’s end, and then returned to serve as Germany’s Präsident in 1925. [Adolf Hitler assumed the position of Germany’s Chancellor in 1933. He retained that official title after Hindenburg’s 1934 death in addition to becoming Führer]. Hindenburg was a national hero in Germany from his 1914 return to Army service until his death in 1934.
This large, heavy-framed metal presentation is made of stamped steel. The period wooden frame measures 21" x 24."  It weighs a whopping 6 pounds. The bronze-toned plaque bears von Hindenburg’s name and rank. The detail to his image is quite impressive. He is wearing his PLM around his neck. His Generalfeldmarschall’s crossed batons are quite plainly visible on his shoulder board. The plaque is secured within the frame by four screws. A study wire hanger appears on the plaque’s reverse.
[Extra shipping will be required due to the weight and size of this most impressive presentation]. $250.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12-813 GENERALFELDMARSCHALL AUGUST VON MACKENSEN - FRAMED METAL PLAQUE. This is a very high-quality, stamped metal (most likely steel) plaque featuring Generalfeldmarschall August von Mackensen (1849-1945). Prior to his elevation to nobility, Mackensen was a young cavalry officer in the 2. Leib-Husaren-Regiment Nr 2, having joined in 1869. He served with the regiment in the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian War, for which he was awarded the 1870 Iron Cross 2nd Class for bravery. Following the Franco-Prussian War he rose through the Imperial German Army’s ranks, and in 1893 was appointed by Kaiser Wilhelm II to command 1. Leib-Husaren-Regiment Nr 1. He held that post until 1898, when he was named an adjutant to Kaiser Wilhelm II (the first commoner to hold that position). He was knighted in 1899. From 1901-1903, he was the Brigade Commander in charge of 1. Leib-Husaren-Regiment Nr 1 and 2. Leib-Husaren-Regiment Nr 2, based in Danzig. He then commanded the 36th Division from 1903-1908. Beginning in 1908, he became the Prussian XVII. Armeekorps’ Commander. That division was placed under the 8. Armee, which was commanded by Paul von Hindenburg.
Mackensen was an aggressive commander, who shared in 1914's key victories at the Battles of Tannenberg and Masurian Lake. Von Mackensen was awarded the Orden Pour le Mérite in November 1914, then also given command of the German 9. Armee under von Hindenburg, who by then commanded all Central Power troops in the East. Von Mackensen was promoted to Generalfeldmarschall in 1915. He assumed command of the Central Power troops in the East when Hindenburg took over command of the Great German General Staff in August 1916. Von Mackensen received virtually every German order and decoration during his career, including the Oak Leaves for the Orden Pour le Mérite in June 1915. He was also one of the five recipients of the 1914 Grand Cross of the Iron Cross
He retired from military life at WW I’s end, but continued to support monarchist groups. He also attended Kaiser Wilhelm II’s funeral at Haus Doorn in 1941, wearing the 1. Leib-Husaren-Regiment Nr 1's full uniform. This was his preferred uniform from his days as commander of that regiment. As the three most recognizable officers affiliated with the regiment, he, Kaiser Wilhelm II, and Kronprinz Wilhelm II made its uniform and busby famous. Von Mackensen himself died in November 1945 at the age of ninety-five.
This large, heavy-framed metal presentation is made of stamped steel. The period wooden frame measures 21" x 24."
It weighs a whopping 6 pounds. The bronze-toned plaque bears von Mackensen’s name and rank. The detail to his image is quite impressive. He is wearing his PLM around his neck. His Generalfeldmarschall’s crossed batons are quite plainly visible on his shoulder board. The plaque is secured within the frame by four screws. A study wire hanger appears on the plaque’s reverse. [Extra shipping will be required due to the weight and size of this most impressive presentation]. $250.00      mkAugust17

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13-1033 KRIEGSTAGBUCH (WAR DIARY) - U-25 (UC-15). All Imperial German Navy ships’ commanders were required to submit a Kriegstagbuch (War Diary) detailing their vessels’ voyages. These were submitted up through the chain of command until they ultimately reached the offices of the Hochseeflotte (High Seas Fleet). Today we are offering just such a document for the U-25 (also known as the UC-15). The log covers the period of 21 through 26 March 1916, and was kept by Oberleutnant zur See Albrecht von Dewitz, the U-25's Commander. Von Dewitz entered the Navy as a cadet in 1908. He commanded the UC-15 from her June 1915 commissioning. [It is interesting to note that he refers to the U-Boot as U-25 (UC-15) on the Kriegstagbuch’s title page. I do not quite understand this. In checking records, he was NOT the U-25's commander, but IS listed as the UC-15's commander. Also, PLEASE NOTE: while under von Dewitz’s command, the UC-15 was pitted against the Russians in the Baltic and the Black Sea, both areas under Prinz Heinrich of Prussia’s command].
From 28 June 1915 through 20 June 1916, von Dewitz and the UC-15 sank three Russian ships, one of which was a Destroyer. After von Dewitz’s departure in June 1916, the UC-15 was commanded by Bruno Heller. The UC-15 was lost with all hands on 30 November 1916.
The Kriegstagbuch measures 13 ½ " x 8 ¼." The U-Boot’s name is typed on the title page (along with the confusing U-25/UC15 designation), as well as the patrol dates, and the commanding officer’s name and rank. Inside the Kriegstagbuch we find six neatly-typed pages that describe
the UC-15's daily activities. Included are that day’s entry times, the UC-15's course, etc. Each entry indicates that they were operating in the Black Sea. The Russian port of Sevastopol is mentioned, as well as a fellow U-Boots UB-8 and UB-7.
As it is neatly typed, you will find the document easy to follow. You can enjoy hours of digging into the specifics. As much attention as U-Boots received during WW II, WW I’s U-Boot service honed the skills of many officers who later played similar roles in WW II. These included Wilhelm Canaris (1887-1945), the naval security arm chief, Karl Dönitz (1891-1980), WW II’s first commander of the submarine arm and later commander of the entire Kriegsmarine. Following Adolf Hitler’s death, Dönitz was Germany Führer during WW II’s final days and the official who surrendered to the Allies in May 1945.
$795.00   

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13-1034 WW I U-BOOT INFORMATION FILE - U-BOOT BLUEPRINTS INCLUDED. U-Boot collectors will find this file on WW I German U-Boots VERY interesting. The first portion of the file contains an original listing of the Great War’s U-Boots. The article, first published in 1919, was titled "Schiffbau" (Ship Building). The latter lists many of the Kaiserliche Marine’s U-Boots during the war. Those listed include many of their technical details, such as dimensions, etc., as well as whether or not they survived the war. The article goes on to describe the U-Boots’ electric motors and electrical systems. It contains lots of sketches and drawings that describe the U-Boots’ propulsion systems when submerged.
In addition to the "Schiffbau" article, the file features many photostats made from original sources (these are NOT modern day copies,
but from that period or perhaps a bit later). [The first photostat machines were introduced in the USA during the early 20th Century, so it is VERY possible these photostats here come from 1919 to 1930. They are quite different, to say the least]. Some are reverse images.
The source information is very detailed and technical in nature. If you have ever wanted to "dig under the skin" of the Great War’s U-Boots, this fascinating file is perfect. I estimate that the file contains between 60 to 75 pages of information. The last few pages that I glanced through even contained a little information about the U.S. Navy!
$150.00   

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16-468 BRITISH POSTER - REPRINT - WARNS THE PUBLIC ABOUT GERMAN ZEPPELIN AND AIRCRAFT DANGERS. During WW I, the Imperial German Army and Navy launched bombing missions against London and other English cities. In order to inform and protect its citizens, His Majesty’s Printing Office produced a poster that compared German aircraft (including zeppelins) with England’s. The posters were posted in public areas. They were also available to purchase for the sum of two pence in 1915. These posters showed the various German fixed-wing aircraft and zeppelins that could appear in England’s skies. They also depicted comparable British aircraft to reduce the panic that resulted whenever airplanes or zeppelins were spotted overhead. As it was still early in the war, none of the more highly-advanced German airplanes were yet depicted. The Albatros and Fokker firms’ more famous aircraft and Gotha’s massive bombers were still in the future.
PLEASE NOTE: this is a reprint, and NOT an original. It was produced by the Imperial War Museum from an original in their collection. The poster measures 19 ½ " x 29 ¾." It is mounted on poster board, so we will have to mail it to you flat (resulting in a bit more postage). It is in very good condition, overall. The poster board sports two or three dings, along with corresponding tears/foxing to the poster.
$95.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19-284 AUTOGRAPHED LETTER - GENERAL DER INFANTERIE DIETRICH GRAF VON HÜLSEN-HAESLER. This is an autographed letter signed by General der Infanterie Dietrich Graf von Hülsen-Haesler. He joined the Kaiser Alexander Garde-Grenadier-Regiment Nr 1 in 1870 as a young Leutnant. [I am not sure if he saw service in the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian War]. It was the Prussian Army’s second-most-elite Infanterie Regiment after the 1. Garde-Regiment zu Fuß. Von Hülsen-Haesler rose through the ranks to become Kaiser Wilhelm II’s Adjutant in 1889. Following that, he commanded a Garde-Regiment. He was promoted to Generalmajor in 1899, and served as the Garde-Korps Chief of Staff. From 1901 until his 1908 death, he was a General der Infanterie and the Chef of the Militärkabinits. This department oversaw all matters concerning the Imperial German Army’s officers and worked directly with Kaiser Wilhelm II. [SIDE NOTE: von Hülsen-Haesler was a homosexual and died of a heart attack while wearing ballerina garb at one of the Kaiser’s hunting estates. The entire matter was obviously hushed up due to his close, almost twenty-year working relationship with the Kaiser].
 

 

Today we are offering you a handwritten letter from von Hülsen-Haesler that is dated 28 April 1894. The letter is written on a piece of paper measuring 8 ¾" x 11." It has been folded in half so that the letter appears on four pages. Below von Hülsen-Haesler’s signature we see a pencil notation identifying the letter’s author. The overall condition of the letter is very fine. Although I do not have a translation of the letter’s subject matter, it could make an interesting research project. $150.00   

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20-344 PRUSSIA - SERVING SPOON - SILVER-PLATED - HONORING KING FREDERICK THE GREAT. This is a very early patriotic item that honors Prussia’s first great King, Frederick the Great (1712-1786). Frederick elevated Prussia from a very small, obscure nation to major player status in European politics and warfare. Under his leadership Prussia built a strong army that soon made its presence well known. In addition to his reorganization of Prussia and its military, accompanied by his success during the Seven Years War, Frederick was very much a patron of the arts and an important castle-builder. His principal castle in Potsdam, Sanssouci, was patterned after the French castle at Versailles. Frederick was very much a Francophile who considered the German language to be too harsh and guttural. He far preferred French, and made it Prussia’s official court language. Prussia’s highest decoration had a French name, Orden Pour le Mérite.
This very detailed serving spoon measures 11" in length and 3 ½ " wide. The handle features a full-figure display of Frederick the Great that measures 4 ¾" from the top of his hat to the toes of his boots. The figure is quite detailed. He sports a Breast Star on his left breast, a walking stick in his right hand, and a sword at his left hip. He stands on a base that is inscribed "Fridericus Borussorum Rex 1740-1786," the years during which he sat upon Prussia’s throne. Below the inscription is a crowned Hohenzollern Eagle with outspread wings (the symbol of the House of which Frederick was the head). The spoon’s bowl is quite large and would enable one to spoon up a goodly amount of food onto one’s plate. The bowl’s reverse features a manufacturer’s hallmark. The spoon dates from prior to 1870.
$225.00   

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20-345 DESK PLAQUE - METAL - KAISER WILHELM II. This is a very sturdy and handsome metal desk plaque features a high-relief profile of Kaiser Wilhelm II. It measures 5 ½ " x 7 ½." The Kaiser’s image was stamped onto a metal (probably steel) blank. The plaque’s reverse reveals his stamped out image, as well as a manufacturer’s hallmark. The reverse also features an easel for displaying it on a desk or other flat surface. It is very well made, and would look most impressive on your desk, bookcase, or side table. $195.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23-500 SHOULDER BOARD - M-1915 - GENERALMAJOR a.D. - SCHUTZTRUPPEN. Today we are offering a shoulder board that is very rare on several levels. First, it is an M-1915 shoulder board intended for a feldgrau tunic. Second, it is for a Generalmajor a.D., which signified he was a General Officer in retirement. [The Imperial German Army commonly promoted an officer up one grade upon his retirement, which allowed him to receive a greater pension AND the prestige of a higher rank]. Third, and perhaps most important, it is for a General in the Schutztruppen. The Schutztruppen were primarily found in Imperial Germany’s colonial holdings, German East and Southwest Africa, and China, as well as the SeeBataillon. So for all of these reasons, this piece is a very rare bird.
The oversized shoulder board measures 2 ½" x 4 ¾." The shoulder board features the typical Russian rope bullion: two ropes of gold bullion separated by one subdued silver bullion rope. The silver bullion rope features large black chevrons that confirm its status as a Prussian shoulder board. Some smaller chevrons appear on the gold bullion.
The shoulder board’s reverse has a red felt underlay, as well as a tab that allows the shoulder board to slip onto a tunic. This is a very exciting and rare shoulder board, the first we have ever seen.
$895.00    

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23-501 SHOULDER BOARD - GENERALMAJOR - SCHUTZTRUPPEN. Today we are sharing with you a very rare shoulder board for a Generalmajor who served in the Schutztruppen. The Schutztruppen were primarily found in Imperial Germany’s colonial holdings, German East and Southwest Africa, and China, as well as the SeeBataillon.
The shoulder board measures 2 ¼" x 4 ½." It features the typical Russian rope bullion: two ropes of gold bullion separated by one rope of silver bullion that sports a thin blue trim of blue on its edges. Large black chevrons appear on the silver bullion, confirming its status as a Prussian shoulder board. The shoulder board’s center displays a gold-toned shield featuring a crowned Hohenzollern Eagle in its center that measures " x 1."
The shoulder board’s reverse has a red felt underlay, as well as a tab that allows the shoulder board to slip onto a tunic. This is a very exciting and rare shoulder board that is in mint condition. It is the first of its type that we have seen.
$895.00    

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

40-652 PHOTO ALBUM - WORLD WAR I/EARLY THIRD REICH - KAVALLERIE-REGIMENT 14. This is an interesting photographic combination of Imperial German military history with that of the Third Reich era and a Kavallerie Regiment’s transformation. The album, which measures ½" x 9" x 12," has a pebbled leatherette exterior. At its top we see an Army Swastika, along with the legend Kavallerie-Regiment 14 (both embossed on it in silver). During the Third Reich’s pre WW II era, Kavallerie Regiment 14 was what had once been Imperial Germany’s Husaren-Regiment Nr 16. The first part of the album (which concerns the Imperial German Army and Navy, with special emphasis on the German Army’s Kavallerie before and during the Great War) was preprinted information from the national veterans’ group to which the owner belonged.
The album was the property of Wachtmeister (a Senior NCO, primarily in the Kavallerie) Andreas Waldemar Fiebig. He served in Husaren-Regiment Nr 16 from 1908 through 1920. [At the end of 1920, Husaren-Regiment Nr 16 was dissolved, then reformed as Reiter (Kavallerie) Regiment Nr 14]. Two documents are included, the first is entitled "Honor Document of My Time of Service," and is not dated. The second is an Urkunde dated 1 January 1939. [They are both from the national veterans’ group. Fiebig belonged to the chapter located in Schleswig]. Following that are 8 typed pages from Fiebig concerning his service from his prewar days through WW I and beyond. He evidently was involved with some Artillerie Brigades toward the latter part of WW I, based on the typed account and some of the included photographs. He included a short paragraph about his postwar service, concluding with a salutation to Der Fuhrer and his signature, dated 1 August 1936.
A total of forty original photographs that cover prewar and wartime depictions of his fellow troopers and regiment’s officers follow Fiebig’s account. They are absolutely fascinating and are neatly identified in white ink beneath each photo. Some show mounted troopers, while others include shots of various types of artillery equipment. Some appear to include family members. A couple of interesting photos depict uniformed men sitting around a table relaxing. Veterans’ pipes and steins appear in front of them on the table. Along with the original photographs is a total of five postcards depicting some points of interest where the regiment spent time. A shot or two of the barracks where the regiment was garrisoned are included.
Interestingly, the artillery photographs show that the unit used a 42cm cannon. This cannon was also known as "Dicke Berta" (Big Bertha). [A misconception about Big Bertha is that it was the same as the Paris Railway Gun. In fact, the Paris Rail Gun fired considerably smaller shells than Bertha. The Paris Rail Gun fired 211/238mm projectiles a maximum distance of eighty-one miles (130 kilometers). Big Bertha was a more mobile weapon. It was transported by rail car and set up to fire off of it. Big Bertha was a 42cm (420mm) howitzer. It weighed forty-seven tons and lobbed an eighteen hundred pound shell 7.8 miles. Twelve different examples of Big Bertha were constructed by Krupp, the arms company that built most of WW I Germany’s cannons. They were used during the early part of WW I to destroy French and Belgian forts, including Liege, Namur, and Antwerp. The Paris Rail Guns were employed during the period of March through August 1918]. The photos show Big Bertha with and without gun crews. The soldiers are wearing stahlhelme, so the photos are post 1916 (when stahlhelme replaced the kugelhelme and pickelhauben). In addition to the photos and information on Big Bertha, one very rare photograph shows an actual Paris Rail Gun with the crew that served it. It appears to be semi-hidden by trees and under brush.
You will find this a most interesting bridge from Imperial Germany through the Great War, and some of the postwar changes undergone by a very proud cavalry section of the German Army.
$550.00   

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

33-340 BAVARIA - SCHIRMMÜTZE - OFFICER’S - FELDGRAU - 3. CHEVAULEGERS-REGIMENT. Today we are offering a very high-quality officer’s schirmmütze from Bavaria’s 3. Chevaulegers-Regiment Herzog Karl Theodor. The regiment was founded in 1724 (making it one of the oldest regiments in the Bavarian Army) and based at Dieuze, where it was attached to the Bavarian II. Armeekorps. A Chevaulegers-Regiment was a light cavalry unit that corresponded to Ulanen-Regiments. In the early days they were known for their use of lances. After the Napoleonic Wars (and the battlefield dominance of firearms and cannons), the days of lances and the küraß were numbered.
Our visor cap has the "saddle" look favored by Imperial German cavalrymen. It is a rather jaunty look. Its sides slope down to create this effect. The cap’s cover is made of feldgrau (field-gray) wool accented by a rose-red trim band that measures 1 ¾" in width. Matching red piping encircles the cap’s top. The correct Bavarian officer’s and Reich’s kokarden grace the cap’s front center area. Please note that the cap’s chin strap is still connected. As we receive and offer officer’s schirmmützen, we seldom get one with the original chin strap still attached, which makes this example extra special. It also boasts a high-quality black visor. Only one moth nip is visible toward the cap’s rear. Other than that, the cap’s exterior is in remarkable shape.
Its interior features a leather sweatband in top condition. A high-quality silk liner is also present. [At this point, we learn a bit of this schirmmütze’s history]. Stenciled on the silk liner is "Bayer. Staatsschauspiel M.G./19778510."  After WW I ended, many veterans (Including officers) sold or donated some of their uniform pieces to theaters/prop companies for use on stage or in film productions. [Have you ever watched the movie Sergeant York? All of its German uniforms and gear were originals]. The cap’s stenciled information indicates it came from the Bayer. Staatsschauspiel (Bavarian State Theater). The cap’s inventory number follows the theater’s name. Make no mistake, the cap is an original. It was effectively part of a living museum in which thousands of Bavarians witnessed its use in stage productions. The cap sports honest age and IS more than one-hundred-years-old.
$795.00  

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

04-431 OFFICER'S PICKELHAUBE – MILITARY ADMINISTRATION - PRUSSIA. This is a very fine example of an officer’s pickelhaube for a member of the Prussian Army’s Military Administration. The spiked helmet’s leather body finish is quite handsome. Some settling appears where the cruciform is attached at the helmet’s top. This happens occasionally due to the cruciform, spike, and et cetera’s weight settling into the leather body. Most collectors do not consider this a major problem, but, I wanted to mention it. It is depicted in greater detail in our attached photos.
The pickelhaube has a squared visor. At first glance, one might think it comes from a Dragoner-Regiment. I made this mistake until I was recently advised by a very experienced researcher from the U.K. that such was NOT the case. [We send our sincere thanks to GJ for the correction]! I also mistakenly identified the pickelhaube as being for a Dragoner-Regiment’s veterinarian. We always strive to give you a correct description. In many ways, the correction reveals that our helmet is even MORE desirable to collectors.

The broad category of "Military Administration" contains several different specialties to which this helmet could belong. Our expert identified several possible positions, which we have listed below.

 

*Technical Official from the War Ministry
*Military Intendance Official
*Military Justice Official
*Official of the General Staff
*Military Construction Official
*Senior Technical Official of the Military Institute
*Apothecary Official

 

Typically, these positions were NOT at the Regimental level. If they were for the General Staff, these officials were assigned to duties in Berlin. The other functions might also have been in Berlin, although some might have been employed at the Armeekorps level prior to the beginning of WW I (when the latter was the highest military formation within the Imperial German Army.
All of the furniture is silver with the exception of the four gilt officers’ stars. The helmet has a high-caliber wappen with a luscious, frosted finish. An official’s small, gilt, eagle has been attached to the wappen. The other silvered furniture is exquisitely appealing, with superb chin scales (all the leather behind the chin scales is present), cruciform, pearl ring, and a sharp-looking spike. The officer’s state and Reich’s kokarden are present as well. Inside, a leather sweatband shows moderate use. It also boasts a light-green silk liner in splendid condition. All the original hardware is present under that liner, with NO double holes where the wappen is attached.

This is a seldom-seen variety of pickelhaube in fine original condition. $2,695.00
 

 

At Der Rittmeister Militaria, we strive to bring you the best in spiked helmets, or pickelhauben (plural for pickelhaube), one of Imperial German Militaria’s most interesting areas for collecting. While ORIGINALITY and AUTHENTICITY are of prime importance, please do not forget Der Rittmeister’s commitment to CONDITION and QUALITY. In this regard, we take special pride in offering you spiked helmets whose condition is at least well above average, if not excellent. I examine hundreds of pickelhauben to find the very few that fulfill all four criteria mentioned above. Upon receiving their new treasure, collectors who have purchased one of our pickelhauben often exclaim that their helmet looks even better than the photos we had displayed on our website. [We do use a high-quality digital camera to photograph our items and upgrade cameras every two years, but enough with the Der Rittmeister Militaria commercial]! Just remember, dear friends, Der Rittmeister’s Four Critical Criteria for collecting pickelhauben: ORIGINALITY, AUTHENTICITY, CONDITION, and QUALITY.
The pickelhaube was designed in 1842 by Prussia’s König Frederick William IV for use in the Prussian Infanterie. [The Prussian king might have copied similar helmets adopted by Russia’s military during the same time period. It is not clear whether this was a case of imitation, parallel invention, or if both were based on Napoleonic cuirassiers’ helmets]. The helmet style was soon adopted by Germany’s other states and kingdoms during the mid-19th Century, with Bavaria being the final principality to implement it in 1886. [The Bavarians always seemed to go their own way! Interestingly, Bavaria was also the last to authorize kugelhelme for their Artillerie Regiments in 1913]. In addition to Russia, spiked helmets were adopted by many Latin American countries. They were even worn by the USA’s armed forces from the 1880's until around 1910.
We also remind all pickelhaube enthusiasts about our good friend Jim Turinetti’s excellent reference books on the subject (click here to see DRM’s Imperial German Headdress Page Nr 3), available as spiral-bound paperbacks or on CD. You cannot go wrong with them. I can safely state that Jim is the USA’s foremost authority on pickelhauben. Please support him. Dollar for dollar, these books are the best on the market, and reward you with an immeasurable return in value! [Remember, Jim receives any and ALL the profits from his works, Der Rittmeister Militaria just promotes them to help educate the collecting community].

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

04-723 IDENTIFIED ARTILLERIE REGIMENT MEDICAL OFFICER’S PICKELHAUBE - BADEN. If you read the title for this item, you are probably scratching your head. How can one have an Artillerie Regiment pickelhaube, shouldn’t it be a kugelhelm? [We should note, however, that Bavaria’s Artillerie Regiments did not convert to kugelhelme from pickelhauben until about 1913, and had delayed converting pickelhauben until about 1886 – the last German state to do so. This helmet is a different exception, and the facts behind it are even more obscure than the Bavarian situation, as you will learn].
This pickelhaube is for a doctor, a veterinarian who served in the 4. Badisches Feld-Artillerie-Regiment Nr 66. The regiment was raised in 1899 and garrisoned at Lahr. Like all Baden regiments, it was attached to the XIV. Armeekorps. Its leather body is in average condition with some areas of distress, especially on the right side. All of the helmet’s furniture is gilt, including the wappen, chin scales, spike, trim, officer stars, and so on. Its chin scales reveal why this artillery officer is wearing a pickelhaube! An Infanterie pickelhaube’s chin scales are flat. The chin scales on THIS helmet are vaulted, like those on Kavallerie helmets. The helmet’s original owner was a veterinarian (needed for cavalry units’ and field artillery units’ horses), so his chin scales were vaulted. It is also an identified helmet. Tucked into the silk liner we find a calling card for one Dr. Siebert that also identifies the regiment. The exterior’s final details are the correct officer State and Reich’s kokarden. [PLEASE NOTE: the State kokarde is a different pattern/ design than those found on Prussian helmets. Its more elegant pattern is seen on helmets from Baden, Württemberg, Hesse, and Saxony].
The pickelhaube’s interior features a well-used brown leather sweatband. Its silk liner is beige in color and in less than pristine condition. It exhibits shredding/running similar to what one might find in a silk stocking. All of the original hardware is in place under the silk liner, with NO double holes where the wappen is attached.

 

This is a 100% original pickelhaube. Although it is not quite in the condition that we prefer to offer, it remains a very unusual and scarce helmet. $4,295.00  

 

At Der Rittmeister Militaria, we strive to bring you the best in spiked helmets, or pickelhauben (plural for pickelhaube), one of Imperial German Militaria’s most interesting areas for collecting. While ORIGINALITY and AUTHENTICITY are of prime importance, please do not forget Der Rittmeister’s commitment to CONDITION and QUALITY. In this regard, we take special pride in offering you spiked helmets whose condition is at least well above average, if not excellent. I examine hundreds of pickelhauben to find the very few that fulfill all four criteria mentioned above. Upon receiving their new treasure, collectors who have purchased one of our pickelhauben often exclaim that their helmet looks even better than the photos we had displayed on our website. [We do use a high-quality digital camera to photograph our items and upgrade cameras every two years, but enough with the Der Rittmeister Militaria commercial]! Just remember, dear friends, Der Rittmeister’s Four Critical Criteria for collecting pickelhauben: ORIGINALITY, AUTHENTICITY, CONDITION, and QUALITY.
The pickelhaube was designed in 1842 by Prussia’s König Frederick William IV for use in the Prussian Infanterie. [The Prussian king might have copied similar helmets adopted by Russia’s military during the same time period. It is not clear whether this was a case of imitation, parallel invention, or if both were based on Napoleonic cuirassiers’ helmets]. The helmet style was soon adopted by Germany’s other states and kingdoms during the mid-19th Century, with Bavaria being the final principality to implement it in 1886. [The Bavarians always seemed to go their own way! Interestingly, Bavaria was also the last to authorize kugelhelme for their Artillerie Regiments in 1913]. In addition to Russia, spiked helmets were adopted by many Latin American countries. They were even worn by the USA’s armed forces from the 1880's until around 1910.
We also remind all pickelhaube enthusiasts about our good friend Jim Turinetti’s excellent reference books on the subject (click here to see DRM’s Imperial German Headdress Page Nr 3), available as spiral-bound paperbacks or on CD. You cannot go wrong with them. I can safely state that Jim is the USA’s foremost authority on pickelhauben. Please support him. Dollar for dollar, these books are the best on the market, and reward you with an immeasurable return in value! [Remember, Jim receives any and ALL the profits from his works, Der Rittmeister Militaria just promotes them to help educate the collecting community].

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

33-342 PRUSSIA - SCHIRMMÜTZE - RESERVE OFFICER’S - FELDGRAU - JÄGER-BATAILLON. This is an excellent Reserve Officer’s Prussian Jäger-Bataillon Schirmmütze. Jägers were the elite among all Imperial German Infanterie Regiments. In Napoleonic times, Germany’s Jägers (and their equivalents in the British Rifle Battalions) were their armies’ marksmen. They were the best shots, equipped with the most advanced weapons. The British Rifle Battalions were actually issued rifles rather than the then-more-common muskets. These enabled them to hit selected targets at a greater distance, with a higher degree of accuracy. They were served as skirmishers at their armies’ heads, and were trained to target officers to disrupt their enemies’ command and control over their troops.
The cap is made of feldgrau wool, with a bright green band that measures 1 ¾" in width. One very thin bright green piping band encircles the cap’s top, while another tops its central band. The correct Prussian Reserve Officer and Reich officer’s kokarden decorate the cap’s front center. Please note that the cap’s chin strap is still connected. As we receive and offer officer’s schirmmützen, we seldom get one with the original chin strap still attached, which makes this example extra special. It also boasts a high-quality black visor. As for the exterior’s condition, it exhibits two moth nips. Otherwise, the cap is in very pleasing condition.
Its interior is very near mint. A virtually unused leather sweatband and an exceptional gold silk liner are present. The cap’s metric size,"54," is stenciled on the silk liner. This means the cap is an about average size for the era. ["54" to "55" is about average; "56" to "57" is above average, while "58" and above is quite large. Only once in a great while do I see a "60."]
This wonderful feldgrau cap would make a fine addition to any collection or display.
$750.00   

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

02-445 MEDAL BAR - TWO-PLACE. This is a two-place medal bar. Its medals are listed below, beginning on the left.

 

1). Württemberg Silver Service Medal. The Silver Service Medal was presented from 1892 through 1918 during König Wilhelm II’s (1848-1941) reign. A higher class of the award was presented in gold. While the decoration was awarded during peacetime, it also served as Württemberg’s Iron Cross 2nd Class equivalent award during WW I. The decoration is silver-toned and measures 1" in diameter. Its obverse sports a high-profile image of Wilhelm II, along with the designation "Wilhelm II Koenig von Württemberg." The reverse displays the motto "Für Tapferkeit und Treue" (For Bravery and Loyalty) within a laurel leaf wreath.

2). Hindenburg Cross for Combatants with Swords.

 

The two decorations are displayed above their correct ribbons. Its reverse sports a black backing and a pin with which to attach it to a tunic. $175.00 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

04-739 PRUSSIA - WAPPEN - ENLISTED MAN/NCO - GRENADIER STYLE. This is a prewar enlisted man/NCO’s Grenadier-style wappen. [Grenadier-style wappen (also used on certain Dragoner and Jäger zu Pferde Regiments) feature Hohenzollern Eagles with outspread wings rather than the folded-in wings displayed on Line-Infanterie, Küraßier, Ulanen, Feldartillerie, Fußartillerie, and Train Battalion wappens]. As a prewar example, the wappen is made of brass. As WW I progressed, by 1915 wappens usually were made of steel that had been painted gray (subdued) to prevent sunlight glinting off them and betraying their wearers to enemy troops.
The wappen measures an impressive 6" wide from wingtip to wingtip. As it is for an enlisted man/NCO, the crown is closed not open (voided) as it would be for an officer. Its reverse sports two clips by which the wappen was inserted into its helmet’s leather body. Small pieces of leather inserted through these clips kept the wappen in place. These clips are another indication it is NOT an officer’s wappen. Officers’ wappens typically had screw posts attached rather than clips.  The example is in excellent condition.
$250.00 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08-572 HANSEATIC CROSS - HAMBURG. During WW I, most Imperial German states had equivalents to Prussia’s Iron Crosses 1st and 2nd Class. Today we are sharing with you the Free State of Hamburg’s 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class equivalent. Northern Germany had three "Free States," from what had comprised the Hanseatic League in earlier centuries. These included Hamburg, the largest of the three, Bremen, and Lübeck.
Hamburg’s Hanseatic Cross measures 1 ½" x 1 ½." The arms are made of red enamel. The decoration’s center features Hamburg’s Rathaus (city hall). [The building is a well-known Hamburg landmark. It was bombed out during WW II, then rebuilt afterwards using its original blueprints. Hamburg is a beautiful city filled with friendly and industrious people. Most of Germany’s major cities suffered extensive damage from American and British bombers during WW II. When the hostilities ceased, recovery began. By the 1960's most of the major damage in West Germany had been addressed. The German people’s hard work, combined with assistance under the "Marshall Plan," created a 20th Century renaissance]].
The decoration’s reverse is silver-toned and features the motto "Für Verdienst im Kriege 1914" (For Service in War 1914). A correct red and white ribbon is attached. This is a fine example in top condition.
$150.00 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

09-1025 IRON CROSS - 1914 - 1st CLASS - THREE-PIECE SCREWBACK - LOW-VAULTED - .925 SILVER HALLMARK. This is a lovely example of a high-quality, three-piece screwback, 1914 Iron Cross 1st Class. The Iron Cross’s obverse shows good paint, overall. Some wear is evident on the highest points of the "W" and the "1914." The frame exhibits a wonderful patina. The source of the patina is confirmed on the reverse by its .925 silver hallmark. This is an unusually high silver content. [The bulk of silver-hallmarked Iron Crosses only an .800 content level, and even those are unusual. ANY silver hallmarked Iron Cross constitutes a REAL plus].
The cross is also slightly vaulted. So, taking into consideration its low vault, silver content, and three-piece construction, it is a VERY special Iron Cross. Its reverse sports a backing plate and a nut to secure the other two pieces together (neither piece exhibits a silver hallmark). It is also worth mentioning that the Iron Cross is magnetic.
This truly is an officers-grade, privately-purchased, custom-made Iron Cross.
$595.00

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

09-1026 IRON CROSS - 1914 - 1st CLASS - PINBACK - LOW VAULT – CHARLES MEYBAUER.
Today we are offering a fine, low-vault, pinback, 1914 Iron Cross 1st Class from the workshops of Charles Meybauer. Meybauer was known to produce high-quality Iron Crosses and Prussian Flight Badges. The paint on its obverse rates at 100%. The frame’s patina is noteworthy. Its beading is even and crisp. Its reverse sports a sturdy swollen (coke-bottle) pin. This is always the mark of a top-quality pinback award. The Meybauer  hallmark is stamped in its center. It is a marvelous example of a custom-made, privately-purchased, 1914 Iron Cross 1st Class. [The Iron Cross also is magnetic].
We have seldom been able to offer a 1914 Iron Cross 1st Class from this particular manufacturer. $425.00 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

09-1027 IRON CROSS - 1914 - 1st CLASS - HIGH VAULTED - .935 SILVER HALLMARK. This is a true custom-made, privately-purchased 1914 Iron Cross 1st Class. It is a highly vaulted example, just about as highly vaulted as I have ever offered. The paint on its obverse rates at about 98% (the paint on the "W’s" highest point is a bit diminished). The frame displays a tremendous patina. Its beadwork is even and clean.
The reverse reveals why the obverse’s frame has such a great patina: a .935 silver hallmark. Any fineness of silver above .800 is highly unusual. While we see examples of .925, the only fineness above .925 is the VERY rare .950. [It is also worth mentioning that the Iron Cross is magnetic. Its pin is swollen (coke bottle).
You will be hard pressed to find a higher-quality 1914 Iron Cross 1st Class!
$595.00 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13-1035 MÜTZE - ENLISTED SAILOR - S.M.S. THUERINGEN. This is a high-quality, beautifully-conditioned, privately-purchased enlisted sailor’s mütze from the S.M.S. Thueringen. It was a Schlachtschiff (Battleship) that was launched in 1909, then commissioned after sea trials during 1911. She was one of the Heligoland Class’s four ships. The other three vessels were the class leader, S.M.S. Heligoland, the S.M.S. Oldenburg, and S.M.S. Ostfriesland. [The S.M.S. Ostfriesland has a place in history, since it later was tuned over to the American Army. It was used by General Billy Mitchell to prove that bombers could sink a large Navy ship]. At the outbreak of WW I, these ships formed Battleship Squadron Nr 1 of the Hochseeflotte (High Seas Fleet).

 

During the war, the S.M.S. Thueringen saw action in both the North Sea and the Baltic. She had her classmates served at the Battle of Jutland (Skageraak) on 31 May 1916. The Thueringen was undamaged during the battle and aided in sinking more than one British ship (including the H.M.S. Black Prince). After the war, she was not one of the ships that had to be turned over to the British at Scapa Flow since she was an older, NOT technologically advanced vessel. She was instead turned over to the French in 1920, used as a target ship, then eventually scrapped.
The mütze was privately-purchased, not depot-issued by the German Navy. The cap is dark-blue, which was considered the Winter issue. White was worn during the Summer months. An officer-style Reich’s kokarde is attached in the mütze’s center. A silver S.M.S. Thueringen cap tally is attached to the mütze. [PLEASE NOTE: We have referred to the ship as the S.M.S. Thueringen. It was actually the S.M.S. Thüringen, but the "ue" is used on the cap tally].

 

Have you ever wondered why some cap tallies are gold and others are silver? For those sailors who served aboard a ship, gold cap tallies were used by sailors assigned as seamen "upper deck" duty. Silver was used for the "lower deck" seamen who worked the technical stations (engines, work divisions, etc.) aboard ship. So our sailor was a "below decks" man. The tally is in beautiful condition and is attached very securely to the mütze. Inside the mütze is a well-conditioned leather sweatband. The black silk liner is in excellent condition. This sailor enjoyed a top-quality mütze, and so, preferred to buy his own headdress rather than accept one from the naval depot. $650.00 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13-1036 BINOCULARS - NAVY OFFICER. This is a compact pair of Navy officer binoculars. They were produced by Jena, a noted firm, which is stated on the binoculars’ left side. "Marineglas 440728 6X" appears on the opposite side. The strap is present, as is a leather cover that slips over the eyepieces. The optics are serviceable. This fine pair can be added to any Imperial German naval display. $125.00 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13-1037 FRAMED PHOTO - S.M.S. SIEGFRIED - LIFE PRESERVER SHAPED. The S.M.S. Siegfried was a Küstenpanzerschiff (Coastal Battleship). She and her class were the first German battleships. They had been authorized and were being built before Kaiser Wilhelm II came to power. [They were also the first German warships to have enclosed turrets]. The S.M.S. Siegfried was commissioned in 1890. She saw service in the German fleet until 1903. At that time newer battleships, and even Dreadnaughts, were coming into service. The ship was brought back in 1914 to be used for her original mission (coastal defense), while the newer battleships were used on the North Sea and the Baltic. By 1916, it was relegated to the status of a floating barracks. It was scrapped in1920.
Today we are offering you a photograph of the S.M.S. Siegfried. It appears in a frame made to replicate a life preserver. These frames were quite popular with sailors and their families. The frame measures 4 ½" in diameter. The photo within measures 3 ¼" in diameter. The wooden frame is red, with "Herbstübungsflotte 1901" painted in white at its top. The ship’s name, S.M.S. Siegfried, appears at the frame’s bottom. Four thin fabric bands appear around the frame. A thin rope is threaded around the frame, which could serve as a hanger at the frame’s top. It could be hung on a wall or just displayed as a decorative piece.
$95.00 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13-1038 FRAMED PHOTO - S.M.S. VINETA - LIFE PRESERVER SHAPED. The S.M.S. Vineta was considered a Große Kreuzer (Heavy Cruiser), the forerunner of the Hochseeflotte’s battle cruisers. The ship was commissioned in 1899 as one of the Viktoria Luise Class’s five ships. [Viktoria Luise was Kaiser Wilhelm II’s only daughter, who married Braunschweig’s Herzog Ernst August]. The ship saw service in the West Indies, South America, Africa and even made port in the USA at New Orleans, Louisiana, and Newport News, Virginia. She also occasionally accompanied the Kaiser as an honor vessel when he summered in Norway aboard his royal yacht, the S.M.S. Hohenzollern.
All of the Viktoria Luise Class’s five ships underwent modernization between 1905 to 1910. Part of the latter process was converting from three funnels to two. Our photo shows the ship with its original three funnels, indicating that it dates prior to 1905.
When WW I began, the Vineta was assigned to coastal defense in the Baltic under Großadmiral Prinz Heinrich’s command (he was Kaiser Wilhelm II’s younger brother). She did not serve in this role for long, then was anchored at Kiel to serve as a floating barracks for U-Boot crews while they were in port. She was scrapped in 1920.
Today we are offering a photograph of the S.M.S. Vineta that is framed within a life preserver replica. These frames were quite popular among sailors and their families. The frame measures 4 ¾" in diameter, while the photo within measures 3 ½" in diameter. The wooden frame is red, with "S.M.S." painted in white at the top. The ship’s name, "Vineta," appears at the frame’s bottom. Glass protects the photograph. Four thin fabric bands appear around the frame. A thin rope is threaded around the frame, which could serve as a hanger at the frame’s top. It could be hung on a wall or just displayed as a decorative piece.
$95.00 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13-1039 FRAMED PHOTO - NAVAL TRAINING SHIP - LIFE PRESERVER SHAPED. A note that refers to this ship as "Rover" appears on this framed presentation’s reverse. Further information on the tag states "Schiffsjungen-schuerschiff 1863-1890 Kgl. Preuß. Marine," indicating that the vessel, a two-masted sailing ship, was used by the Prussian (later the Imperial German) Navy from 1863 to 1890 as a training ship for young naval candidates.
[The Navy was a very low priority during Prussian King Wilhelm I’s (later Germany’s first Kaiser) reign. As far as Wilhelm I, Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, and General Staff Chief and architect of Germany’s modern Army Helmuth von Moltke (the Elder), the Army was of SUPREME importance. Since the German Navy operated primarily in the North Sea and the Baltic, with few forays into other oceans, they felt that coastal defense ships were more than adequate. This all changed, however, when Wilhelm II assumed the throne in 1888. In his desire for Germany to become a world player with both an Army AND a Navy to back it up, he soon set the stage for WW I].
Today’s offering is a photograph of the Rover that is framed within a life preserver replica. These frames were quite popular among sailors and their families. The frame measures 4 ½" in diameter and the photo within measures 3" in diameter. The wooden frame is white, with "328" painted in black at its top (this may refer to its training class). "Kgl." appears at the nine o’clock position we see, at the three o’clock position we see "Marine," and a fouled anchor is at the six o’clock position. A glass cover protects the photograph. Four thin fabric bands appear around the frame. A metal eyelet has been screwed into the top to serve as a hanger. This is the oldest item that we have ever offered from the German Navy.
$95.00 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14-449 1912 TABLE MEDAL - AUSTRIA - FLYING CLUB. This is a large-format table medal dated 1912 from an Austrian flying club. The Wright Brothers made their first successful airplane flight at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina in 1903, just nine years prior! Flying was still in its infancy and WW I was still two years in the future when the table medal was struck. Yet many prominent German and Austrian aviators already had laid the groundwork for how airplanes would revolutionize modern warfare. Soon, airplanes and other such technological breakthroughs as machine guns, superior long-range artillery cannons and tanks would catapult mechanized warfare to unthinkable new levels of destruction.
The table medal is quite large and measures 0.5 × 4.1cm (3/16" × 1 "). Its obverse depicts a winged female Spirit of Flight soaring over the countryside. The legend "K.(aiserlich)K.(öniglich) Österr.(eich)" (i.e., Imperial Austrian) appears to the left of the Spirit, while "Aero Club" is to the right. A plaque beneath her reads "Wien, Juni 1912" (Vienna, June 1912). The word "Bronze" is inscribed on the medal’s edge. The medal’s reverse gazes down on a pilot and his passenger in an Enrich Taube (very similar to the German Army’s Rumpler Taube monoplane) flying over a cityscape boasting a cathedral (complete with steeples) in its center. An identical example of this medal is on display in Washington, DC’s Smithsonian Air and Space Museum.
Early aviation pieces like this are difficult-to-find, since they were produced in limited quantities.
$150.00 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15-691 XRH BAVARIA - ULANKA - PARADE - LEUTNANT - ULANEN/CHEVAULEGERS REGIMENT. This is a consignment item. It is an exceptional ulanka that would be correct for any of the Bavarian Regiments listed below.

 

1. Ulanen-Regiment Kaiser Wilhelm II.
1. Chevaulegers-Regiment Kaiser Nicholas von Rußland.
3. Chevaulegers-Regiment Herzog Karl Theodor
.
5. Chevaulegers-Regiment Erzherzog Friedrich von Österreich
.
7. Chevaulegers-Regiment Prinz Alfons
.

 

 

These two Bavarian Kavallerie types (Chevaulegers and Ulanen) were considered light cavalry. [They were designated Lancers in the Imperial British Army, due to the lances that they originally carried]. Both types sported ulankas, as did Prussia’s, Saxony’s, and Württemberg’s Ulanen Regiments. The ulanka was far different from all other Imperial German Army tunics. Its front was decorated with a double row of buttons that formed a "V" shape. This not only slimmed its wearer’s torso, but made his shoulders appear broader and his overall appearance more muscular.

 

The ulankas worn by the Prussians, Saxons and Württembergians were dunkel-blau (dark-blue) in color up until the wartime conversion to feldgrau tunics. The Bavarian Army’s Ulanen, however, sported very dark-green ulankas. [PLEASE NOTE: it is such a dark green that it appears black in the accompanying photographs]. For this particular tunic, its contrasting trim and lapel lining is crimson-red. The prerequisite double row of fourteen (seven per side) gold-toned buttons decorate the front. A single button appears on each cuff. A further six (three per side) appear on the rear vent flaps. Crimson trim runs down from the reverse’s shoulder area to highlight the vent. A smaller gold button secures each epaulette to the ulanka’s shoulders.

 

 

The collar, cuffs, and trim are all crimson, serving as accents against the tunic’s dark-green background. Since our ulanka is set-up in parade configuration, its shoulders are mounted with epaulettes rather than everyday/garrison-use shoulder boards. The crimson epaulettes sport gold metal crescent moons and gold trim. NO regimental designation is indicated, as is correct.

 

 

The ulanka’s interior reveals a beautiful, black, silk liner. The tunic’s overall condition is beyond excellent. You will be hard-pressed to find a better officer’s parade tunic, and upgrading will never be a concern. $1,895.00 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15-692 XRH PRUSSIA - TUNIC - SENIOR NCO - KAISER FRANZ GARDE-GRENADIER-REGIMENT NR 2. This is a consignment item. It is a Senior NCO’s Kaiser Franz-Garde-Grenadier-Regiment Nr 2 tunic. This proud regiment was raised in 1814 during the Napoleonic Wars and named for Franz, Kaiser Franz Josef’s predecessor as Austro-Hungarian Emperor. It was garrisoned in the capital city of Berlin and, like all Garde-Regiments, assigned to the Garde-Korps.

The dunkel-blau tunic dates from about 1900. A total of eight gold-toned brass buttons run down the tunic’s center. A set of sewn-in loops for a three-inch wide ribbon bar appears on its left breast. The tunic sports kragenspiegel (collar patches) made of white cotton laid over a red felt/or wool background. Handsome gold bullion tape trims the collar, indicating the wearer’s NCO status. The same gold bullion tape appears on the cuffs, as well as three white/red patches of the same design as the collar’s kragenspiegel, each decorated with a gold-toned brass button.

 

 

The shoulder straps’ base color is red. Each strap’s center features Kaiser Franz’s royal cypher chain-stitched in yellow. A small brass button secures each shoulder strap to the tunic. Each button displays a "1" in its center indicating it is for Kompagnie Nr 1, the regiment’s honor kompagnie. The tunic’s reverse reveals six more gold buttons in its vent/flap area.

The tunic’s interior shows that its original liner has been removed. If this tunic has a fault, this is it. [The following is a speculation on my part]. Perhaps the lining was in such poor shape that a previous owner opted to remove it. The removal was neatly done, and reveals the tunic’s original, dark-blue wool material. Also, three of the buttonholes have been reinforced with leather patches on the interior. I have never seen this before. Although the lack of an interior liner is a factor, in reality, one rarely sees a tunic’s interior when it is on display. Greater consideration must be directed to the exterior.
This is a fine example of a prewar tunic worn by an NCO of a well-known Grenadier-Regiment.
$1,495.00 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15-693 PRUSSIA - LEATHER BELT AND BUCKLE - ENLISTED MAN - PREWAR ISSUE. This is a Prussian enlisted man’s pre WW I leather belt and buckle. [Once WW I began, the use of brass for buckles was curtailed because the metal was needed for artillery and bullet casings]. It is complete and ready to display or wear (if your waist is small enough). The belt’s size ranges from 36" to its most expanded length of 40." The leather belt is in good condition. The buckle has an un-dented crown in the center, although one small depression appears elsewhere. $225.00 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15-694 PRUSSIA - LEATHER BELT AND BUCKLE - ENLISTED MAN - WARTIME ISSUE. This is a Prussian enlisted man’s WW I leather belt and buckle. Prior to WW I, buckles were made of brass. This example is silver-toned rather than gilt-toned steel. It is complete and ready to display or wear (if your waist is small enough). The belt’s size ranges from 38" to its most expanded length of 40." The leather belt is in good condition. The buckle has an un-dented crown in the center, although one small depression appears elsewhere.$195.00 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15-695 ETHIOPIA - BELT BUCKLE - OFFICER. This item is very different from our usual offerings. It came as a part of another deal that we made, so here it is! This belt buckle is for an Ethiopian officer. I am not sure what era it comes from, but it is clearly in the Imperial German style. It may well have been made in Germany for export. Its fire gilding is excellent and it still has its keeper. You can pop this on a leather belt and be the talk of your crowd. $25.00  asJuly17 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18-441 VETERAN’S STEIN - BRAUNSCHWEIG - HUSAREN-REGIMENT NR 17. Braunschweig, referred to as Brunswick by the English, was a small Duchy that served as an important trade center throughout much of Germany’s earlier history. Braunschweig’s Herzog Friedrich Wilhelm (1771-1815), whose father was a Prussian Generalfeldmarschall, participated in the 1806 Battle of Jena, which was a major defeat of Prussia by Napoleon Bonaparte. Friedrich Wilhelm’s father was killed in the battle, and Braunschweig was taken over by France. Friedrich Wilhelm then fled to England in order to begin raising troops. After he had raised about 2,200 men, Friedrich Wilhelm returned to fight against Napoleon in 1809 with England’s Duke of Wellington.

 

Friedrich Wilhelm formed both a Hussar Regiment and an Infanterie Regiment from his recruits. [The Hussar Regiment eventually became Husaren-Regiment Nr 17, while the Infanterie Regiment became Infanterie-Regiment Nr 92. Both regiments eventually became famous for wearing the infamous Totenkopf (Death’s Head) on their headdresses. They also retained their black "mourning" uniforms until the switch to feldgrau in WW I]. Friedrich Wilhelm’s men became known  as the "Black Brunswickers" because they wore black uniforms as a sign of mourning for their homeland’s takeover by France. Friedrich Wilhelm soon became known as the "Black Duke." Although his troops were decimated in Spain and Portugal, the Black Duke refused to give up and refitted his regiments.

 

When Napoleon escaped from his exile to Elba in 1815, Friedrich Wilhelm joined the allied forces rallying once more under Wellington’s command. This ultimately led to Bonaparte’s defeat on 18 June 1815 at the Battle of Waterloo. Two days prior to that victory, however, was the Battle of Quatre Bras. During this bitterly contested battle, the Black Duke was mortally wounded while leading his Hussars in a charge.
Braunschweig swore fealty to the Kingdom of Hannover later in the 19th Century. The Duchy and the Kingdom of Hannover were assimilated into Prussia following the defeat of Austria and her allies in the 1866 Austro-Prussian War. Husaren Regiment Nr 17 eventually gained fame for their actions in the 1870/1871 Franco-Prussian War and were later allowed to decorate their headdresses with battle bandeaux from the Napoleonic Wars, including those for "Peninsular, Sicilien, Waterloo, and Mars La Tour."

 

With that brief summary of Braunschweig’s history, we turn to the impressive Husaren Regiment Nr 17 veteran’s stein that we are offering today. It stands an impressive 10 ½" tall. It measures 3" in diameter just under its lid, and 4" in diameter at the stein’s base. The stein’s center features a Braunschweig Hussar at full gallop. He is wearing his parade plume and his black attila with yellow braid. [What attention to detail]! The rider is framed within a circle of multicolored flags that are capped with Braunschweig’s Ducal Crown. The crossed flags of Germany and Braunschweig appear below the rider. Between these flags is a blue and yellow shield emblazoned with "5. Eskad." Two bandeaux that specifically mention Husaren-Regiment Nr 17 flank the shield. The various troopers from Eskadron Nr 5 have their names listed on either side of the frame. The veteran’s name, Quintel, appears in the area above the stein’s center. He served in the regiment from 1896 to 1898. It is quite possible that he rejoined a Braunschweig unit during WW I. Assuming that he was twenty in 1896 (the normal age for German military service), he would have been thirty-eight at WW I’s outbreak.
Two additional panels flank the central one. To its left, we see four troopers at a full gallop, while on the right a trooper has stopped in front of a house to bid farewell to his loved one as troopers disappear into the distance.

 

The stein is topped with a very detailed pewter lid. A trooper astride a rearing horse decorates its top. The trooper wears his busby, complete with its parade plume. A number of military motifs, including cannons and even an 1870 Iron Cross, decorate the lid beneath the trooper. The stein’s thumb device is in the shape of an uncrowned eagle. When one uses that device to open the stein and hold it up to light, a lithopane is revealed depicting an older couple in traditional dress. The man is seated and the woman is bending over toward him, perhaps offering him a drink.
The stein is the standard .5 litre size. The colors are amazingly vibrant for being nearly one-hundred-twenty-years-old. The stein’s only flaw is a chip at the base. Since this is the strongest part of the stein, no structural issues are involved.

 

This is a very rare stein from one of Germany’s most legendary cavalry regiments. It participated in major campaigns in multiple wars. Then, like all other cavalry units, ended WW I serving in the trenches dismounted from their beloved horses. $1,050.00 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19-285 POSTCARD - AUTOGRAPHED - GENERALOBERST ALEXANDER VON KLUCK. Alexander von Kluck (1846-1934) was a Generaloberst (Colonel General) during WW I’s early stages. [A Generaloberst was the equivalent of a four-star U.S. Army General]. He first entered the Prussian Army in 1865. He served during the 1866 Austro-Prussian War, as well as the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian War, during which he was wounded twice and awarded the 1870 Iron Cross 2nd Class. He was knighted in 1909, becoming Alexander von Kluck, then continued to steadily progress through the Imperial German Army’s ranks. In 1914 he was promoted to Generaloberst from General der Infanterie.
Prior to the buildup for WW I, an Armeekorps was the Imperial Germany’s largest military organization (although Armees had been created for the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian War). This was in accordance with the von Schlieffen Plan attributed to Generalfeldmarschall Graf Alfred von Schlieffen, the Chief of the General Staff from 1891 to 1906. Von Schlieffen had observed the 1905 Russo Japanese War and came up with a strategy to avoid a possible two-front war against France and Russia. Realizing that the Russian military was weak, von Schlieffen’s plan called for two German Armees to sweep through Belgium and knock France out of the war by quickly capturing Paris. This would take place before the British could muster a big enough army on the continent, and before Russia could effectively enter the war. It was not used when von Schlieffen was in power, but remained as a strategy if another war developed with France.
So, during the pre WW I buildup, Berlin’s General Staff created two Armees from the various Armeekorps. When the war began, the German I. Armee’s command was given to von Kluck. The II. German Armee was commanded by Generaloberst Karl von Bülow. Von Kluck was by far the more aggressive commander, while von Bülow was more conservative. Once the plan was enacted, poor communication, interference from Berlin, and lack of aggressiveness by von Bülow caused problems. Instead of the quick victory von Schlieffen had projected, (although von Kluck was within thirteen miles of Paris at one point), the campaign devolved to the first Battle of Marne in September 1914. Eventually, this led to both sides staking out territory protected by trenches, and four years of trench warfare, no real movement of the lines, and millions of lives lost.
Von Kluck was considered not only an aggressive, but a fearless commander. While inspecting forward areas in March 1915, he received numerous wounds from shrapnel. Von Kluck received the Orden Pour le Mérite on 28 March 1915. He had a son killed that same year, then went into retirement, never receiving another command. After the war he wrote his memoirs, questioning the lack of cooperation between von Bülow and Berlin, which led to defeat instead of a clear-cut, early German victory.
Today we are offering you a postcard signed by von Kluck. The postcard is a pen and ink portrait of him. He is a stern, no nonsense looking man. He is everything that you would expect a Prussian General to look like. His very bold signature in black ink appears across his chest. The postcard has been matted onto a piece of pasteboard that measures 6 ½" x 4 ½." It could be popped right into a 5" x 7" frame for a fine display. The card and signature are excellent and show one of Germany’s earliest WW I military commanders.
$175.00 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19-283 XKG CUSTOM-FRAMED NAVAL ADMIRAL PATENT & PHOTOGRAPH SIGNED BY PRESIDENT THEODORE ROOSEVELT. Theodore Roosevelt is among the most revered United States Presidents. He served in many governmental roles, such as the Assistant Secretary of the Navy in 1897. When war broke out with Spain in 1898, he resigned and formed the Rough Riders in concert with Col. Leonard Wood. [Wood had won the USA’s Medal of Honor for action against the Apaches, and later served as the U.S. Army’s Chief of Staff]. The Rough Riders were (also known as the 1st U.S. Volunteer Cavalry or 1.U.S.V.). During the campaign Wood, its founding regimental commander, assumed the Brigade’s command after its assigned commander fell ill. Roosevelt then was promoted to colonel, took command of the regiment, then led it on the famous charge up San Juan Hill.

 

 

[PLEASE NOTE the following side notes: the 10th U.S. Cavalry regiment was a flanking regiment consisting of African-American troopers under white officers. Also known as "Buffalo Soldiers," they had fought Indians in the American West, with John J. ("Black Jack") Pershing as one of their officers. Pershing later commanded U.S. Army troops in France during WW I. Theodore Roosevelt finally received the Medal of Honor in 2001 from President Bill Clinton for his actions during the Spanish-American War. Roosevelt had been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1906. Both his Medal of Honor and Nobel Peace Prize are enshrined in the White House’s "Roosevelt Room." Finally, Roosevelt’s son, Brigadier General Theodore (Ted) Roosevelt, Jr. (1887-1944) received the Medal of Honor for his actions during the 6 June 1944 Invasion of Normandy. He went ashore with the first wave of American troops onto Utah Beach. Just thirty-six days later he died of a heart attack].
Following the Spanish-American War’s end, Roosevelt returned to New York and became its Governor. He was elected Vice President to William McKinley when the latter ran for his second term. McKinley won the election but was assassinated in 1901, resulting in Roosevelt becoming the 26th U.S. President. He filled out the balance of McKinley’s second term, then won a full term of his own in 1904. Roosevelt was a reformer who pushed for change and became well known for his battles with monopolies formed by the U.S. banking, steel, and oil companies. He gained the nickname of "Monopoly Buster" for these hard-fought bitter battles.
Roosevelt was also a proponent of making the U.S. a world power. At the time, the U.S. and Japan were both emerging powers of increasing influence when compared to Europe’s powerhouses Great Britain, and Germany, followed by France and Russia. Following the 1898 defeat of Spain, the U.S. had acquired foreign possessions in Asia. Roosevelt now implemented his "Big Stick" diplomacy in order to project the USA’s naval and political power. To that end, Roosevelt sent the U.S. Navy’s strongest ships (the "Big Stick") on an extended worldwide cruise. The fleet (essentially the Atlantic Squadron), went on what turned into a fourteen-month, 43,000 nautical mile voyage, with some 14,000 American sailors aboard sixteen battleships. This became known as the Great White Fleet (since the ships had been painted in their normal white Summer livery with gilt, red, white, and blue accents at their bows). They were a pre-dreadnaught variety, but a powerful fleet nonetheless.
The fleet was assembled in December 1907 at Hampton Roads, Virginia, then proceeded to the West Coast for refitting before launching the Asian portion of the journey. The original commander of the fleet was Rear Admiral Robley D. Evans. Due to ill health, he was replaced on the West Coast by Rear Admiral Charles S. Perry. The fleet was broken down into four Divisions of four ships each. The commander of the 3rd Division, Captain Nathan E. (Kossuth) Niles (1849-1913), sailed aboard the U.S.S. Louisiana (BB 19). [The U.S.S. Louisiana was one of the fleet’s more modern ships and part of the Connecticut Battleship Class (the U.S.S. Connecticut was the Great White Fleet’s flagship). The U.S.S. Louisiana was commissioned in 1906 and stayed active until 1920, when she was struck from the list of Navy ships. The Louisiana was scrapped in 1923].

 

Since the U.S.S. Louisiana was one of the fleet’s modern ships, she was commanded by one of the Navy’s more experienced captains, the acting Commodore of the 3rd Division. Niles first joined the Union Army (yes, Army) during the Civil War in 1864 as a member of the 142nd Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment. The following year he was posted to the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland as a cadet. His naval career extended from 1865 until 1911, when he reached the mandatory age of retirement. He was buried at Arlington National cemetery following a fatal heart attack at a New York book store in 1913.
The Great White Fleet’s cruise consisted of four legs. Earlier legs had included stops in the Caribbean, South America, Australia, and Japan. The cruise was intended to particularly impress Japan that the U.S. was a major world player with an impressive naval force that should be treated respectfully in the Pacific. The fleet made port at Yokohama where it was received hospitably. The fourth and final leg began at in Manila at the USA’s Subic Bay naval base. The fleet arrived on 7 November 1908, then departed on 1 December 1908. It made port in Ceylon, Egypt (exiting through the Suez Canal), then Gibraltar, before returning to Hampton Roads. During the stop in Manila, Niles received word that President Roosevelt had promoted him to Rear Admiral.
It is THIS very promotion document (termed a "patent" in Imperial Germany) we are offering today. Such documents were extremely ornate during that period. The document was prepared on 12 November 1908. Niles’ actual promotion from Captain to Rear Admiral, however, occurred on 27 November 1908, just days before the fleet began its homeward leg. Thus, before the fleet’s departure on 1 December, Niles was confirmed to Flag rank. The actual document was waiting for him upon his return to Hampton Roads.

 

The patent measures 15" x 17." It was folded at some point, and the fold remains visible. That said, the document is in excellent condition with no foxing, tears, rips, or etc. It is as handsome as it was more than one-hundred-years ago when it was issued and signed by Theodore Roosevelt. Roosevelt’s name appears atop the preprinted document in large letters. The document states that Niles was promoted to Rear Admiral effective 12 November 1908. Theodore Roosevelt’s very bold signature appears at the document’s bottom. The document is countersigned by the Secretary of the Navy, Victor H. Metcalf (1853-1936). He served in that capacity from 1906 through most of 1908. Metcalf officially retired effective 1 December 1908, so this was one of his final acts as Secretary of the Navy. The document is also countersigned by the Registrar of the United States. A blue foil seal bearing the U.S. Navy’s Coat-of-Arms appears on the document’s lower left side above the latter two signatures.
Flanking the document is one of Theodore Roosevelt’s most famous photographs. He stands with his hand on a massive world globe exuding a world leader’s stern confidence. His policies placed the USA firmly on the path to political and military dominance. With the election of Theodore’s cousin, Franklin D. Roosevelt, in 1932, the U.S. continued its rise to the pinnacle of world leadership by the conclusion of WW II.
[This document was framed for my personal enjoyment, so we spared no expense on the project. Due to the frame’s size and the level of materials that I requested, it cost me nearly $1,000 to complete. I wanted to pay homage to the man I consider one of the greatest American Presidents. I felt that such an incredible piece of American history deserved nothing but the BEST. We accomplished the feat at a premiere framer in our area after spending more than hour selecting every detail of what you see presented in the accompanying photographs].

 

The overall frame measures a whopping 28" x 35." It requires a good-sized wall to properly display it! The frame’s molding is made of richly sumptuous burlwood instead of the gilt that often appears on high-end framing jobs. We wanted to evoke the ambiance one might have expected to find in the Captain’s cabin aboard the U.S.S. Louisiana. When properly polished, the burlwood simply glows the way a fine cigar does when lit and enjoyed.
The promotion document and Teddy Roosevelt’s photograph are double-matted inside two separate windows within the frame. The double-matte’s top layer is made of pale beige suede material imprinted with a slightly darker brown pattern that mimics that on the burlwood frame. As previously noted, the promotion patent measures an impressive 15" x 17." Roosevelt’s photograph measures 7" x 10." Each item is once more outlined with more burlwood trimmed on all sides with thin strips of elegant, black wood. Often matting is just colored cardboard, but that simply would NOT do for this presentation. When he finished the project, the framer begged me to allow him to display it in his store!
I have enjoyed this piece for many years. I was especially proud in 2008 when the 100th anniversary of the document’s signing came to pass. I am including some copies of photographs that will enhance the document’s history, which I have described below.

 

1. A group photograph of Captain Niles and other senior officers from the cruise of the Great White Fleet in their full-dress uniforms, complete with their fore-and-aft caps (Zweispitzen).

2. Another photograph of several Great White Fleet officers. They are posed in regular-duty uniforms and headdresses. It provides a closer look Captain Niles.

3. A photograph of a large group of officers at a garden tea party, including Captain Niles, held in Tokyo in 1908. A Japanese officer is in the front row.

4. A photograph of the U.S.S. Louisiana (BB19) as she appeared on the Great White Fleet’s cruise.

5. A photograph of Secretary of the Navy Victor Metcalf, whose signature appears on the document along with those from Teddy Roosevelt and the U.S. Registrar.

 

This magnificent presentation is ready for a new owner to enjoy. [Due to its size and weight, we will have it professionally packed in a custom carton to ensure its safe arrival to its new owner. Shipping costs will be quoted when you are ready to order]. $4,995.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10-878 XKG ANTIQUE PORCELAIN LICENSE PLATE - STATE OF FLORIDA - 1918. While this is a bit off the beaten path for us at Der RITTMEISTER Militaria, we thought you might enjoy sharing this bit of American history. In the USA, it has always been the responsibility of the individual states to issue automobile licenses. Today these plates are issued by the thousands and manufactured of stamped steel. Some U.S. states require a license at the front and rear of the automobile, while some states only require the rear plate.
In the early 20th Century, automobiles were still a new addition to American roads. Henry Ford, creator of the first automobile assembly line, changed who was able to afford and drive cars. With the advent of this manufacturing evolution, the average American could afford to buy and operate an automobile. In those early days, license plates were a good bit larger and were made of porcelain rather than metal. [Outdoor signage was also made of porcelain].
Today we are offering a porcelain license plate from the state of Florida. It is black in color and measures 6" x 15 ½" (much larger than modern license plates). In contrasting yellow lettering "1918" appears on the far left, while "FLA" appears on the right. In the center is the plate number, "12866-B." Imagine how many cars that Florida has on the road today and to have such a low number! Due to the plate’s size, it features four holes and two slots through which it could be attached to the license plate frame. Its overall condition is very fine. $550.00    

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10-879 XKG ANTIQUE PORCELAIN LICENSE PLATE - STATE OF CALIFORNIA 1914. While this is a bit off the beaten path for us at Der Rittmeister Militaria, we thought you might enjoy sharing this bit of American history. In the USA, it has always been the responsibility of the individual states to issue automobile licenses. Today these plates are issued by the thousands and manufactured of stamped steel. Some U.S. states require a license at the front and rear of the automobile, while some states only require the rear plate.
In the early 20th Century, automobiles were still a new addition to American roads. Henry Ford, creator of the first automobile assembly line, changed who was able to afford and drive cars. With the advent of this manufacturing evolution, the average American could afford to buy and operate an automobile. In those early days, license plates were a good bit larger and were made of porcelain rather than metal. [Outdoor signage was also made of porcelain].
Today we are offering a porcelain license plate from the state of California. It is red in color and measures 5 ½" x 16" (much larger than modern license plates). In contrasting white lettering "CAL" appears on the far left and on "1914" appears on the right. In the center is the plate number, "22349." Imagine how many cars that California has on the road today and to have such a low number! Due to the plate’s size, it features eight holes through which it could be attached to the license plate frame. Its overall condition is very fine. $350.00      

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

UNDER ARMS FOR THE KAISER:
Shoulder Insignia of the Imperial German Army's Regiments 1871-1918
by Michael A. Kelso.

Our very good friend Michael (Mike) Kelso recently published a superb book covering the Imperial German Army’s epaulettes and shoulder boards from 1871 through 1918 under its three emperors, Kaiser Wilhelm I, Kaiser Friedrich III, and Kaiser Wilhelm II. This particular area of our hobby has long been neglected. To my knowledge, NO other book dealing with this subject is available to collectors. While I have managed to gather some information from a few German books that partially deal with the topic, I have never found a standalone source to serve this purpose, until now.
Mike’s amazing book was released in early 2017. It already has the collecting community raving. Its scholarship and photographs are topnotch. We all owe Mike high praise for his efforts. We strongly urge you to purchase the book directly from Mike. It is a MUST-HAVE reference for any Imperial German militaria collection. You may contact him by email at
makelso77@aol.com. You will be glad you did!

 

We also have had the good fortune to purchase several examples of the shoulder boards and straps that appeared in Mike’s book directly from him. We will add a few in each new update over the next several months. Naturally, we will indicate on which of Mike’s book pages the shoulder board/strap can be found. The first examples appear below. 

 

 

23-482 SHOULDER BOARDS - PRUSSIA - OBERST - FELD-ARTILLERIE-REGIMENT - M-1915. This is a pair of Oberst’s M-1915 Feld-Artillerie-Regiment shoulder boards. They appear on page 375 of Under Arms for the Kaiser: Shoulder Insignia of the German Army’s Regiments 1871-1918, by Michael A. Kelso. Their obverses feature the pattern used by Majors, Oberstleutnants and Obersts. Each board displays a burnished, gilt-toned, Artillerie-Regiment’s flaming bomb. Each also displays a pair of gold-toned pips that flank the artillery designation and indicate they were for an Oberst who served as its regimental commander. The boards’ muted roping displays black and white chevrons identifying it as a Prussian unit.
Each board exhibits a red underlay that extends beyond its edges. The boards are of the slip-on variety that typified a field-grade officer (from a Major up to an Oberst). They would have been worn on a feldgrau tunic. While the shoulder boards’ obverses are in excellent condition, their reverses display a bit more wear. They are in very pleasing condition, overall. Being featured in this excellent reference book certainly enhances their value! $425.00  

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23-483 SHOULDER BOARDS - PRUSSIA - RITTMEISTER - ULANEN-REGIMENT NR 5. This is a pair of Rittmeister’s (a Hauptmann in non-cavalry regiments) shoulder boards from Westfälisches Ulanen-Regiment Nr 5. The regiment was founded in 1813 during the Napoleonic Wars. It was garrisoned at Düsseldorf and attached to the VII. Armeekorps. The shoulder boards appear on page 324 of Under Arms for the Kaiser: Shoulder Insignia of the German Army’s Regiments 1871-1918, by Michael A. Kelso. They measure 4 " x 1 ¼." They are pre WW I and feature a silver bullion surface with black chevrons confirming their Prussian origins. A gilt-toned "5" appears in the center of each board that confirms the regiment. Two gilt-toned pips appear above and below the regimental designation, indicating the rank of Rittmeister.
The shoulder boards’ underlay is white with black slip-on devices. Both shoulder boards are in excellent condition. Being featured in this excellent reference book certainly enhances their value! $250.00   

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23-484 SHOULDER BOARD – PRUSSIA – OBERLEUTNANT - 2. LEIB-HUSAREN-REGIMENT KÖNIGIN VICTORIA VON PREUßEN NR 2 - M-1915. This is a single Oberleutnant’s shoulder board from 2. Leib-Husaren-Regiment Königin Victoria von Preußen. The regiment was raised in 1741 and garrisoned at Danzig-Langfuhr, where it was attached to the Prussian XVII. Armeekorps. It was the sister regiment of 1. Leib-Husaren-Regiment Nr 1. It was famous for having Kaiser Wilhelm II, his son, Kronprinz Wilhelm, and Generalfeldmarschall August von Mackensen as members. All three were often seen in the fabled regiment’s uniform and headdress. [In fact, von Mackensen attended Wilhelm II’s funeral in the regiment’s uniform. Before leaving the casket that held his monarch’s remains, he laid his overcoat over it. The 2. Leib-Husaren-Regiment Königin Victoria von Preußen boasted as its most famous member (and à la Suite officer), Prinzessin Viktoria Luise, the Kaiser’s only daughter and eventual wife of Braunschweig’s Herzog Ernst August. [Viktoria Luise ( referred to as "Vikki Lu" in Germany) was also the granddaughter of Königin Viktoria (Queen Victoria of England’s eldest daughter) and Kaiser Friedrich III].
The shoulder board measures 1 ½" x 4." It is of the M-1915 variety for use on a feldgrau attila. It displays a single subdued Oberleutnant’s pip, as well as Königin Viktoria’s subdued cypher. Black and white chevrons also appear on the obverse. The sewn-in shoulder board’s reverse of is black. The shoulder board appears on page 269 of Under Arms for the Kaiser: Shoulder Insignia of the German Army’s Regiments 1871-1918, by Michael A. Kelso. It was cut from the attila at some point, but remains in very pleasing condition. Being featured in this excellent reference book certainly enhances its value! $225.00   

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23-485 SHOULDER BOARD - PRUSSIA - LEUTNANT - JÄGER ZU PFERDE REGIMENT NR 2 - M-1915. Jäger zu Pferde regiments were created in 1905. Thirteen total regiments (all Prussian) were created, the last in 1913. Jäger zu Pferde members were considered "hunters on horse." They wore a metal helmet similar in design to those of the Küraßiers. Although they did not wear the Küraßiers’ breastplates, they were considered heavy cavalry. In reality, even when the first Jäger zu Pferde regiment was created in 1905, the cavalry had been rendered obsolete and useless by the new machine guns. [This was proven true during WW I’s early days on both the Eastern and Western Fronts. Cavalry units were first limited to scouting, then ultimately served as dismounted infantry fighting in the trenches beside their infantry brethren. Their horses were relegated to moving artillery pieces about on the field].
This is a single Leutnant’s shoulder board from Jäger zu Pferde Regiment Nr 2. The regiment was founded in 1905 and headquartered at Langensalza. It was attached to the Prussian XI. Armeekorps. The shoulder board measures 4" x 1 9/16." This is a subdued obverse, in line with other feldgrau shoulder boards. It sports a subdued metal regimental designation ("2"). Black and white chevrons also appear on the obverse. The underlay features two layers, a red upper and a lower green one. Interestingly, the shoulder board a slip-on, which is a bit unusual for a junior officer. The shoulder board appears on page 340 of Under Arms for the Kaiser: Shoulder Insignia of the German Army’s Regiments 1871-1918, by Michael A. Kelso.
The shoulder board is in excellent condition and it is a real plus appearing in this book. Being featured in this excellent reference book certainly enhances its value! $225.00   

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23-486 SHOULDER STRAP - PRUSSIA - ENLISTED MAN/NCO - JÄGER ZU PFERDE REGIMENT NR 2. Jäger zu Pferde regiments were created in 1905. Thirteen total regiments (all Prussian) were created, the last in 1913. Jäger zu Pferde members were considered "hunters on horse." They wore a metal helmet similar in design to those of the Küraßiers. Although they did not wear the Küraßiers’ breastplates, they were considered heavy cavalry. In reality, even when the first Jäger zu Pferde regiment was created in 1905, the cavalry had been rendered obsolete and useless by the new machine guns. [This was proven true during WW I’s early days on both the Eastern and Western Fronts. Cavalry units were first limited to scouting, then ultimately served as dismounted infantry fighting in the trenches beside their infantry brethren. Their horses were relegated to moving artillery pieces about on the field].
This is a single shoulder strap for an enlisted man/NCO who served in Jäger zu Pferde Regiment Nr 2. The regiment was founded in 1905 and headquartered at Langensalza. It was attached to the Prussian XI. Armeekorps. The shoulder strap measures 5 " x " x 2 ." The surface of the strap is green. The regimental designation ("2") is chain stitched in red. The strap is edged in red as well. The reverse is also green. The shoulder board appears on page 340 of Under Arms for the Kaiser: Shoulder Insignia of the German Army’s Regiments 1871-1918, by Michael A. Kelso.
The shoulder strap is in excellent condition. Being featured in this excellent reference book certainly enhances its value! $195.00   

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23-487 SHOULDER STRAP - PRUSSIA - ENLISTED MAN/NCO - JÄGER ZU PFERDE REGIMENT NR 3. Jäger zu Pferde regiments were created in 1905. Thirteen total regiments (all Prussian) were created, the last in 1913. Jäger zu Pferde members were considered "hunters on horse." They wore a metal helmet similar in design to those of the Küraßiers. Although they did not wear the Küraßiers’ breastplates, they were considered heavy cavalry. In reality, even when the first Jäger zu Pferde regiment was created in 1905, the cavalry had been rendered obsolete and useless by the new machine guns. [This was proven true during WW I’s early days on both the Eastern and Western Fronts. Cavalry units were first limited to scouting, then ultimately served as dismounted infantry fighting in the trenches beside their infantry brethren. Their horses were relegated to moving artillery pieces about on the field].
This is a single shoulder strap for an enlisted man/NCO who served in Jäger zu Pferde Regiment Nr 3. The regiment was founded in 1905 and headquartered at Colmar I. E.. It was attached to the Prussian XV. Armeekorps. The shoulder strap measures 1 ¾" x " 5 ¼." The surface of the strap is green. The regimental designation ("3") is chain stitched in red. The strap is edged in yellow. The reverse is lined in yellow. The shoulder board appears on page 341 of Under Arms for the Kaiser: Shoulder Insignia of the German Army’s Regiments 1871-1918, by Michael A. Kelso.
The shoulder strap has some minor mothing on the obverse. More extensive mothing appears on the reverse, and the yellow underlay shows through in a couple of spots. Being featured in this excellent reference book certainly enhances its value! $195.00   

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23-488 SHOULDER BOARD - PRUSSIA - LEUTNANT - JÄGER ZU PFERDE REGIMENT NR 6. Jäger zu Pferde regiments were created in 1905. Thirteen total regiments (all Prussian) were created, the last in 1913. Jäger zu Pferde members were considered "hunters on horse." They wore a metal helmet similar in design to those of the Küraßiers. Although they did not wear the Küraßiers’ breastplates, they were considered heavy cavalry. In reality, even when the first Jäger zu Pferde regiment was created in 1905, the cavalry had been rendered obsolete and useless by the new machine guns. [This was proven true during WW I’s early days on both the Eastern and Western Fronts. Cavalry units were first limited to scouting, then ultimately served as dismounted infantry fighting in the trenches beside their infantry brethren. Their horses were relegated to moving artillery pieces about on the field].
This is a single Leutnant’s shoulder board from Jäger zu Pferde Regiment Nr 6. The regiment was founded in 1910 and headquartered at Erfurt. It was attached to the Prussian XI. Armeekorps. The shoulder board measures 1 ½" x 4." It sports a gilt-toned metal regimental designation ("6"). Black chevrons appear on the obverse. It has two layers of underlay. The upper is blue and the lower is green. Interestingly, the shoulder board is a slip-on, which is a bit unusual for a junior officer. The shoulder board appears on page 342 of Under Arms for the Kaiser: Shoulder Insignia of the German Army’s Regiments 1871-1918, by Michael A. Kelso.
The shoulder board is in excellent condition. Being featured in this excellent reference book certainly enhances its value! $225.00   

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23-489 SHOULDER STRAP - PRUSSIA - ENLISTED MAN/NCO - JÄGER ZU PFERDE REGIMENT NR 7. Jäger zu Pferde regiments were created in 1905. Thirteen total regiments (all Prussian) were created, the last in 1913. Jäger zu Pferde members were considered "hunters on horse." They wore a metal helmet similar in design to those of the Küraßiers. Although they did not wear the Küraßiers’ breastplates, they were considered heavy cavalry. In reality, even when the first Jäger zu Pferde regiment was created in 1905, the cavalry had been rendered obsolete and useless by the new machine guns. [This was proven true during WW I’s early days on both the Eastern and Western Fronts. Cavalry units were first limited to scouting, then ultimately served as dismounted infantry fighting in the trenches beside their infantry brethren. Their horses were relegated to moving artillery pieces about on the field].
This is a single shoulder strap for an enlisted man/NCO from Jäger zu Pferde Regiment Nr 7. The regiment was founded in 1913 and headquartered at Trier. It was attached to the Prussian XI. Armeekorps. The shoulder strap measures 2 ¼" x 5 ½." The surface of the strap is green. The regimental designation ("7") is chain stitched on it in red. The strap is edged in yellow. Its reverse is feldgrau. The shoulder board appears on page 342 of Under Arms for the Kaiser: Shoulder Insignia of the German Army’s Regiments 1871-1918, by Michael A. Kelso.
Some light scattered mothing shows on its obverse. The reverse shows a bit more mothing and its yellow underlay shows through at some points. Being featured in this excellent reference book certainly enhances its value! $195.00   

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23-490 SHOULDER STRAP - PRUSSIA - ENLISTED MAN/NCO - JÄGER ZU PFERDE REGIMENT NR 12. Jäger zu Pferde regiments were created in 1905. Thirteen total regiments (all Prussian) were created, the last in 1913. Jäger zu Pferde members were considered "hunters on horse." They wore a metal helmet similar in design to those of the Küraßiers. Although they did not wear the Küraßiers’ breastplates, they were considered heavy cavalry. In reality, even when the first Jäger zu Pferde regiment was created in 1905, the cavalry had been rendered obsolete and useless by the new machine guns. [This was proven true during WW I’s early days on both the Eastern and Western Fronts. Cavalry units were first limited to scouting, then ultimately served as dismounted infantry fighting in the trenches beside their infantry brethren. Their horses were relegated to moving artillery pieces about on the field].
This is a single shoulder strap for an enlisted man/NCO from Jäger zu Pferde Regiment Nr 12. The regiment was founded in 1913 and headquartered at St. Avold. It was attached to the Prussian XVI. Armeekorps. The shoulder strap measures 2 ¼" x 5 ½." The surface of the strap is green. The regimental designation (12") is chain stitched in red. The strap is edged in blue. Its reverse is feldgrau. A gold-toned button is attached to the strap. The shoulder strap appears on page 340 of Under Arms for the Kaiser: Shoulder Insignia of the German Army’s Regiments 1871-1918, by Michael A. Kelso.
The shoulder strap is in very fine condition. Being featured in this excellent reference book certainly enhances its value! $195.00   

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23-491 SHOULDER STRAP - PRUSSIA - ENLISTED MAN/NCO - ULANEN-REGIMENT NR 6. This is a single shoulder strap for an enlisted man/NCO from Thüringisches Ulanen-Regiment Nr 6. The regiment was founded in 1813 in the midst of the Napoleonic Wars. It was garrisoned at Hanau and assigned to the XVIII. Armeekorps. The shoulder strap appears on page 305 Under Arms for the Kaiser: Shoulder Insignia of the German Army’s Regiments 1871-1918, by Michael A. Kelso.
The strap measures 6 " x 2 9/16." Its surface is covered in dark-blue wool. Here, the strap gets interesting. Rather than having the regimental designation embroidered or screened on it, it features a silver crown above a silver-toned royal cypher. This leads me to the assumption that our man was an NCO, possibly the regiment’s senior NCO. The arrangement is quite unusual. I have only seen a handful of metal insignia on shoulder straps. The strap is edged in white. Its backing on the reverse is red. One can see the chain stitching where the insignia was stitched on the strap.
The strap exhibits some age. It sports a couple of small moth nips on the obverse, and the red backing shows some soiling. That said, it is an unusual and scarce example of this regiment’s shoulder straps. Being featured in this excellent reference book certainly enhances its value! $195.00   

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23-492 SHOULDER STRAP - MECKLENBURG-SCHWERIN - ENLISTED MAN/NCO - GRENADIER-REGIMENT NR 89. This is a single shoulder strap for an enlisted man/NCO from Großherzogl. Mecklenburgisches Grenadier-Regiment Nr 89, Bataillon Nr 1 and Nr 3. Bataillon Nr 2 was from Mecklenburg-Strelitz. Bataillon Nr 1 and Nr 3 were garrisoned at Mecklenburg, while Bataillon Nr 2 was located at Neu Strelitz. The regiment was founded in 1782 and attached to the IX. Armeekorps. The shoulder strap appears on page 87 of Under Arms for the Kaiser: Shoulder Insignia of the German Army’s Regiments 1871-1918, by Michael A. Kelso.
The strap measures 2 ½" x 5." Its background is white. The Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin’s royal cypher is emblazoned on it in red. Its reverse is dark-blue. A single moth nip shows on the obverse, while some very scattered moth tracking appears on its reverse. It is in good condition and from an important regiment. Being featured in this excellent reference book certainly enhances its value! $225.00   

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23-493 SHOULDER STRAP - BADEN - ENLISTED MAN/NCO - LEIB-GRENADIER-REGIMENT NR 109. This is a single shoulder strap for an enlisted man/NCO from the Grand Duchy of Baden’s 1. Badisches Leib-Grenadier-Regiment Nr 109. This regiment was the most important one in Baden’s military. As Grand Duchies, Baden and Hesse-Darmstadt were Imperial Germany’s two biggest military contributors after its four main Kingdoms of Prussia, Saxony, Bavaria, and Württemberg. The regiment was founded in 1803 and garrisoned in Baden’s capital city, Karlsruhe. It was attached to the XIV. Armeekorps. The shoulder strap appears on page 114 of Under Arms for the Kaiser: Shoulder Insignia of the German Army’s Regiments 1871-1918, by Michael A. Kelso. The strap measures 2 " x 6 ½." Its background is black with white trim around the edges. An embroidered red crown appears in its center. The strap’s reverse is also black. Its overall condition is excellent. This was one of the Imperial German Army’s premiere regiments. Being featured in this excellent reference book certainly enhances its value! $195.00   

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

33-338 PRUSSIA - KUGELHELM - OFFICER’S - FELDARTILLERIE - WITH SPECIAL WAPPEN. Prussian Feldartillerie kugelhelme sported three very different wappen-types that represented three vastly different regiments. The most common of the three wappens was intended for Line-Artillerie Regiments. [It was also shared with Line-Infanterie Regiments]. Its bandeau proclaimed "Mitt Gott Fur Koenig und Vaterland," with the initials "FR" directly underneath. The second wappen-type was used by Garde-Regiments and featured an impressive Garde Star that was displayed on ALL headdresses used by the various Garde-Regiments. The third wappen-type was used by only FOUR old-line, very elite regiments that were only slightly less prestigious than the Garde-Feldartillerie-Regiments: Feldartillerie-Regiment Prinz August von Preußen Nr 1 (founded in 1772), 1. Pommerisches Feldartillerie-Regiment Nr 2 (founded in 1808), Feldartillerie-Regiment General Feldzügmeister (1. Brandenburgisches) Nr 3 (founded in 1816), and Feldartillerie-Regiment von Peucker (1. Schlesisches) Nr 6 (founded in 1808). This wappen displayed an oval shield/device that featured the King’s cypher under the bandeau rather than the "FR." Their low regimental numbers were an indication of their importance, as well as how early they were founded.
The helmet’s leather body is in excellent condition. It received superb treatment from its original and successive owners for more than one-hundred years. Its leather is clean, clear, and supple. The beautifully-frosted gilt wappen is a delight to view. Its fire-gilding is excellent. All of the other furniture, including its chin scales, trim, base, officer’s stars, and kugel, is also gilt. The final exterior details are the correct Reich and State officer’s kokarden.
The helmet’s interior features a brown leather sweatband in magnificent condition. The rust-colored silk liner is complete and in excellent condition. The original hardware and fittings can be seen under the silk liner. NO double holes are present, a vital testament to the originality of any headdress.
The helmet comes to us from the collection of a very serious and knowledgeable longtime collector who has a sharp eye for quality, condition, and (of course) authenticity. I can say with complete honesty that its condition is EXCELLENT. I have not seen a kugelhelm in better condition than this example for a long time. You would be hard pressed to find a better helmet. It is fairly-priced and represents a solid value.
$4,295.00

 

At Der Rittmeister Militaria, we strive to bring you the best in the various helmets and headdresses that we offer, whether they are pickelhauben, or the Artillerie Regiments’ kugelhelme, specialized helmets that sported round metal balls instead of metal spikes. As with pickelhauben, while ORIGINALITY and AUTHENTICITY are of prime importance, please do not forget Der Rittmeister’s commitment to CONDITION and QUALITY. In this regard, we take special pride in offering you kugelhelme whose condition is at least well above average, if not excellent. I examine hundreds of kugelhelme to find the very few that fulfill all four criteria mentioned above. Upon receiving their new treasure, collectors who have purchased one of our kugelhelme often exclaim that their helmet looks even better than the photos we had displayed on our website. [We do use a high-quality digital camera to photograph our items and upgrade cameras every two years, but enough with the Der Rittmeister Militaria commercial]! Just remember, dear friends, Der Rittmeister’s Four Critical Criteria for collecting pickelhauben: ORIGINALITY, AUTHENTICITY, CONDITION, and QUALITY.
The kugelhelm was first introduced by the Kingdom of Prussia in 1843, following the introduction of the pickelhaube. [Both were designed by Prussia’s König Frederick William IV, who might have copied similar helmets adopted by Russia’s military during the same time period. It is not clear whether this was a case of imitation, parallel invention, or if both were based on Napoleonic cuirassiers’ helmets]. The kugelhelm’s use spread state by state and Kingdom by Kingdom after that date. The final Kingdom to implement the kugelhelm was Bavaria in 1913. [As usual, the Bavarians always seemed to go their own way]!
We also remind all kugelhelme enthusiasts about our good friend Jim Turinetti’s excellent reference books on headdresses (click here to see DRM’s Imperial German Headdress Page Nr 3), available as spiral-bound paperbacks or on CD. You cannot go wrong with them. I can safely state that Jim is the USA’s foremost authority on pickelhauben and other forms of Imperial German Headdress. Please support him. Dollar for dollar, these books are the best on the market, and reward you with an immeasurable return in value! [Remember, Jim receives any and ALL the profits from his works, Der Rittmeister Militaria just promotes them to help educate the collecting community].
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

05-1700 XML JEWELER’S/WEARER’S COPY - ORDEN POUR le MÉRITE - PRUSSIA. This is a consignment item. It was previously purchased from Der Rittmeister Militaria, and meets our exacting standards. We all know that the Orden Pour le Mérite (PLM) was the highest decoration that Prussia and Germany could offer to its officers. Enlisted Men and NCO’s were not eligible for the award. Instead, they had their own decoration that recognized extreme bravery in combat, often referred to as the "Enlisted Man’s Blue Max." [The PLM, or "Blue Max," is supposedly nicknamed that for Max Immelmann, the first WW I aviator to receive it. I have been asked over the years, why was Prussia and Germany’s top decoration given a French name? When it was created in 1740, during Friedrich der Große’s reign, the official court language was French. Friedrich considered the German language uncouth, and French to be more refined and cultured. He even modeled his primary Potsdam castle, Sanssouci, after the French Palace at Versailles].
Approximately seven hundred examples of the Orden Pour le Mérite were awarded during WW I from 1914 through 1918. No more examples were awarded after the war’s end. You will note that we have used the terms "Jeweler’s or Wearer’s Copy" for this PLM. I wish I knew of a better term for these decorations. In other words, this is a period PLM that lacks the provenance to offer it as a presentation piece. Traditionally, the provenance that allows a PLM (or any other high decoration) to be considered an "awarded" decoration comes in the form of an Urkunde (the official award document signed by the Kaiser or, in some cases, the Ordenskanzler), or some other documentation from the family of the man awarded the PLM.
For example, Godet & Sohn was one of Kaiser Wilhelm’s house jewelers who provided presentation PLM’s for nominated officers. Suppose that Godet had ten PLM’s in stock. They get the call from the Kaiser’s Ordenskanzler that five PLM’s are required for presentation by the Kaiser. Five are pulled from the stock and sent to the Ordenskanzler, who then arranged for five Urkunden to be signed by the Kaiser for presentation with the PLM’s. After receiving his award, one of the officers might decide he did not want to risk harming something that had been personally presented to him by his Kaiser, instead preferring to store it in a safe place. At the same time, however, the Orden Pour le Mérite statutes mandated that the recipient wear one on his uniform whenever he was out in public. The solution to this dilemma was for the officer to visit Godet & Sohn in order to purchase ANOTHER PLM for daily wear (he might even purchase two, just in case). [The same solution applied if the officer lost or damaged his PLM and required a replacement]. So Godet would pull another PLM from its inventory that was IDENTICAL to his awarded piece in every way. In this instance, no actual difference existed between the "Jeweler’s/Wearer’s Copy" and the actual awarded piece because they were constructed by the SAME company in the SAME manner.
So I use the term "Jeweler’s or Wearer’s Copy" only because I cannot present any supporting documentation to you. I have offered PLM’s in this manner for twenty years, with the exception of the very rare instance when I DID have provenance that I felt was sufficient to classify it as an "awarded" PLM. In point of fact, if a PLM is a period piece (NOT post war), NO actual difference exists between them.
This is what we are offering to you today, a "Jeweler’s or Wearer’s Copy." The decoration measures 2 ¼" x 2 ¼." It displays a handsome blue enamel surface on both the obverse and reverse. The obverse features the "Pour le Mérite" and Friedrich der Große’s crowned royal cypher in gold lettering (chased gold lettering, to be specific). A gold Hohenzollern Eagle nestles between each blue enamel arm. A pie-shaped suspension device is attached to a paperclip-like holder through which the decoration’s neck-ribbon was inserted. This pie-shaped device was used on early-to-mid World War I PLM’s. The VERY early-war examples actually were made of gold. As WW I progressed, gold soon was in short supply, so awards were made of silver that was covered with a gold wash, as was this example. A close examination of the pie-shaped device’s edge reveals a mark that reads "JguS .938." The latter attests that the decoration INDEED came from J. Godet und Sohn’s workshops and that the decoration is made of .938 silver beneath its gold wash. The obverse’s enamel finish is quite pleasing, with one very small dimple near the "P" that keeps it from being perfect. I actually like the idea that it shows some wear to it, which I classify as "honest age." The reverse is flawless.
A 100% correct ribbon accompanies the decoration. It measures 18 ¾" in length and is 2" wide. The ties at the end that allowed the decoration to be worn around the neck are NOT present. The ribbon is made of black silk, with two narrow silver bullion stripes, each of which measures ¼" in width. It has been quite some time since we have been able to offer a PLM of this quality and condition.  With the price reduction, this superb Pour le Mérite represents a truly excellent value.
$8,495.00 FINAL PRICE REDUCTION: $7,250.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

Links to Our Pages

 

Der Rittmeister Merchandise Pages: (Click on Pictures or Words)

Badges: Wound/Veterans/Shooting Prizes, etc.


Boxes (Patriotic) & Cigarette Cases

Bronzes/Busts/Statuettes & Figurines

Colonial Memorabilia
   

Desk Pieces & Accessories

Documents Nr 1: Awards AND Decorations
Included

Documents Nr 2: Patents, etc. (Paper Only)

Fan Gear (Der Rittmeister Militaria Clothing, etc.)

Field Gear & Soldiers' Personal Effects
 
Flags/Banners & Accessories

Flight Qualification Badges (Imperial)

Imperial German Air Service Nr 1:Artifacts,  Personalities, Groups, Shoulder Boards

Imperial German Air Service Nr 2: Documents, Books, etc.

Imperial German Regiment der Gardes du Corps & More

Imperial German Headdress Nr 1: Pickelhauben
/Wappens/Accessories

Imperial German Headdress Nr 2: Busbies/Mützen/Tschapkas/Visor Caps, etc.

Imperial German Headdress Nr 3: Reference Materials/Guides/CD's & DvD's

Iron Crosses & Related Materials

Just In from Germany: Newest Items! ALL items start here!

Medal Bars & Ribbon Bars

Miniatures & Boutonnieres

Navy (Imperial German): Documents/Swords/Daggers/Badges/Cap Tallies/Books

Orders & Decorations Nr 1: 4 Major German Kingdoms & Central Powers, Post War

Orders & Decorations Nr 2:Grand Duchies/Duchies/Free States, etc.

Paper & Wood Artifacts: Books/Photos/Albums/Maps/Artworks (framed paintings)

Patriotic Domesticware Nr 1: Fine Tableware/Steins/Glassware/Porcelain

Patriotic Domesticware Nr 2: Wooden/Metal/Cloth/Embroidered  Household Items
 

Patriotic Jewelry Nr 1: Rings/Bracelets/Pendants, etc.

Patriotic Jewelry Nr 2: Pins

Postcards Nr 38: German Royalty-Kaiser Wilhelm I/Kaiserin Auguste Viktoria ONLY

Postcards Nr 40: Photo Albums/Original/Framed/Cabinet Photos/Cartes Des Visite (CdV's).

Postcards Nr 42:Imperial German Air Service & All Aviation-Related.

Postcards Nr 43:Imperial German Armed Service & All Army-Related.

Postcards Nr 44:Kaiserliche Marine & All Navy-Related.

Postcards Nr 45:Other Imperial German/Central  & Allied Powers Royalty and Nobility

Ranglistes: Imperial German Army/Navy & Imperial German References on CD

Royalty & Nobility (German): Personalities, Swords/Daggers/ Portraits, Memorabilia

Shoulder Boards

Signed Photos/Documents/Autographs from German Military/Nobility/Royalty

 

Stickpins

Swords/Daggers/Edged Weapons & Accessories

Table Medals

Uniforms & Related Accessories

Vivat Ribbons

Wooden Display Products (Helmet & Visor Stands)

Zeppelin & Balloon Memorabilia

Der Rittmeister Content Pages:


Return to our Home Page
             

How to Order from Der Rittmeister Militaria

A Brief Intro
to Der Rittmeister Militaria
 
Information about Late Great Author & Painter Jack D. Hunter