Der Rittmeister Militaria, LLC. Imperial German Merchandise, Page 0: Just in From Germany, the newest items fresh from the Fatherland!  Updated on 13 December 2017.  
Contact us @:kgreenfield@derrittmeister.com

Click here for Links to our Merchandise & Content Pages. This is just a sample of  the wide variety of high quality items that we offer in our ever changing inventory!

 

 

ATTENTION!

If you want to be on our mailing list,  please send us an e-mail and ask to be placed on it. We notify our mail list members when we update our online "Just In From Germany" Merchandise Page. In addition, you will receive early notification when we add new items to any clearance pages (currently under revision). More importantly, we notify our list members when we have a sale. These sales are NEVER announced on our web site. They are for our list members ONLY. Be assured that we never sell or share your e-mail address with anyone. The list is only for our purposes as stated above.

Our e-mail address follows: kgreenfield@derrittmeister.com

 

Next Update:  9 January 2018

Our business phone number in the USA: 001 (727) 233-6173

 

 

04-747 XKA PRUSSIA - PICKELHAUBE - OFFICER’S - GRENADIER-REGIMENT NR 7 - WITH PARADE BUSH. This is a first time offering for us at Der Rittmeister Militaria: an officer’s pickelhaube from the very elite Grenadier-Regiment König Wilhelm I. (2. Westpreußisches) Nr 7, with its parade bush. The regiment was founded in 1797. It was garrisoned at Liegnitz (now Legnica, Poland) and attached to Prussia’s V. Armeekorps. Its Regimental Chef was none other than Prussia’s König (later Kaiser) Wilhelm I. [The regiment was founded the same year, 1797, as Wilhelm I was born, the importance of which we will share with you shortly].
The helmet’s leather body is most appealing. Its only flaw shows up on the helmet’s right rear three-quarters, where two small gouges appear very close to one another. They are not overly noticeable, because the parade bush masks the small flaw quite well, unless the bush is lifted up for inspection. Its wappen features a very attractive Grenadier-style eagle whose outspread wings extend greatly from its body (in direct contrast to a Line-Infanterie-Regiment’s closed-wing eagle). This wappen-style was used not only on Grenadiers’ helmets but for the various Garde-Regiments. The eagle’s wings extend almost to the kokarden’s midpoint.

 

 

The Grenadier-style wappen is only part of what makes this helmet so special. Near the eagle’s base it sports a wonderful bandeau that proclaims "22 März 1797,"  König Wilhelm I’s birth date. [This bandeau was unique among other German helmets. Bandeaux typically were awarded as battle honors for major battles or campaigns in which a regiment had participated. During the Imperial Period, most bandeaux were worn by regiments whose battle honors had been restored to them in 1897 by Kaiser Wilhelm II. Most of these regiments had been absorbed into the Prussian Army following the 1866 Austro-Prussian War. The battle honors primarily dated from the Napoleonic Wars. Wilhelm II’s 1897 gesture allowed the regiments (including some from Hannover, Braunschweig, and Nassau) to regain some of their former states’ prestige. Grenadier-Regiment Nr 7, as well as Füsilier-Regiments Nr 34 and Nr 35 were the only regiments whose bandeaux celebrated monarchs (the two Füsilier-Regiments acknowledged the Swedish Queen)].
All of the helmet’s furniture, including the wappen, chin scales, trim, etc., is gilt-toned. [PLEASE NOTE: Officer’s pickelhauben chin scales often are attached to the helmet by devices called rosettes. A special rosette boasting Kaiser Wilhelm II’s cypher was available as an option on this regiment’s helmet. It was the only regiment to be so honored, since it saluted the first Kaiser, along with a nod from his grandson Wilhelm II. This particular helmet does NOT have those rosettes. It remains ENTIRELY correct, despite the fact that many helmets in reference books sport the rosettes. Remember, the rosettes were an option and were NOT mandatory for Grenadier-Regiment König Wilhelm I. (2. Westpreußisches) Nr 7's pickelhauben]! The helmet’s parade trichter is also gilt-toned, and sports a marvelous, soundly-attached, full, black bush. NO spike comes with the helmet, just the trichter and parade bush. The correct State’s and Reich’s kokarden are attached.
The helmet’s interior features a high-quality, light-brown leather sweatband, with an attached, ribbed, light-beige, silk liner. A couple of small tears appear on the silk liner, but no major damage. It is in much better condition than the major shredding we often find. The hardware is all original, with the exception of one nut that does not match. The latter securely fastens the helmet officers’ stars. What is most important, NO double holes are present where the wappen is attached.
It is a fine pickelhaube in parade configuration from an elite regiment and would make an excellent addition to your collection. Its condition rates as very fine.
$6,995.00   

 

At Der Rittmeister Militaria, we strive to bring you the best in spiked helmets, or pickelhauben (plural for pickelhaube), one of Imperial German Militaria’s most interesting areas for collecting. While ORIGINALITY and AUTHENTICITY are of prime importance, please do not forget Der Rittmeister’s commitment to CONDITION and QUALITY. In this regard, we take special pride in offering you spiked helmets whose condition is at least well above average, if not excellent. I examine hundreds of pickelhauben to find the very few that fulfill all four criteria mentioned above. Upon receiving their new treasure, collectors who have purchased one of our pickelhauben often exclaim that their helmet looks even better than the photos we had displayed on our website. [We do use a high-quality digital camera to photograph our items and upgrade cameras every two years, but enough with the Der Rittmeister Militaria commercial]! Just remember, dear friends, Der Rittmeister’s Four Critical Criteria for collecting pickelhauben: ORIGINALITY, AUTHENTICITY, CONDITION, and QUALITY.
The pickelhaube was designed in 1842 by Prussia’s König Frederick William IV for use in the Prussian Infanterie. [The Prussian king might have copied similar helmets adopted by Russia’s military during the same time period. It is not clear whether this was a case of imitation, parallel invention, or if both were based on Napoleonic cuirassiers’ helmets]. The helmet style was soon adopted by Germany’s other states and kingdoms during the mid-19th Century, with Bavaria being the final principality to implement it in 1886. [The Bavarians always seemed to go their own way! Interestingly, Bavaria was also the last to authorize kugelhelme for their Artillerie Regiments in 1913]. In addition to Russia, spiked helmets were adopted by many Latin American countries. They were even worn by the USA’s armed forces from the 1880's until around 1910.
We also remind all pickelhaube enthusiasts about our good friend Jim Turinetti’s excellent reference books on the subject (click here to see DRM’s Imperial German Headdress Page Nr 3), available as spiral-bound paperbacks or on CD. You cannot go wrong with them. I can safely state that Jim is the USA’s foremost authority on pickelhauben. Please support him. Dollar for dollar, these books are the best on the market, and reward you with an immeasurable return in value! [Remember, Jim receives any and ALL the profits from his works, Der Rittmeister Militaria just promotes them to help educate the collecting community].

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

04-752 XKA BAVARIA - PICKELHAUBE - RESERVE OFFICER’S - CHEVAULEGERS OR SCHWERES-REITER-REGIMENT. This is a fine Bavarian Reserve Officer’s pickelhaube from a Chevaulegers or Schweres-Reiter-Regiment. The helmet would have been correct for any of the regiments listed below.

 

 

2. Schweres-Reiter-Regiment
1. Chevaulegers-Regiment Kaiser Nickolaus con Rußland
3. Chevaulegers-Regiment Herzog Karl Theodor
5. Chevaulegers-Regiment Erzherzog von Österreich
7. Chevaulegers-Regiment Prinz Alfons

 

 

 

 

 

Each of these five regiments used gold-toned furniture. As these Chevaulegers-Regiments were all "odd-numbered" regiments, their even-numbered counterparts (Chevaulegers-Regiment Nrs 2, 4, 6, and 8) used silver-toned furniture. The 1. Schweres-Reiter-Regiment also used silver-toned furniture.
The helmet’s leather body is in fine condition, generally. Some small imperfections and shrinkages in the front and rear visors are present. The quite typical settling of the leather where the large cruciform is attached is not as pronounced on the leather body’s top. All in all, it is a lovely leather body. Like all Bavarian officers’ pickelhauben, it has a squared-front visor rather than the Prussian-style rounded front visor (except for Prussian Dragoner-Regiments and General officers’ spiked helmets). All of its furniture, including the wappen, chin scales, cruciform, officer’s stars, trim and tall, fluted spike (capable of being dismounted for the attachment of a trichter and horsehair bush) are made of brass.
The wappen features a pair of rampant Bavarian Lions holding between their paws a shield on which the reserve officer cross appears. While the shield is brass, the oversized cross is silver-toned. Mounted on the cross’s center is a smaller shield displaying the Bavarian state flag’s checkerboard design. The chin scales are convex, differentiating it from an Infanterie spiked helmet. The exterior’s final details are the correct officer’s State’s
and Reich’s kokarden, which both exhibit some chipping to their paint.
The helmet’s interior displays a dark leather sweatband that has seen moderate use. An unusual light-green silk liner (in excellent condition) is attached to the sweatband. All of the correct hardware is present beneath the silk liner. NO double holes are present.
This is a well-preserved Kavallerie officer’s pickelhaube that was produced prior to WW I and remains in fine condition.
$4.995.00    

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

At Der Rittmeister Militaria, we strive to bring you the best in spiked helmets, or pickelhauben (plural for pickelhaube), one of Imperial German Militaria’s most interesting areas for collecting. While ORIGINALITY and AUTHENTICITY are of prime importance, please do not forget Der Rittmeister’s commitment to CONDITION and QUALITY. In this regard, we take special pride in offering you spiked helmets whose condition is at least well above average, if not excellent. I examine hundreds of pickelhauben to find the very few that fulfill all four criteria mentioned above. Upon receiving their new treasure, collectors who have purchased one of our pickelhauben often exclaim that their helmet looks even better than the photos we had displayed on our website. [We do use a high-quality digital camera to photograph our items and upgrade cameras every two years, but enough with the Der Rittmeister Militaria commercial]! Just remember, dear friends, Der Rittmeister’s Four Critical Criteria for collecting pickelhauben: ORIGINALITY, AUTHENTICITY, CONDITION, and QUALITY.
The pickelhaube was designed in 1842 by Prussia’s König Frederick William IV for use in the Prussian Infanterie. [The Prussian king might have copied similar helmets adopted by Russia’s military during the same time period. It is not clear whether this was a case of imitation, parallel invention, or if both were based on Napoleonic cuirassiers’ helmets]. The helmet style was soon adopted by Germany’s other states and kingdoms during the mid-19th Century, with Bavaria being the final principality to implement it in 1886. [The Bavarians always seemed to go their own way! Interestingly, Bavaria was also the last to authorize kugelhelme for their Artillerie Regiments in 1913]. In addition to Russia, spiked helmets were adopted by many Latin American countries. They were even worn by the USA’s armed forces from the 1880's until around 1910.
We also remind all pickelhaube enthusiasts about our good friend Jim Turinetti’s excellent reference books on the subject (click here to see DRM’s Imperial German Headdress Page Nr 3), available as spiral-bound paperbacks or on CD. You cannot go wrong with them. I can safely state that Jim is the USA’s foremost authority on pickelhauben. Please support him. Dollar for dollar, these books are the best on the market, and reward you with an immeasurable return in value! [Remember, Jim receives any and ALL the profits from his works, Der Rittmeister Militaria just promotes them to help educate the collecting community].

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

04-754 PRUSSIA - PICKELHAUBE - RESERVE OFFICER’S - LINE DRAGONER-REGIMENT NRs 7, 8, 11, 13, AND 14 - WITH PARADE BUSH AND SPIKE.. Today we are offering a fine reserve officer’s pickelhaube that would have been suitable for FIVE different Prussian Line Dragoner-Regiments (Nrs 7, 8, 11, 13, and 14). All of them featured gold-toned brass fittings, in contrast to Dragoner-Regiments Nrs 4, 5, 6, 9, 12, and 15, which featured silver-toned fittings. Dragoner Regiments were part of the Prussian Army’s Kavallerie, along with the Husaren, Ulanen, and Küraßiers. The first Prussian Dragoner-Regiment was formed in 1689. Another was formed in 1704. More were formed in the early 19th Century during the Napoleonic Wars. The bulk of the line Kavallerie Regiments were formed around 1860, prior to the 1864 Danish-Prussian, the 1866 Austro-Prussian, and the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian Wars.

 

 


By the time the Franco-Prussian War arrived, it was becoming evident that the cavalry’s future
in modern warfare would be limited. This was partially due to bolt action rifles that permitted more accurate, rapid firing than the old muzzle-loaders, and other advances in artillery. The situation was further heightened by the introduction of machine guns late in the 19th Century, which rendered cavalrymen equally as tasty targets as the infantry. During WW I’s early months, the cavalry’s role was quickly reduced, since charges against entrenched positions became futile. At best, the cavalrymen were used as scouts, or more often dismounted to fight in the trenches alongside the infantry. Their horses were sent home, used to move artillery, or (later) eaten. The era for the cavalry had ended.

 

The helmet’s leather body is high-quality, with an excellent finish and condition. [Please note that Dragoner pickelhauben feature squared front visors in contrast to Infanterie Regiments rounded ones]. Some very minor areas are lightly scarred, but the leather exhibits NO major blemishes. The leather is solid and was well preserved over the one-hundred-plus years since its original owner purchased it. It definitely is a pre WW I-quality pickelhaube that I date to the 1900-1910 period. As mentioned earlier, its furniture is all made of brass with a handsome gold tone, with one small exception. The Iron Cross-shaped reserve cross in the center of the wappen’s eagle is silver-toned. The date "1813" appears in the cross’s center. [I want to point out that locating a reserve officer’s pickelhaube for this type of regiment is quite a "find." Dragoner-Regiment pickelhauben are much scarcer than Infanterie Regiment examples. Prior to WW I, approximately one hundred-eighty Infanterie Regiments were in existence, compared to a mere twenty-five Dragoner-Regiments. Added to that, far fewer reserve officers’ pickelhauben existed than those from the regular army].

 

 

 

 

Also please note that the cruciform base on this helmet differs from the rounded base used on Infanterie Regiment pickelhauben. The helmet’s spike is also EXTRA tall, very much like the spikes favored by the Saxons. This style is quite unusual for a Prussian helmet, which demonstrates its original owner’s sense of style. Also included is a very full parade bush and gilt-toned trichter. Our resident expert on parade bushes, Miss Alore, has curry-combed it so that it looks quite smart. We are quite pleased to include the parade bush AND spike. The correct officers’ State’s and Reich’s kokarden are present.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The interior features a lightly-used, brown leather sweatband. The leather is in very fine condition, as is its attached light-brown silk liner. Although it exhibits a few light spots of perspiration, NO signs of running or shredding are evident. Underneath the silk liner, all of the original hardware is in place. NO double holes appear where the wappen is attached the leather body. A lightly pencilled-in "55" is present on the leather interior. It is an average size for a German from the era. It remains a 100% original and correct pickelhaube that is in excellent condition, complete with both parade bush/trichter and service spike. $6,995.00   

 

At Der Rittmeister Militaria, we strive to bring you the best in spiked helmets, or pickelhauben (plural for pickelhaube), one of Imperial German Militaria’s most interesting areas for collecting. While ORIGINALITY and AUTHENTICITY are of prime importance, please do not forget Der Rittmeister’s commitment to CONDITION and QUALITY. In this regard, we take special pride in offering you spiked helmets whose condition is at least well above average, if not excellent. I examine hundreds of pickelhauben to find the very few that fulfill all four criteria mentioned above. Upon receiving their new treasure, collectors who have purchased one of our pickelhauben often exclaim that their helmet looks even better than the photos we had displayed on our website. [We do use a high-quality digital camera to photograph our items and upgrade cameras every two years, but enough with the Der Rittmeister Militaria commercial]! Just remember, dear friends, Der Rittmeister’s Four Critical Criteria for collecting pickelhauben: ORIGINALITY, AUTHENTICITY, CONDITION, and QUALITY.

 

 

 

 

 

The pickelhaube was designed in 1842 by Prussia’s König Frederick William IV for use in the Prussian Infanterie. [The Prussian king might have copied similar helmets adopted by Russia’s military during the same time period. It is not clear whether this was a case of imitation, parallel invention, or if both were based on Napoleonic cuirassiers’ helmets]. The helmet style was soon adopted by Germany’s other states and kingdoms during the mid-19th Century, with Bavaria being the final principality to implement it in 1886. [The Bavarians always seemed to go their own way! Interestingly, Bavaria was also the last to authorize kugelhelme for their Artillerie Regiments in 1913]. In addition to Russia, spiked helmets were adopted by many Latin American countries. They were even worn by the USA’s armed forces from the 1880's until around 1910.
We also remind all pickelhaube enthusiasts about our good friend Jim Turinetti’s excellent reference books on the subject (click here to see DRM’s Imperial German Headdress Page Nr 3), available as spiral-bound paperbacks or on CD. You cannot go wrong with them. I can safely state that Jim is the USA’s foremost authority on pickelhauben. Please support him. Dollar for dollar, these books are the best on the market, and reward you with an immeasurable return in value! [Remember, Jim receives any and ALL the profits from his works, Der Rittmeister Militaria just promotes them to help educate the collecting community].

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14-452 XKG ORIGINAL PAINTING BY JACK D. HUNTER - "GEBRÜDER VON RICHTHOFEN" - THE FOKKER DR. 1 TRIPLANES OF MANFRED AND LOTHAR VON RICHTHOFEN. We fondly remember Jack D. Hunter, author of The Blue Max and its two sequels: The Blood Order and The Tin Cravat. Jack was a dear friend, as well an inspiration. When I discovered The Blue Max (both the movie and the novel) as a teenager in the 1960's, it sparked a lifelong love of WW I in general and its Air War in particular. I first met Jack in the 1980's, and he remained my dear friend until his death (continuing as my friend today in spirit). In addition to being a talented author, Jack was also a very talented artist. When The Blue Max was first published, it was he who did the dust cover’s artwork! He was told by his publisher that since he was a first-time author, they would not pay for color art on its dust jacket. Jack stepped in and said "I’ll do it!" and he did!
Jack continued to paint mixed media pictures throughout his life as a hobby. He had a keen eye and the ability to bring WW I airplanes to life on canvas. Part of this talent was his attention to detail. He had an extensive aviation library in which he conducted detailed research about the pilots and airplanes he wanted to portray. From that information, he worked up rough pencil drafts of the airplane. He wanted to ensure that details such as the guy wires, turnbuckles, engine cowl, machine gun placement, etc., were correct before he began to paint.
The last painting that Jack did for me was really quite unusual. I wanted something that involved Manfred von Richthofen. He groaned and said "Oh, please, not another red Triplane with Roy Brown chasing him or the Baron chasing Wilfred May (who almost became Der Rote Baron’s 81st victim)!" I said "OK, surprise me." And he did. Years before he did a painting for me that depicted the two von Richthofen brothers flying their red Albatros D. V’s or D. Va’s. It centered on a mission in April 1917 (eventually known as "Bloody April") where their father Albrecht was visiting them at Jasta 11's airfield. Each brother was successful that day (they both happily reported to their father that they had shot down Englishmen).
So I was stunned when Jack presented me with the painting that I am offering today. He titled it "Gebrüder von Richthofen" (The Von Richthofen Brothers), a simple and elegant name for a painting. The subject’s aircraft study was more than I could ever have hoped for. It shows two Fokker Dr. 1 Triplanes in wing-to-wing level flight.

 

[PLEASE NOTE: Manfred von Richthofen flew at least EIGHT different Fokker Triplanes. Many people who have not studied him are unaware of this. They often erroneously believe that the only Fokker Dr. 1 he flew was all red. The machine that he flew on his death day, 21 April 1918, a Fokker Triplane 425/17, WAS primarily red. It was the most vibrantly-painted of the Fokker Triplanes that he had at his disposal. That being said, he did fly several other machines. Below is a list of the various Fokker Dr. 1 Triplanes flown by the Red Baron.

 

Fokker Triplane 152/17 (remember this number)!
Fokker Triplane FI 102/17
(an early prototype)
Fokker Triplane 127/17
Fokker Triplane 114/17
Fokker Triplane 477/17
Fokker Triplane 454/17
Fokker Triplane 425/17
(his death plane)

 

Aside from 425/17, the other seven airplanes featured significant amounts of camouflage splashed with red. [Younger brother Lothar von Richthofen’s machine sported the same camouflage splashed with yellow. Lothar displayed yellow on his plane because prior to joining the Imperial German Air Service he had been a Kavallerie Regiment Dragoner and yellow was an important color to Dragoner-Regiments]. Of the eighty victories that Manfred von Richthofen achieved, the bulk was achieved in aircraft other than the Fokker Dr. 1 Triplane. In fact, only eighteen of his confirmed victories came in the Triplane. The other sixty-two came in a combination of the Albatros D. II., the Halberstadt D. II., and the Albatros D. V. and D. Va. aircrafts. Some sources claim that Fokker Dr. 1 152/17 (the subject of this painting) was used in either two or three of von Richthofen’s victories in March 1918. The Baron’s 79th and 80th victories on 20 April 1918 (the day before he died) were in the Fokker Dr 1 425/17 had. I find it most amusing that the Red Triplane, the source of so much admiration for the Red Baron, only saw the final two victories of his career!
What became of Fokker Triplane Dr. 1 152/17? After von Richthofen’s death, it was sent to Berlin’s Zeughaus Museum. I have read two stories on its fate. One is that it was destroyed in the Allied bombing of Berlin. A second story is that it was moved East to avoid destruction in Berlin and that freezing peasants burned it to stay warm. Both interesting stories, but we will never know for sure.

 

The painting is housed in an ultra high-end custom frame that measures 24½"x 29," and features a handsome burled wood (a personal favorite) sandwiched between two bands of ridged black wood that accent the smooth burled brown wood. As an integral part of the framing, we specified that a triple matting that accentuates the painting’s various colors: two thin mattes of red and blue with a broader mottled-silver matt. It is very striking and extremely elegant! The work was done at a high-end frame shop that uses the best of the best in terms of materials and labor.
The painting itself measures 18" x 13." We see two Fokker Triplanes in level flight, wing to wing. Manfred von Richthofen is in the foreground while his brother, Lothar, is in the back. Their scale and power immediately seize one’s attention. They loom large on the canvas. They are not, however, the blazing red Fokker Dr 1's one might expect. Instead, we see the great areas of camouflage canvas that were consistent with these airplanes’ actual appearance.
Consider Lothar von Richthofen’s Triplane in the background. It displays red cowling, red struts, red undercarriage legs, and the red wheel disks that represented Jasta 11. It sports a yellow fuselage from its Iron Cross area back to the tail, acknowledging Lothar's personal attachment to his former Dragoner-Regiment. While no aircraft number is visible due to the wing placement, the aircraft is most certainly Fokker Triplane Dr 1 454/17.

 

 

 

Let us now turn to Manfred von Richthofen’s aircraft. It also displays the red cowl, red wheels, red struts, red undercarriage legs, and red wheel disks. Where Lothar’s plane was yellow aft of the Iron Cross, Manfred’s is red. Significant portions of camouflage remain, however. [It certainly is NOT the pure red airplane we so often envision when contemplating Manfred von Richthofen]. The aircraft also displays "Fok. Dr. 1 152/17" on its side. If you look at the list of the various Triplanes he flew, you will see that 152/17 is at the top of the list. He actually flew this aircraft more than 425/17! [Here is one small detail about these airplanes. Their Iron Crosses were of an earlier style. The Balkan Cross was introduced after March 1918. The planes depicted, then, were flown in late Autumn 1917 or early Winter 1918. By the time Manfred von Richthofen flew in 425/17, the plane sported an up-to-date Balkan Cross].
This painting captures an amazing moment in WW I aviation history. It has been in a place of honor in our home for many years. Now, it is time to share it with a new owner. [We want to remind you that we also are offering an example of Manfred von Richthofen’s signature, as well as a small piece of AUTHENTICATED fabric from 425/17. If you are interested in a combination of any of these items, we will gladly offer you a handsome discount].
$2,995.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15-697 XAS TUNIC - PRUSSIA - IDENTIFIED - GENERALLEUTNANT VON WISSENDORF. This is a consignment item from the collection of a very experienced, longtime collector who has an appreciation for unusual, seldom-seen items that are in excellent condition. Today we are offering, on his behalf, a parade tunic that belonged to a Prussian Generalleutnant named von Wissendorf. The tunic’s consignor informs us that he was assigned to the Prussian VII. Armeekorps, which was based in Münster.

 

The pre WWI dunkel-blau (dark-blue) tunic dates from approximately 1887 and is made of the finest wool that was available at the time. It obviously came from a skilled tailor’s workshop, since it is quite a masterpiece. A total of twelve unadorned gold-toned buttons runs down the tunic’s center. Its collar design is quite striking, and displays the tremendous gold bullion used in the pattern by the period’s General officers (BEFORE bullion kragenspiegel (collar patches) came into use post-1909 – this design dates from 1856 up to 1909). [I personally think the earlier form was a much more elegant way to display a General officer’s rank]. The gold bullion’s design features oak leaves interspersed with gilt-toned, bullet-shaped acorns against a red background. The acorns’ gilt coating has worn away over the years, so that they now appear to be silver-toned.

 

The tunic exhibits an amazing combination shoulder board/aiguillette on its right shoulder. It is fashioned from rich, gold bullion and features a single Generalleutnant’s silver pip. [The silver pip usually indicated that its owner was an à la Suite officer (an honorary rank), since gold pips were for use by Generals who were tactical commanders rather than à la Suites]. The aiguillette’s color also confirms its wearer was a line-officer, NOT an à la Suite. The aiguillette consists of two one-inch wide, gold bullion braids attached to four one-quarter-inch wide gold-toned bullion ropes. All of these sections are intricately looped together and attached to two more short, one-quarter-inch, gold-toned bullion ropes whose ends are covered by elaborate, sliding, cylindrical, tapered, metal, three-inch-long extensions. Each extension is topped by a Prussian Hohenzollern Crown, which fits into, but is not attached, to the rest of the elegant, tapered cylinder. It is all extremely attractive.

 

 

 

 

 

The tunic’s other shoulder sports a far different type of decoration. It is a five-inch-long intertwined coil of approximately one-quarter-inch, originally silver-toned, metal disks that have tarnished to a dark, gold-toned color. The tunic’s regulations refer to it as "made of two rolled silver wire bullion cords twisted together." [Quite frankly, the device reminds me of something that one might have find on a Christmas tree]! It is attached to the inner point of the shoulder by a gold-toned brass button.

 

 

The tunic’s cuffs display the same design featured on its collar. They are quite large, measuring 3.5" wide. The heavy gold bullion oak leaves are repeated, as are their "acorns." Each cuff also sports two large gold-toned buttons. The tunic’s reverse once again repeats the same bullion oak leaf design on each of the vent’s two halves, along with three large gold-toned buttons. The tunic’s front displays NO loops for sewn-in medal bars, breast stars, or the like. The exterior’s overall condition is very fine, with very little mothing (just the hint of a small moth nip or two). No tears or other major issues are present beyond the expected signs of age.
The tunic’s interior features a very heavy, padded, red silk lining. Some small scattered areas of mothing are present, as well as some of the shredding commonly seen on aging silk. When one considers that it is MORE than one-hundred-twenty years-old, the damage is quite limited. A small pocket appears on the interior’s left side. No indication is given of the original owner’s name, nor of the tailor who designed it.
This tunic is an amazing piece of history that speaks to the elegance of its time. It would make an excellent addition to any uniform collection.
$5,995.00    

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15-700 XRH AUSTRIA - OFFICER - PELISSE AND TROUSERS (HOSE) - HUSAREN-REGIMENT. The attila and pelisse originated from the Austro-Hungarian Empire’s Hungarian cavalry regiments beginning in the 17th Century. The two garments were worn by Hussars. The latter were considered "light" cavalry, more agile and mobile than the "heavy" cavalry who wore armored breast plates (küraßes). The attila was worn as both a daily (interim) tunic, and as a much more elegant dress tunic for parades and official formal occasions. Each tunic displayed horizontal frogging in several places across its front. This frogging was further adorned with two types of buttons. The first was a rosette, a decorative circular button. The second type was a barrel button, which acted as a toggle button that secured the tunic’s two halves.
In addition to the attila, the pelisse initially was used in battle and worn over one shoulder to protect the arm from sword slashes. As time wore on and cavalry charges became less frequent (especially after the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian War) the pelisse transitioned over to the Hussars’ dress ensemble. I suppose one could classify the pelisse as a shell in comparison to the attila, although it actually was a VERY heavy tunic. [I can only imagine how it would have felt to wear one at a parade on a warm summer’s day]! Its weight was due to its thick shearling wool trim.

 

Our offering today is an Imperial Austrian pelisse. Its dark charcoal wool exterior features five double sets of silver bullion frogging and ten decorative silver rosette buttons, as well as the five silver-toned barrel-shaped buttons that were used to secure the garment. When the pelisse was worn off the shoulder, closure buttons were not necessary. If the pelisse was used as a Hussar’s sole tunic, however, buttons were in order. [Please note: the bullion frogging has a greenish tinge to it, probably due to age and oxidation]. It is trimmed with black shearling wool that runs down both sides of the tunic’s front, as well as edging its collar, cuffs, and skirt bottom. The exterior’s left side (from the wearer’s perspective) features a single, thin, silver-bullion shoulder strap that is attached with a small, gold-toned button. Two silver bullion cords extend down from the collar. [I am not familiar with their purpose, since they are not evident on the Imperial German pelisses]. Finally, more ornate silver bullion frogging decorates the sleeves.
The pelisse’s reverse features more silver bullion frogging that extends from the neck and the shoulders down to the skirt’s bottom. Five different lines of frogging decorate the vent area at the reverse’s base, accented by five of the rosette buttons. Two more rosette buttons accent the tunic’s midline at the skirt’s top. Its interior features a brown shearling wool lining that is also quite thick and contributes to the pelisse’s weight. The tunic is in excellent condition, overall.
A pair of dark charcoal wool trousers is included with this ensemble. The trousers button up in front, since zippers were not yet in use. The same silver bullion frogging found on the pelisse appears on the trousers’ front. A single silver bullion rope (rather than frogging) runs down each trouser leg’s outer side. The trousers are in very good condition.

 

 

 

This a fine Austrian Hussar ensemble. [I only wish that I knew more about Austrian Hussar tunics to share with you. If any of our readers can shed additional light on these items, please help us out]! $1,995.00     rcNov17lywy

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

33-346 PRUSSIA - TSCHAKO – OFFICER - MASCHINENGEWEHR-ABTEILUNG. The machine gun was one of the greatest technical innovations leading up to WW I. Once the war began, other new technical developments such as the airplane and the tank were introduced. The machine gun, however, was an extremely proficient instrument of death that mowed down hundreds of thousands (if not millions) of soldiers on ALL sides. Its first iteration was the Maxim Gun, developed around 1883 by a British/American inventor named Hiram Maxim. It was first used in combat by the British in 1893. Maxim Guns were built all over Europe under various licenses. For the purpose of our description today we will briefly discuss the Maschinengewehr 01, 08, 15. [The numbers stand for the year/model in which the Maxim Gun received new developments/improvements. The 08 and 15 were the models used most extensively by the Imperial German Army during WW I].

 

 

 

 

The machine gun’s development prompted the introduction of units specifically trained for its use, called Maschinengewehr-Abteilungen. During WW I, the Germans had approximately 225,000 machine guns liberally sprinkled throughout units on both the Eastern and Western Fronts.
[As early as 1913, however (as "war fever" began to infect much of Europe), the German Army’s size and unit numbers had begun to rapidly escalate. Prior to WW I’s advent, Germany’s largest tactical unit was an Armeekorps (
Prussia, Württemberg, and Saxon accounted for a total of 22 Armeekorps, while Bavaria had another three). When WW I began, two Armees (larger units) were created for Germany’s invasion of France and Belgium. Later on, Armeegruppen were created, which included two or more Armees operating under the Generalfeldmarschall who commanded the Armeegruppe. To translate these into the number of individuals involved, approximately 700,000 men served in the German Army when WW I began. By the war’s end, that number had swelled to 13,500,000]!

 

Seven Prussian and one Saxon Maschinengewehr-Abteilungen were created from 1900 into 1904. (One of Prussia’s seven Maschinengewehr-Abteilungen actually was classified as a GARDE-Maschinengewehr-Abteilung, meaning the other six were considered line units). The Maschinengewehr-Abteilungen’s expansion was massive during WW I (remember the 225,000 figure listed above, although not all of the latter were used by infantry units). Maschinengewehr-Abteilungen were imbedded within most of the infantry and cavalry regiments serving at the Front, with similar units playing a major role in trench warfare on both sides.
Our offering today is an officer’s tschako from one of the six early Maschinengewehr-Abteilungen. The tschako was a very lightweight piece of dress headgear compared to the pickelhaube or kugelhelm. In fact, it may be the lightest of all of Imperial Germany’s dress headgear pieces. Most tschakos’ exteriors are made of black felt. This tschako, however, is colored a handsome blue/green. [One person who looked at it said that it was close to a modern day teal. We will let it suffice that the color is absolutely gorgeous]. Its leather front and rear visors are a handsome brown color, and are connected on both sides by matching brown leather trim. The tschako’s top also is made of brown leather. A single vent hole appears on the left side (from the wearer’s standpoint). Its Prussian wappen and flat chin scales are made of brass. The wappen sports an officer’s open crown. An officer’s Reich’s kokarde adorns the tschako’s right side. No kokarde shows on the left, as is correct. Finally, a Prussian officer’s Feldzeichen (Field Badge) is inserted behind the wappen. The
oval-shaped Feldzeichen has a black velvet center enclosed within row after row of silver bullion.

 

 

Its interior features a light-brown leather sweatband that reveals some evidence of wear with a few small bits of leather missing. The front visor’s underside is brown leather, while the rear visor is covered with green felt. A complete, gorgeous, watermarked, dark-gray silk liner is attached to the leather sweatband, exhibiting NONE of the shredding or running that often occurs over time. [Some small moth nips and moth blooms are scattered across the felt exterior. They are NOT detractive to its overall presentation, in my opinion. We do want to share this with you, however, as the detailed photographs accompanying our description will show. Please remember that we are dealing with more than one-hundred-year-old felt, which tends to age a bit harder than leather. It remains a truly remarkable example compared to the ersatz headdresses in use from 1914 through 1916].
I have long wanted to offer one of these very rare tschakos, but two conditions prevented me from doing so: condition and price. Those that were offered in the past simply did NOT measure up to the standards we require at Der Rittmeister Militaria. The latter was especially true of their felt, which often sported large patches of missing fabric or extremely extensive mothing. If an item is not good enough to be in my collection, then it is not good enough to be in yours! Even with the minor detractions I have described, this tschako’s
condition is by far the BEST that I have ever come across. As regards pricing, these tschakos can be VERY expensive. [Some of the tschakos I rejected were priced at five figures]!
Although our offering remains a substantial investment, it represents a fine value. Sharing this prize with you is a true privilege.
$7,995.00     mkNov17

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15-703 XKA SHOOTING PRIZE - KAISER WILHELM II - MASCHINENGEWEHR-ABTEILUNG - 1913. Kaiser Wilhelm II created shooting prizes for all of the Imperial German Army’s regiments, Bataillone, and Abteilungen to identify the best shooting unit within each section. He even awarded shooting prizes to certain Kaiserliche Marine sailors. These prizes came in the form of sleeve patches that were sewn onto the award-winning soldiers’ tunics and granted on an annual basis. Today we are offering a VERY rare Maschinengewehr-Abteilung shooting prize. [This is the first time I have ever seen one]. The oval-shaped badge measures 2 ¼" x 3 ." Its feldgrau wool background sports a two-piece, brass, oak and laurel leaf wreath topped by a Hohenzollern Crown. The wreath’s two halves are intertwined with ribbon bands tied in a bow at the bottom. The award year, 1913, sits above Kaiser William II’s royal cypher within the wreath’s center. The latter two pieces are also made of brass. [PLEASE NOTE: by 1913, the Imperial German Army was well into the conversion of its uniforms from their previously varied colors to feldgrau, which explains why this badge features a feldgrau background].
The badge’s reverse reveals how its metal portions were sewn onto the cloth. A backing plate is attached, cut in the award’s general. One can easily see how the obverse’s brass decorations are connected to the backing plate. Some minor signs of moth activity appear on the backing material. We can also see pieces of thread from where it was sewn to and removed from its owner’s tunic.
[This exciting badge would make a fine display with the officer’s Maschinengewehr-Abteilung tschako offered above. If you purchase the tschako, please accept this as our gift to you. If the badge is purchased separately, the price is as listed].
$395.00    mkNov17

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

03-119 PATRIOTIC BOX - IMPERIAL GERMAN - WW I. This is a most interesting patriotic box that would have been purchased during WW I and used to store letters or other personal trinkets. The box is covered with feldgrau cotton material, the color of German Army uniforms in both WW I and WW II. It measures 4" x 8 ½" x 12." Some light stains appear on its top. It is trimmed with red leather/leatherette around the top lid’s edges, which has suffered some lifting in places. The motto "Kriegs-Erinnerungen" (War Memories) appears on the front’s the bottom right corner. Its upper left corner displays a small boxed area that measures 2 " x 2 ¾" and contains a multicolored, embroidered Imperial German eagle with a shield superimposed over its chest sporting another black and white eagle. At one point the box had a key to secure its contents, but it is no longer present. Beneath the lid is a generous storage area for whatever treasures you may care to deposit. It is in surprisingly good condition for being one-hundred-years-old. $195.00   

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

04-753 BOOK - REFERENCE - PICKELHAUBEN ( SPIKED HELMETS), THE GLITTERING AGE: GERMAN HEADDRESS FROM THE SEVENTEENTH TO THE TWENTIETH CENTURY 1650-1918 BY DR. ERIC J. JOHANSSON. This is one of the earliest (written in 1982) English-language reference books about German Headdress, covering the period from 1650 through 1918. While its title specifies pickelhauben, the book’s scope extends much further. A good general primer for the student of German Headdress, it includes helmets prior to the Imperial German era. The hardback book presents a short description of each helmet, along with its simple, full-color photograph. In addition to the very early helmets, it covers the Imperial German era pickelhauben, mitres, tschakos, busbies, tschapkas, kugelhelme, and tropenhelme with which we are all familiar.
The book measures 8 ½" x 11" and numbers one-hundred-eighty pages. Obviously, packing such a wide range of helmets into a relatively slender volume does NOT allow for extensive details. That said, it contains some helpful tables that show the rulers of each Kingdom, Grand Duchy, Duchy, and Principality from the 18th Century’s advent through the German Empire’s 1918 demise, as well as information on bandeaux, when pickelhauben were adopted by each state, and so on. Naturally, it includes photos of pickelhaube variations among the states and within different regiments.
The book is in excellent condition. It was the very first book that I bought about Imperial German headdress years ago. I found it quite helpful to grab when I wanted to ID a helmet quickly.
$65.00   

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

09-1029 BOOK - THE IRON TIME BY STEPHEN THOMAS PREVITERA. This book is the ultimate English-language reference about the Iron Cross. Stephen Previtera is a graphic artist by trade who produces reference books that combine beautiful photographs (personally taken by him) with an interesting, scholarly (but NOT dry) writing style. I first met Stephen at a militaria show nearly fifteen years ago (Lieber Gott, where does the time go?). He walked up to my table, introduced himself, and expressed interest in photographing one of my Iron Crosses (a splendid 1870 Iron Cross for Women and Young Women, a.k.a. the Virgin’s Cross) for this very book. I handed him the cross and said, "Return it when you have finished." He seemed a bit surprised but then, as now, I have always wanted to encourage authors who write on the subject of Imperial Germany and Imperial German militaria. He was kind enough to acknowledge me in his first book. We cooperated again for his next book Prussian Blue, about the Orden Pour le Mérite.
As a historian, I am used to wading through dry history books that do not always hold one’s interest, but such is not this author’s problem. His fine sense of history and humor permeates his books, which I appreciate. This book is informative without making you yawn. One of the book’s beauties is his depiction of German history from the Napoleonic era when König Frederick Wilhelm III founded the Iron Cross up through the mid-19th Century unification wars to the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian War, then finally the 20th Century’s two World Wars.

 

As I previously mentioned, another of this book’s real joys comes from the HUNDREDS photos detailing every variation of Iron Cross that was produced from 1813 up to 1945. This book is a true must for any Imperial German reference library. It is the deluxe first edition that comes in a slipcase to protect it on your library shelf. It is dedicated to me. [Yes, I paid FULL price for the book like everybody else, which tells you that I was willing to spend my hard-earned cash to have it in my library]. Have no fear, I still have a copy in my library and will always keep one. Sometimes I just pull it out to read Stephen’s excellent narrative on German history. The book is in excellent condition. $175.00   

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12-824 BOOK - THE MEDALS OF KARL GOETZ BY G. W. KIENAST. This English-language book deals with the table medals created by noted German sculptor Karl X. Goetz (1875-1950). The book is written by G. W. Kienast, THE acknowledged expert on Goetz table medals. During his lifetime, Goetz produced more than eight hundred medals from the Imperial, Weimar, and Third Reich periods. The bulk of his work was done prior to 1933. He was not political and never joined the Nazi Party, although it tried to induce him to do so. Of his eight-hundred-plus works of art, a mere one-hundred-forty were produced during the Third Reich era. Goetz’s pieces were patriotic and sometimes very satirical. One of his most famous and sought-after medals was his breathtaking memorial to Manfred von Richthofen.
This is a first edition by Herr Kienast, of which five hundred were produced. Each was numbered and signed by the author. This particular volume is Number 299. It is a high-quality volume that sports a red leather cover. The book depicts the bulk of Karl Goetz’s artworks, with clear, top-quality photographs throughout. Its text is both interesting and informative. It is a most-difficult book to acquire.
$125.00    cbDec17

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12-825 BOOK - BLUE-EYED CHILD OF FORTUNE: THE CIVIL WAR LETTERS OF COLONEL ROBERT GOULD SHAW EDITED BY RUSSELL DUNCAN. This is American Civil War Colonel Robert Gould Shaw’s (1837-1863) interesting story. Shaw’s life and death were immortalized in the hit 1989 movie Glory, which starred Matthew Broderick as Shaw. Robert Gould Shaw was born to one of the wealthiest families in Massachusetts and grew up in Boston and New York. He traveled extensively abroad and spent two years at Harvard. He and his family were staunch abolitionists. When the Civil War broke out in 1861 he enlisted in a regiment from New York as a private, then later served as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 2nd Massachusetts Infantry. While with that regiment, he participated in battles at Winchester, Cedar Mountain, and Antietam.
Later, when Massachusetts raised the first all-black infantry regiment, the 54th Massachusetts, his father urged him to take its command and Shaw did so. After its training was complete, the regiment was sent to South Carolina. On 18 July 1863 his regiment, along with two brigades of white troops, assaulted the Confederate positions at Battery Wagner. Shaw was mortally wounded at the head of his troops. The attack ultimately failed and Battery Wagner was never captured. The 54th Massachusetts suffered more than 50% casualties. As an insult, the Confederates buried Shaw in a mass grave with his soldiers. His family back North instead considered it an honor that also honored them. Robert Gould Shaw was twenty-five at the time of his death, having been married only two months prior. A very famous monument to Shaw and the men of the 54th Massachusetts later was erected on the Boston Commons.
This book tells his story. What is more important, it features some two-hundred letters written to his mother while he was serving in the army from April 1861 through July 1863. The 421-page hardback was published by the University of Georgia Press in 1992 and has an intact dust jacket. It is very interesting.
$25.00 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13-1046 BOOK - PRINZ HEINRICH VON PREUßEN: ADMIRAL UND FLIEGER. This is German-language book deals with Prinz Heinrich (1862-1929) of Prussia, Kaiser Wilhelm II’s younger brother. In addition to his family, Prinz Heinrich had three abiding passions during his lifetime. The first of these was the Kaiserliche Marine, in which he ultimately served as a Großadmiral. In fact, Heinrich was the only front-line admiral to hold that rank in the Imperial Navy. He eventually assumed command of the naval station at Kiel, then fought the Russians and the British during WW I. His second passion was aviation, for which he sponsored competitions. He also loved automobiles, finally working with Daimler Benz after WW I.
The book, a first edition, was published in 1983 and numbers more than 121 pages. It retains its original dust jacket, and is in very fine condition.
$50.00   rhDec17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13-1047 BOOK - MEMOIRS: TEN YEARS AND TWENTY DAYS - GRAND ADMIRAL KARL DOENITZ. This is an English translation of Grand Admiral Karl Dönitz’s memoirs. He was the architect of the Kriegsmarine’s U-Boot Service during WW II. He also became Germany’s second Führer after Adolf Hitler killed himself in 1945. Dönitz received a lengthy prison sentence after the war. This book tells his story, detailing how the U-Boot Service was built and groomed, and explaining its "Wolfpack" tactics. The soft-cover book spans 500+ pages. It has limited illustrations. $20.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16-486 BOOK - GERMAN KNIGHTS OF THE AIR 1914-1918: THE HOLDERS OF THE ORDEN POUR LE MÉRITE BY TERRY C. TREADWELL AND ALAN C. WOOD. This is an English-language hardback book that features the WW I German aviators who were awarded the Pour le Mérite. It contains a section on every PLM-winning pilot with a description of his career and accomplishments in the Imperial German Air Service. It is liberally illustrated. The book was released in 1998 and comes complete with its dust jacket. It measures 1" x 7½" x 10" and is 208 pages in length. This fine book is in MINT condition. $20.00    rhDec17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16-487 BOOK - HUNTING WITH RICHTHOFEN (JAGD IN FLANDERNS HIMMEL), THE BODENSCHATZ DIARIES: SIXTEEN MONTHS OF BATTLE WITH JAGDGESCHWADER FREIHERR VON RICHTHOFEN NO. 1 - TRANSLATED BY JAN HAYZLETT. This is Jan Hayzlett’s translation from German to English of Karl Bodenschatz’s (1890-1979) famous memoirs. Bodenschatz was JG 1's first the squadron adjutant. [Ms. Hayzlett is a well-known researcher who has specialized in Manfred von Richthofen for more than twenty years. I have known Jan for years and consider her a true student of history. I daresay not many Americans know more about von Richthofen than she does].
JG 1
was the first Geschwader (Flying Wing) created from four Jastas (Nrs 4, 6, 10, and 11), then given to Manfred von Richthofen to command on 24 June 1917. JG 1 became known as the famous "Flying Circus." With very little notice, the Geschwader was quickly transported to any point where it was needed most
on the front. Bodenschatz joined the Geschwader after previously in serving Jasta 2. [In fact, he had reported for duty on 28 October 1916, the very day Jasta 2 Commander Oswald Boelcke was killed in a collision with one of his own pilots]. Once JG 1 was formed, von Richthofen (who had served with him in Jasta 2) had Bodenschatz transferred to his staff. They served together until von Richthofen’s death on 21 April 1918.
As the Geschwader’s adjutant, Bodenschatz was the second-in-command. He handled all matters on the ground that dealt with the Air Service and Armee staffs. Bodenschatz remained in the military after WW ended. When the Luftwaffe was formed just prior to WW II, Bodenschatz joined the new German air force under his old boss Hermann Göring, JG 1's final commander from July to November 1918. He rose to the rank of General der Flieger and was present at the 20 July 1944 attempted assassination of Adolf Hitler, at which he was critically wounded. He survived and later testified at the Nurnberg War Crimes Trials, where he was sentenced to two years in prison.
The liberally-illustrated book relates JG 1's history under three different commanders from its inception up to its dissolution at WW I’s end. It comes complete with its dust jacket and is in excellent condition. It gives us a fascinating look at a man who was intimately involved in JG 1's daily operations and worked side-by-side with Manfred von Richthofen.
$35.00   jbDec17

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16-488 BOOK - BLOODY APRIL . . . BLACK SEPTEMBER BY NORMAN FRANKS, RUSSELL GUEST, AND FRANK BAILEY. This engaging book was written by three of the most talented and respected researchers/ authors of WW I’s air war. Bloody April (1917) began with the French and British squadrons being totally outclassed by the Imperial German forces. Manfred von Richthofen had assumed command of Jasta 11 in early January 1917, shortly after he was awarded the coveted Orden Pour le Mérite. By that April the Germans ruled the skies with superior aircraft (the Albatros D. III) and better-trained pilots, inflicting horrendous casualties on the British and French. The latter’s pilots in many cases were half or poorly-trained and thrown into combat. As quick as these poor souls were sent to the front, they were shot down and replaced by even greener pilots. During the month of April, the British lost approximately 275 airplanes and a total of 400 aircrew members. Jasta 11 alone accounted for 69 of the planes shot down. In September 1918, with the war less than two months from its end, the Allies’ results were even worse! Although outnumbered by the British, French, and American planes, the Imperial German Air Service and Marine Jastas were fully equipped with Fokker D. VII’s that wreaked havoc among their opponents.
This book details the daily activities of both the Germans and the Allies in depth, and reports what happened in each Jasta or Squadron. It comes complete with its dust jacket and features numerous photographs.
$50.00     jbDec17

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16-489 BOOK - THE BATTLE OF EASTLEIGH, ENGLAND. This is a most interesting look at WW I’s U.S. Naval Air Force. [Very few people even realize that the U.S. Navy fielded aviators during WW I]! The Naval Air Station at Eastleigh was a training and operational bombing base for missions over France. The book studies in detail the officers who were part of the WW I-era naval air force. It was written in 1918, then published immediately after the war in 1919.
The 144-page book measures 8 ½" x 10 ½," and contains many photographs of both the aviators and facilities at Eastleigh. It covers all aspects of the Navy’s efforts, both in the air and with its support services on the ground, and provides a captivating look at WW I’s U.S. naval aviators. Although it lacks a dust jacket, for a nearly one-hundred-year-old book, it is in very good condition. Its
exterior reveals some scuffing and wear around its edges, while its interior rates a "very good plus" score. [I have seen much scruffier copies of this book being offered for $150. Our Der Rittmeister Militaria price is much more reasonable]!
$100.00   

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16-490 BOOK - THE GREAT WAR IN THE AIR: MILITARY AVIATION FROM 1909-1921 BY JOHN H. MORROW, JR. This absorbing book was published in 1993. John Morrow presents a fine historical viewpoint of military aviation from 1909 to 1921. In 1909, six years after the Wright Brothers’ historical flight at Kitty Hawk, European and United States officials began to consider whether or not fixed wing aircraft might be useful during military operations. When WW I arrived, aircraft’s first role was to scout enemy positions. As the war progressed, opposing pilots began to shoot at one another with pistols, rifles, and shotguns. Soon, an enterprising French pilot decided to armor his airplane’s propeller and shoot a machine gun through it. [That did NOT work well! The enterprising French airman shot himself down].
The great Tony Fokker further developed the Frenchman’s idea, inventing an interrupter gear that allowed German aircraft to fire only when the propeller was NOT in the line of fire. This fantastic modification soon had airplanes falling from the skies at record levels. More innovations quickly followed. Larger airplanes became bombers, dropping increasingly massive bomb loads on assorted targets. At the same time, the German Army and Navy were sending zeppelins on bombing missions over England and the Continent. And all the while, everyone’s planes kept getting faster and more deadly.
The book gives a fine overview of the operations and advancing of military planes during WW I. While it includes some photographs, the author focuses one’s attention on the book’s text. The book is a first edition, is over 450 pages long, and comes complete with its dust jacket. Dr. Morrow is one of the most respected authors on WW I aviation and teaches at the University of Georgia where he has been the Franklin Professor and the Chairman of the History Department. This is serious reading!
$65.00   

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16-491 BOOK - ABOVE AND BEYOND: THE AVIATION MEDALS OF HONOR BY BARRETT TILMANN. The Medal of Honor, once known as the Congressional Medal of Honor, is the highest award that the United States can confer on a soldier, sailor (from the U.S. Navy or the U.S. Coast Guard), marine, or airman. Like Great Britain’s Victoria Cross, it is awarded to personnel of ALL ranks, not just officers (as was Prussia’s Pour le Mérite). The Medal of Honor was first awarded during the U.S. Civil War. Since its inception, it has been awarded 3,515 times (621 times posthumously).
This book was first published in 2002, and covers aviation Medal of Honor winners from WW I, WW II, Korea, and Viet Nam. The U.S. Army, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy all have had famous aviation winners. The book features all of them and includes many interesting photos of the pilots and their planes. The more than 290-page book comes with its dust jacket. Its condition is just like new!
$30.00   

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16-492 BOOK - A HISTORY OF FLIGHT: VOLUME THREE BY COURTLAND CANBY. This is the third volume of this book series. Volume Three starts out with early attempts at aviation, from ancient attempts at winged flight on through the early balloons of 18th Century France. It then goes on to detail the history of modern aviation, but does NOT deal with WW I to any great extent. It focuses instead on civil aviation before and after WW I on up to just before its 1963 copyright date. The book is a first edition that comes complete with its dust jacket. It is in excellent condition. $20.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16-493 BOOK - THE DAY THE RED BARON DIED: FINAL PROOF THAT GROUND FIRE BROUGHT VON RICHTHOFEN DOWN - BY DALE M. TITLER. This is an English-language, first edition hardback that was published in the 1970's. It was the earliest work that dealt with the now-accepted view that Manfred von Richthofen was brought down by Australian machine gunners’ ground fire rather than the previously-accepted view that the RFC’s Captain Roy Brown shot down "Der Rote Kampflieger." The more than 300-page book, which comes with its original dust jacket, is profusely illustrated. It features some interesting and helpful indexes, which include official British documents after von Richthofen’s death, a map of his final flight, and a full list of his eighty confirmed victories that list dates, types of aircraft, squadrons, names of personnel, etc. It is in excellent condition. $20.00     jbDec17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16-494 BOOK - THE AIRCRAFT OF THE ROYAL AIR FORCE - ISSUED BY JOHN PLAYER & SONS CIGARETTE COMPANY. John Player & Sons Cigarettes is a famous British tobacco and cigarette manufacturer that was founded in 1820. It merged with the Imperial Tobacco Group in 1901, but continued to produce cigarettes under its original name. Its cigarettes are still produced today by the United Kingdom’s Imperial Brands. This small book was issued under the John Player & Sons name and sold in the U.K. for one penny. It features the R.A.F.’s aircraft from the mid-20th Century. Like Imperial Germany’s similar cigarette albums, the small (only 5" x 7 ¼") book features 47 cigarette cards and descriptions of the R.A.F.’s various airplanes. The planes include fighter planes, bombers, transports, seaplanes, and such from the 1930's and 1940's. Each full-color cigarette card measures 1 ½" x 2 ½." It is an informative and interesting handbook that details basic facts about the R.A.F.’s many aircraft from the period. The book is in excellent condition, with all the cards present. $25.00   

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16-495 BOOK - R.A.F. BADGES - ISSUED BY JOHN PLAYER & SONS CIGARETTE COMPANY. John Player & Sons Cigarettes is a famous British tobacco and cigarette manufacturer that was founded in 1820. It merged with the Imperial Tobacco Group in 1901, but continued to produce cigarettes under its original name. Its cigarettes are still produced today by the United Kingdom’s Imperial Brands. This small book was issued under the John Player & Sons name and sold in the U.K. for one penny. It features the R.A.F.’s badges. Like Imperial Germany’s similar cigarette albums, the small (only 5" x 7 ¼") book features 51 cigarette cards and descriptions of the R.A.F.’s various squadron badges. Dating from the 1930's and 1940's, the badges come from various squadrons within the R.A.F.
Each full-color cigarette card measures 1 ½" x 2 ½." The handbook is informative and interesting, providing a good, basic overview of the period’s many R.A.F. squadron badges. The book is in excellent condition, with all the cards present.
$25.00   

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16-496 MAGAZINE - OVER THE FRONT: VOLUME 13, NUMBER 4 - LEAGUE OF WORLD WAR 1 AVIATION HISTORIANS. The League of World War 1 Aviation Historians is the premiere group that researches and shares information about the Great War’s aviation. [I have been a member of this fine organization on and off over the years]. Its members range from serious researchers and authors to the average individual who is curious about aviation as it unfolded during WW I. The League publishes a high-quality, very professional magazine for the enjoyment of its members on a quarterly basis. Various members research and present articles and photographs about different WW I aviators, aircraft, and related topics from both the Allies’ and the Central Powers’ perspectives.
Today we are offering the 1998 Winter Quarter issue. It contains several interesting articles, including one about the American Ace/Balloon Buster/Medal of Honor winner Frank Luke. It is in excellent condition. If you have an interest in WW I aviation, I urge you to join the League. They do good work preserving the memory of WW I aviators and their aircraft.
$10.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16-497 MAGAZINE - OVER THE FRONT: VOLUME 15, NUMBER 2 - LEAGUE OF WORLD WAR 1 AVIATION HISTORIANS. The League of World War 1 Aviation Historians is the premiere group that researches and shares information about the Great War’s aviation. [I have been a member of this fine organization on and off over the years]. Its members range from serious researchers and authors to the average individual who is curious about aviation as it unfolded during WW I. The League publishes a high-quality, very professional magazine for the enjoyment of its members on a quarterly basis. Various members research and present articles and photographs about different WW I aviators, aircraft, and related topics from both the Allies’ and the Central Powers’ perspectives.
Today we are offering the 2000 Summer Quarter issue. It contains several interesting articles about the Bavarian Fliegertruppen and its pilots. It is in excellent condition. If you have an interest in WW I aviation, I urge you to join the League. They do good work preserving the memory of WW I aviators and their aircraft.
$10.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16-498 MAGAZINE - OVER THE FRONT: VOLUME 13, NUMBER 2 - LEAGUE OF WORLD WAR 1 AVIATION HISTORIANS. The League of World War 1 Aviation Historians is the premiere group that researches and shares information about the Great War’s aviation. [I have been a member of this fine organization on and off over the years]. Its members range from serious researchers and authors to the average individual who is curious about aviation as it unfolded during WW I. The League publishes a high-quality, very professional magazine for the enjoyment of its members on a quarterly basis. Various members research and present articles and photographs about different WW I aviators, aircraft, and related topics from both the Allies’ and the Central Powers’ perspectives.
Today we are offering the 1998 Summer Quarter issue. It contains several interesting articles about German and American aviators, the latter including training in Texas and flying on the Texas Gulf Coast. The issue is in excellent condition. If you have an interest in WW I aviation, I urge you to join the League. They do good work preserving the memory of WW I aviators and their aircraft.
$10.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16-499 MAGAZINE - OVER THE FRONT: VOLUME 13, NUMBER 1 - LEAGUE OF WORLD WAR 1 AVIATION HISTORIANS. The League of World War 1 Aviation Historians is the premiere group that researches and shares information about the Great War’s aviation. [I have been a member of this fine organization on and off over the years]. Its members range from serious researchers and authors to the average individual who is curious about aviation as it unfolded during WW I. The League publishes a high-quality, very professional magazine for the enjoyment of its members on a quarterly basis. Various members research and present articles and photographs about different WW I aviators, aircraft, and related topics from both the Allies’ and the Central Powers’ perspectives.
Today we are offering the 1998 Spring Quarter issue. It contains several interesting articles, including one about aviation in Palestine, another focusing on Italian aviation, and one regarding a Russian naval aviator. The issue is in excellent condition. If you have an interest in WW I aviation, I urge you to join the League. They do good work preserving the memory of WW I aviators and their aircraft.
$10.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16-500 MAGAZINE - OVER THE FRONT: VOLUME 6, NUMBER 4 - LEAGUE OF WORLD WAR 1 AVIATION HISTORIANS. The League of World War 1 Aviation Historians is the premiere group which researches and shares information of aviation during the Great War. I have been a member of this fine organization on and off over the years. The members range from serious researchers and authors to the average individual who is interested in the aviation as it unfolded during WW I. The League publishes on a Quarterly basis a high quality and very professional magazine for the enjoyment of their members. Various members research and offer articles and photographs on different aviators, topics, and aircraft of WW I on both the Allied and Central power side.
Today we are offering the 1991 Winter Quarter issue. It contains several interesting articles about the 91st Aero Squadron, translations of some of Erwin Böhme’s letters about flying over Flanders, and another about a Texas aerial gunner school for bombardiers. The issue is in excellent condition. If you have an interest in WW I aviation, I urge you to join the League. They do good work preserving the memory of WW I aviators and their aircraft.
$10.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

34-94 PATRIOTIC TABLE/DRESSER SCARF - WESTERN FRONT MAP - 1914. This is a most unusual item. I would describe it as a table or dresser scarf that measures 22" x 25 ½," and takes the form of a multicolored map depicting the Western Front, including Belgium, France, and Western Germany. The legend listed below appears in the map’s lower left corner.

 

 

Karte (Map)
vom (of)
Deutsch-Französischen (German-French)
Kriegschauplatz (Theater of War)
1914

 

The map is made of thin, gauzy cotton, similar to what was used on many of the period’s military and patriotic flags. The flag features a wide red border on its edge, followed by smaller, red, black and white (Germany’s national colors) half-inch-wide borders surrounding the black and white map in its center. Numerous oak leaves (symbolizing German strength) are laid diagonally across these national color bands.
The highly-detailed central map concentrates on the northern part of France, with most of Belgium, as well as the strip of Western Germany that shared its eastern border with France. City names are prominently displayed, as well as depictions of more hilly terrain.
The scarf is in very fine condition, overall. With some creativity on the part of its new owner, it would make a fine addition to a WW I display.
$95.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

33-334 XRP PRUSSIAN - BUSBY - OFFICER - HUSAREN-REGIMENT NR 12 - FULL PARADE CONFIGURATION INCLUDING PARADE FEATHERS. This is a consignment item. It is a Thüringisches Husaren-Regiment Nr 12 officer’s busby (pelzmütze) in full-parade-configuration with its very rare parade feathers. The regiment was founded in 1781, and garrisoned in Torgau from 1901 until WWI’s end. It was attached to the IV. Armeekorps. It was an old-line Prussian regiment that participated in conflicts spanning from the Napoleonic Wars to the German unification wars of the 1860's through the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian War up to WW I, when it fought as dismounted cavalry in the trenches on both the Western and Eastern Fronts. It had been among the leading German units in WW I ‘s early days, when it still functioned as mounted cavalry. It was directly involved in the invasion of Belgium.
Officers’ busbies are among the most elegant and beautiful Imperial German headdresses. The busby’s exterior is lined with very soft, plush otter fur. Near the top, facing the observer, is the very handsome silver-frosted wappen in the form of a bandeau that proclaims "Mitt Gott Für König und Vaterland" (With God for King and Fatherland). The pelzmütze had evolved from Hungarian cavalry regiments, as had the attila, the unique tunic worn by Husaren-Regiment troops. Slipped in behind the wappen is the officer’s feldzeichen (field badge), constructed of silver bullion with a black velvet center that denoted the Kingdom of Prussia. The convex gold chin scales are mounted in the "up" position behind the feldzeichen. A single officer’s Reich’s kokarde appears on the busby’s right side. A white kolpak covers the busby’s top (it is removable) and hangs down over its left side. The kolpak’s color and the silver-toned wappen enable us to identify it as an officer’s busby from Thüringisches Husaren-Regiment Nr 12. The busby’s cap lines (essentially a rope-like silver bullion arrangement) hang down from the back. They were primarily for decoration, although the cap lines could be loosened and attached to the wearer’s attila to prevent the busby from flying off his head while his horse was at a gallop.
The exterior’s final detail is its very rare parade feathers. The combination of black and white heron feathers is attached to the busby by a metal clip inserted behind the feldzeichen.

 

 

The busby’s interior is every bit as impressive as its exterior. It boasts a very handsome brown leather sweatband that shows little evidence of wear or staining. The liner is typical for that found in officer-style busbies. It actually consists of two pieces of light-beige silk fabric. The first section lines the roof of the interior, while a lower section of gathered fabric extends up several inches from behind the sweatband to a cutout center that allows the wearer’s head to poke through.
I am very impressed with this busby’s originality and condition. In all honesty, it is as fine an example as I have ever seen. The officer who originally purchased this knew (and demanded) superior quality. He also had the means to afford it. No detail or cost was spared in the busby’s construction. This is a complete busby in full-parade-configuration, including the marvelous cap lines and very rare officer’s parade plume. It dates from 1900 to 1910, meaning it is over one-hundred years-old. Whoever purchases it will be getting the best of the best. It will never need to be upgraded.
$11,995.00PRICE REDUCED:$10,195.00!

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

09-1001 XLL PRINZENGROßE 1870 IRON CROSS 2ND CLASS WITH ORIGINAL PRESENTATION CASE. This is a consignment item and an absolute first-time offering for Der Rittmeister Militaria. The term "Prinzengroße" means prince-sized, and refers to medals that run from two-thirds to three-quarters the size of an original decoration (most often an Iron Cross or Pilot Badge). They came about from the desires of 18th and 19th Century noble and aristocratic fathers to outfit their young sons in exact replicas of their own military uniforms, complete with matching headgear, weapons and medals. Since these uniforms had to be tailored down to fit the youths’ smaller proportions, the accouterments had to follow suit. Eventually, the smaller decorations came to be favored by some of the adults, particularly from the Napoleonic era forward. By the time WW I arrived, Prinzengroße Iron Crosses had become quite a popular affectation among certain officers of noble and royal lineage.
Today we are offering an incredibly rare Prinzengroße 1870 Iron Cross 2nd Class with its original presentation case. The Iron Cross measures 1 ½" x 1 ½." Attached to the cross is the loop where the ribbon was placed when the medal was displayed on a tunic. While the Iron Cross itself is noteworthy, the presentation case is what makes it so rare. This is the FIRST time I have seen an Iron Cross 2nd Class’s case! I had seen the case for the 1st Class award occasionally, but NEVER before beheld one for the 2nd Class – until now. The leatherette case measures ¾" x 3" x 3." A gold trim design graces the exterior cover’s edges. Although its top has a blackish cast, the leatherette is a dark burgundy in color. Its interior reveals a burgundy silk-covered upper lid, while its bottom half is covered with dark burgundy velvet. The bottom half is fitted to hold the Iron Cross and its jump ring. Some scrapes and minor damage affect the upper half’s silk. The Iron Cross itself is in very fine condition. The paint on the obverse and reverse is excellent.
The entire presentation is superb. It would make a fine addition to any Iron Cross collection. $1,995.00 FINAL REDUCTION:$1,550.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

09-1002 XLL VAULTED .800 SILVER HALLMARKED 1914 IRON CROSS 1st CLASS WITH GLASS-COVERED PRESENTATION CASE. This is a consignment item. It is a very high quality 1914 Iron Cross 1st Class that is housed in one of the most unusual presentation cases I have ever seen. It is a privately-purchased example. It is vaulted, which (in my opinion) always makes for a special Iron Cross. The paint on the obverse shows some toning on the arms. I rate the paint at 95%. The frame has a fine patina on the silver, as evidenced by its mirrored finish on the reverse. Its magnetic center was made of iron before it was painted.
Its reverse reveals a flat pin. It is also hallmarked for .800 silver near the catch. The reverse’s mirrored finish features black writing that appears to read either "7G/9 10Z" or "20/6/02." It looks as though this was written in black ink of some sort, but rubbing my fingers across it does NOT make it disappear. I leave it to its new owner to decide whether to leave or remove it.
The most interesting thing about the item is its presentation case. It measures 1" x 2 ¾" x 2 ¾." The upper lid is made of glass, which allows for the viewing of the cross WITH the case closed. The case’s exterior is made of red leatherette. Its fitted bottom is a dark red/maroon in color. The closure button operates easily.

 

 

 

Another surprise on the case is an easel that folds away into the case’s bottom, then opens up, allowing the case to be displayed. It provides an arresting display of a fine Iron Cross 1st Class. $695.00 FINAL PRICE REDUCTION: $500.00

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

09-1003 XLL CLOTH 1939 IRON CROSS 1ST CLASS. This is a consignment item. It is a WW II 1939 Iron Cross 1st Class made of cloth, an historic tie-in to the very rare fabric 1914 Iron Cross 1st Class. In both cases, the crosses were intended to be sewn to the receiver’s left tunic breast. [The decision to use fabric instead of metal was made by the individual officer]. WW I’s and WW II’s German Armies granted some flexibility that allowed the officer to do this.
This example measures 2" x 2." The badge’s background is made of black wool. Embroidered to it is a silver bullion cross with a swastika in its center. The year 1939 appears at the bottom. A different type of fabric backing is on the reverse. It is a very handsome alternative to the 1939 Iron Cross 1st Class, and a most desirable addition to any Iron Cross collection. $495.00
FINAL PRICE REDUCTION: $375.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23-447 XLL NAVAL SEE-BATAILLON LEUTNANT’S SHOULDER BOARDS. This is a consignment item. The See-Bataillon was Imperial Germany’s version of the USA’s Marine Corps. Its members filled a number of roles: serving aboard large naval vessels, providing security at German embassies in foreign countries, etc. (e.g., the entire See-Bataillon Nr III was based in China to oversee Germany’s colonial interests). These shoulder boards are of the sewn-in variety and measure 1" x 4." Each displays a large Hohenzollern Crown on its obverse. Half-black/half-red-and-white chevrons are interwoven into the boards’ silver bullion, indicating the See-Bataillon’s status as a national entity (rather than coming from a particular state or kingdom). The reverse sports a white fabric backing.
The shoulder boards are in excellent condition. $1,050.00
FINAL  PRICE REDUCTION: $575.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22-106 XBS FOR VALOUR: THE HISTORY OF THE IRON CROSS AND WOUND BADGE IN GERMAN SOUTHWEST AFRICA 1914-1918 by GORDON McGREGOR. This is a consignment item. It covers the awarding of the 1914 Iron Cross and the German Wound Badge in Southwest Africa during World War One. The soft cover book was published in 2005. It contains examples of an Iron Cross’s Urkunde (Award Document), including the numerous formats used. It also lists the numbers and types of Iron Crosses awarded (i.e., 1st and 2nd Class and a breakdown of 2nd Class Combatants and Non Combatants), as well as the soldiers who were awarded the 2nd Class.
It is a useful research book, and can help confirm which Colonial Southwest African soldiers were awarded the Iron Cross.
$95.00 HOLIDAY-ONLY REDUCED PRICE: $90.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

31-128 XBS AWARD DOCUMENT GROUP FOR GERMAN SOUTHWEST AFRICA SCHUTZTRUPPEN MEMBER. This is a consignment item. The document group covers a German Southwest Africa (DSW) Schutztruppen member named Hugo Kleemann. His documents are chronologically listed below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1). Document for the Award of the 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class. The document measures 6 ¾" x 10." At this point Kleemann was an Unteroffizier. It is dated 15 May 1919, after he had been returned to Germany. The document’s left section depicts a standing enlisted man/NCO holding the German national flag (NOT the kriegsflagge) beneath a 1914 Iron Cross. The man is wearing the Schutztruppen’s well-known hut (hat) with its half-turned-up brim. The document is stamped in blue ink with the Schutztruppen unit’s identification "Kommando der Schutztruppen im Reichskolonialministerium" (Imperial Colonial Office Protection Forces Command) accompanying a scrawled official’s signature. The document clearly states that on this date Kleemann had received his Iron Cross 2nd Class.

 

2). Ausweiß (Identity Transcript). The document’s obverse is dated 16 May 1919. It was issued in Friedrichshafen on the same date, and measures 8" x 10 ¼." It bears the unit stamp for the "Reichs-Kolonial amt Kommando der Schutztruppen" (an abbreviated form of Imperial Colonial Office Protection Forces Command). It also features a hastily scrawled Major’s signature. The document’s reverse states that Kleemann was honorably separated from the Schutztruppen effective 30 January 1919.

 

3). Fifteen-Years Loyal Service Award Document. It is a first class award that bears the Schutztruppen’s unit stamp. It was signed by the same officer who signed Kleemann’s 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class Award Document. The Service award’s date is 31 October 1919. It measures 6 ¼" x 7."

 

 

4). Kolonialabzeichen Urkunde (Colonial Badge Award Document). The award’s date was 22 March 1922. The document measures 7 ¼" x 8 ½." Two of the sides display African motifs such as a native shield, spears and swords. A lion’s head decorates the document’s top. The phrase "Afrika, Kiautschou, and Südsee" is displayed at the document’s bottom enclosed within a wreath. The document was signed with the purple grease pencil often used by officers in the field.

 

5). Hindenburg Cross for Combatants Award Document. This was awarded through the Hamburg police department (we later discover that Kleemann was a Hamburg policeman). The basic form date given for the preprinted document is 13 July 1934. It was signed and issued on 19 December 1934 by a police official. It measures 5 ¾" x 8 ¼."

 

6). Police Department Long-Service Award Document. This is a very fancy velum document attesting to twenty-five years of long service to the police department. The document is signed in Berlin with a deeply embossed eagle and swastika. It is dated 26 September 1938, and is signed at the bottom with a reproduction signature for "Der Führer and Reichskanzler Adolf Hitler." The document measures 8 ¼" x 11 ½," and is four pages long, only one of which was used. It is a very impressive document that was presented in the name of the German people.

 

This most interesting document group celebrates a man’s service during and after WW I. You may wish to purchase both the group and the book on Iron Cross awards in German Southwest Africa, which would make a fine companion for the documents. $995.00   HOLIDAY-ONLY PRICE REDUCTION!!$775.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21-325 XBS LUFTSCHIFFER OFFICER’S DOCUMENT AND PHOTO GROUP. This is a consignment item. If you have an interest in document groups, we have something special for you. If you have an interest in observation balloons and zeppelins, this wonderful group is VERY special for you. The number of documents it contains is absolutely staggering, and will enable you to track and research almost everything the man ever did. His name was Werner Eugen Möschke. He was born in 1881, then first entered the army at the dawn of the 20th Century. The document group indicates he saw early service in Nassau Field Artillery-Regiment Nr 27. After completing his mandatory two years of military service, Möschke began his post high school (called "gymnasium" in Germany) studies, eventually becoming a mechanical engineer. The group contains many documents from this period, including some confirming his graduation and his qualifications as an engineer.
When WW I broke out, Möschke found himself in a Luftschiffer-Bataillon as a Leutnant der Reserve. Luftschiffer-Bataillons included the observation balloons that were launched from mobile units to spy on enemy positions and call in artillery strikes, which was his assignment. Later he was transferred to the Luftschiffer-Bataillon’s zeppelin section. He finished the war as a Hauptmann der Reserve. Our document group provides definite proof that he did indeed serve with a zeppelin unit, although I am unable to determine if he was onboard as a zeppelin commander or if he was a unit commander. [Please note: in 1917, the Imperial German Army decided it was no longer interested in fielding Luftschiffer-Bataillons. So, the Army turned over all its airships and zeppelin-related equipment to the Kaiserliche Marine, including (perhaps) some transfer of personnel].
Möschke returned to his peacetime profession when WW I was over. In the 1930's, however, he returned to the army, where he eventually achieved a major’s rank. The group’s consignor has included several typed papers containing translated information concerning some of the documents, including his war service. These papers indicate that he served as a member of the executive committee for a military reporting office in Freiburg during WW II. Photos from the group show him wearing the very rare Army Commemorative Airship Badge, which further documents his involvement with zeppelins as well as an observation squadron.
We are listing some of the group’s military-related documents below. Some of them detail his various assignments during the Great War.

 

Above all, they show some of the more important and costly battles in which Möschke was involved.

 

 

1) 1907 Artillerie Officer’s Patent. The same type of patent was used whether its recipient was a Leutnant or a Generalmajor. The only real difference is that junior officer’s Patents were not signed by Kaiser Wilhelm II. Prior to WW I, the Kaiser had personally signed Patents in the rank of Hauptmann and above. Due to the Imperial German Army’s size, however, as the war progressed, he signed far fewer Patents, perhaps only for Majors and above.

 

 

 

 

 

2) Award Document for the Long-Service Award 2nd Class. Dated March 1914, it was issued through the XVIII Armeekorps.

 

 

 

3) Award Document for the Iron Cross 2nd Class. It is dated August 1917.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4) Award Document for the Ernst Ludwig Allgemeines Ehrenzeichen für Tapferkeit. He was awarded Hesse’s Iron Cross 2nd Class equivalent in 1915. The very ornate document bears the Grand Duke of Hesse’s signature. Möschke probably was a native son of Hesse to have received its award so much earlier than the Imperial Iron Cross 2nd Class he later was awarded.

 

 

 

 

 

 

5) Enlisted Man/NCO’s Militärpaß and Soldbuch. This dates from his two-year mandatory service.

 

 

6) Two Kriegsranglisten. These documents were used by officers, much as an enlisted man and NCO used a Militärpaß. Each contained all of their owner’s critical information about his rank, promotions, areas of service with dates, awards, and so on. They are excellent sources for research. They indicate that he saw service in the battles of Verdun and Ypres. One of the two was updated in 1935 when he once more re-entered the army.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7) Hindenburg Cross with Swords for Combatants Award Document. The document is dated 1935.

 

 

A number of military-related documents date from 1935 forward. Following WW II, Möschke went through the de-Nazification process where he was deemed not to be a hard-core Nazi threat. He again returned to engineering, although the papers indicate he had health problems that stemmed from his many high-altitude flights. He died at the age of 73.
We have barely scratched the surface of what is contained in this fantastic document group. We have never offered anything as extensive as this group! Möschke took great pains to retain the many documents that related to his military and professional life. Stacked up, the group measures some two-to-three inches in height! Frankly, the group is mind-boggling.
You will have hours of fun pouring though all of these documents and learning more about a man who served his country through two world wars. Please be ready for the large number of photographs attached to our entry. In this case, a picture IS worth a thousand words! $2,495.00 HOLIDAY-ONLY PRICE REDUCTION!!
  $1,995.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

02-427 XBS SEVEN-PLACE NAVY-STYLE FRACK BAR. This is a consignment item. It is a Frack Bar that was used by the Navy, Diplomatic Service, and etc. a Frack Bar’s primary characteristic is that it is constructed on an angle. Also, the 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class, which typically appears all the way to the left on most medal bars, appears on the right instead. The rather large and extensive Frack Bar sports SEVEN decorations, and measures 7 ½." It features the decorations listed below from left to right.

 

1). Hannover Landeskriegerverband. It was a Hannover veteran’s organization for men who served from 1914 to 1918. This identification appears on the reverse of a bronze-toned decoration that measures 1 ½" in diameter. Its obverse features the Hannover and Braunschweig running horse in profile, along with the date 1914-1918.

2). Hindenburg Cross with Swords for Combatants. This decoration was awarded in three grades: combatants, non combatants, and to the families of soldiers who died in action or from wounds received while in action. This one for combatants features swords through a cross’s center with the dates 1914-1918. It was initiated after Reichspräsident Generalfeldmarschall Paul von Hindenburg’s death. He was Germany’s most famous Great War military hero.

3). Kriegsehrenkreuz für Heldenmütige Tat 2nd Klasse (War Honor Cross for Heroic Deed[s]). This gold-toned cross was the Principality of Lippe-Detmold’s 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class equivalent.

4). Fürstlich Lippischer Hausorden Ehrenkreuz 4.Klasse (The Princely House Order of Lippe Honor Cross 4th Class). This decoration was from the Principality of Lippe-Detmold. It is a pre war award and does NOT come with the crossed swords that were awarded to officers who had been in combat. Even though it is the 4th Class, it is a very high level award. It displays a wonderful enamel red rose in its center that was emblematic of Lippe-Detmold.

5). Kriegsverdienstkreuz II. Klasse (War Service Cross 2nd Class). This is the Duchy of Braunschweig’s 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class equivalent. While it is smaller in size (measuring 1 ¼" x 1 ¼"), it is NOT a Prinzengroße-sized award. It was only awarded in this size. Its obverse sports Herzog Ernst August’s cypher. He was Braunschweig’s final ruler, who was married to Kaiser Wilhelm II’s only daughter.

6). Verdienstkreuz für Kriegshilfe. This was a civil award that was awarded from 1916 through 1924 for aid given during the war.

7). 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class - Prussia.

 

All of the decorations and ribbons are in mint condition. This is an exciting Frack Bar with many interesting decorations. $1,395.00  HOLIDAY-ONLY REDUCED PRICE: $1,250.00rhDec17

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

02-428 XBS FIVE-PLACE RIBBON BAR. This is a consignment item. It is a five-place ribbon bar that measures 3 ¼." It contains the decorations listed below in order from left to right.

 

 

1) 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class - Prussia.

2) This decoration is unidentified.

3). Saxe-Ernestine House Order 4th Class - Saxe-Coburg und Gotha.

4) Friedrich August Cross 2nd Class - Oldenburg.

5). Knight’s Cross of the Franz Josef Order.

It is an attractive piece. $95.00  HOLIDAY-ONLY REDUCED PRICE: $85.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

05-1691 XBS MILITARY MERIT CROSS 4th CLASS - BAVARIA. This is a consignment item. It is the Military Merit Cross 4th Cross from the Kingdom of Bavaria, an officer-level award that was given in a number of variations (i.e., 1st through 4th award levels, pinbacks, etc.). The 4th Class award was the most basic. It was given not only to native sons, but to allied officers of Bavaria who fought side by side with Bavarian troops. It was first awarded in 1866 after that same year’s Austro-Prussian War. It was authorized by King (Mad) Ludwig II (1845-1886) of Bavaria. [Ludwig led a tortured life. He nearly bankrupted Bavaria with his lavish lifestyle and the building of numerous castles all over Bavaria. Ultimately, he was removed from his throne in 1886 for "mental defect," then was found mysteriously drowned the following day. His brother Otto was also found mentally incompetent. This led to the appointment of a Regent, Prinz Regent Luitpold, who served in that role from 1886 through 1912. Upon his death, he was succeeded by Prinz Ludwig. The latter served as Regent until 1913, when he assumed the throne as King Ludwig III. He was Bavaria’s King until 1918, when all the heads of state relinquished their thrones at WW I’s end.
The 4th Class award was given in both combatants’ and non combatants’ versions. The cross, which measures 1 ¾" x 1 ¾," has handsome blue arms. Its center features black, gold and white enamel, with a brilliant crowned gold "L" cypher in place. Above that is the Latin word Merenti.
The decoration’s reverse features a rampant Bavarian Lion and the date 1866 (when the decoration was introduced) beneath a pair of crossed swords at the top. The sword’s reverse is hallmarked for .800 silver. The cross’s overall condition is excellent. The enamel shows no chipping whatsoever. This example is in top condition.
$650.00  HOLIDAY-ONLY REDUCED PRICE: $585.00

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

04-729 XAS BAVARIA - GENERAL OFFICER'S - PICKELHAUBE. This is a consignment item. Our offering today is an extremely fine General Officer’s pickelhaube from the Kingdom of Bavaria. It is Bavaria’s final General Officer’s pickelhaube pattern, which was introduced in 1913 then used through WW I’s end. It sports an excellent leather body that has remained in fine shape due to its owners’ careful maintenance since it was first accepted at its purveyor’s establishment. The general who purchased it both knew AND demanded superior quality, as is evident from its smooth, almost blemish-free surface. Babies’ bottoms do not come much cleaner or smoother than this! Some depression/settling shows where the cruciform attaches at the helmet’s crown, which is very common with Bavarian pickelhauben. [Interestingly enough, I do NOT see this as often with other Imperial German states’ headgear].
Its front visor is squared-off instead of rounded. All of its furniture is silver-toned, including the chin scales, cruciform, officers’ stars, and its (magnificently tall and fluted) spike. Its wappen displays a gorgeous silver patina that confirms it has not been cleaned in decades. The oval, multicolored (black, red, gold, blue, and white) enamel shield in the wappen’s center is what makes this general’s helmet "pop" when you look at it. The shield features two rampant Bavarian Lions (whose silver-toned likenesses comprise the rest of the wappen on either side of the shield), above and below a smaller blue and white Bavarian checkerboard in its center. [The same blue and white checkerboard design also dominates Bavaria’s state flag]. The helmet’s exterior also features the correct Bavarian and Reich’s kokarden.

 

 

The pickelhaube’s interior reveals a fine brown-leather sweatband. A pinkish-colored liner is attached to the sweatband. It may be made from polished cotton rather than the more commonly seen silk. It is in mint condition. No extra holes appear under the sweatband. All of the original hardware is in place.
This is a marvelous example of a 1913-pattern Bavarian General Officer’s pickelhaube. You would be hard-pressed to find a finer example. It is being offered UNDER its current market value because its consignor has had it for more than fifteen years. He is allowing me to pass the savings onto you!
$12,995.00PRICE REDUCED:
$9,995.00
rhDec17

 

 

At Der Rittmeister Militaria, we strive to bring you the best in spiked helmets, or pickelhauben (plural for pickelhaube), one of Imperial German Militaria’s most interesting areas for collecting. While ORIGINALITY and AUTHENTICITY are of prime importance, please do not forget Der Rittmeister’s commitment to CONDITION and QUALITY. In this regard, we take special pride in offering you spiked helmets whose condition is at least well above average, if not excellent. I examine hundreds of pickelhauben to find the very few that fulfill all four criteria mentioned above. Upon receiving their new treasure, collectors who have purchased one of our pickelhauben often exclaim that their helmet looks even better than the photos we had displayed on our website. [We do use a high-quality digital camera to photograph our items and upgrade cameras every two years, but enough with the Der Rittmeister Militaria commercial]! Just remember, dear friends, Der Rittmeister’s Four Critical Criteria for collecting pickelhauben: ORIGINALITY, AUTHENTICITY, CONDITION, and QUALITY.
The pickelhaube was designed in 1842 by Prussia’s König Frederick William IV for use in the Prussian Infanterie. [The Prussian king might have copied similar helmets adopted by Russia’s military during the same time period. It is not clear whether this was a case of imitation, parallel invention, or if both were based on Napoleonic cuirassiers’ helmets]. The helmet style was soon adopted by Germany’s other states and kingdoms during the mid-19th Century, with Bavaria being the final principality to implement it in 1886. [The Bavarians always seemed to go their own way! Interestingly, Bavaria was also the last to authorize kugelhelme for their Artillerie Regiments in 1913]. In addition to Russia, spiked helmets were adopted by many Latin American countries. They were even worn by the USA’s armed forces from the 1880's until around 1910.

 

We also remind all pickelhaube enthusiasts about our good friend Jim Turinetti’s excellent reference books on the subject (click here to see DRM’s Imperial German Headdress Page Nr 3), available as spiral-bound paperbacks or on CD. You cannot go wrong with them. I can safely state that Jim is the USA’s foremost authority on pickelhauben. Please support him. Dollar for dollar, these books are the best on the market, and reward you with an immeasurable return in value! [Remember, Jim receives any and ALL the profits from his works, Der Rittmeister Militaria just promotes them to help educate the collecting community].  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

04-743 PRUSSIAN - PICKELHAUBE - NCO - GARDE-GRENADIER-REGIMENT OR GARDE-REGIMENT ZU FUß - PRIVATELY-PURCHASED NOT DEPOT-ISSUED. This is a high-quality, privately-purchased NCO’S pickelhaube from either a Garde-Grenadier or Garde zu Fuß-Regiment, which include the regiments listed below.

 

2. Garde-Regiment zu Fuß
Kaiser Alexander Grade-Grenadier-Regiment Nr 1
Kaiser Franz Garde-Grenadier-Regiment Nr 2
Königin Elisabeth Garde-Grenadier-Regiment Nr 3
Königin Augusta Garde-Grenadier-Regiment 4
Garde-Grenadier-Regiment Nr 5

 

 

As you can see, these are very elite regiments. Officers’ examples for these regiments can be quite expensive (we currently have one lovely example available for purchase). As a rule, I do not offer enlisted men/NCO’s pickelhauben unless they come from smaller states. I am quite pleased, however, to share this fine helmet with you.
The helmet’s leather body is exceptional, or even beyond that. It is smooth and amazingly clean and clear, not marred by damage due to age or other circumstances. Its condition far exceeds what we often see on officers’ helmets. The rear visor shows signs of shrinkage, which is common in a one-hundred-plus year-old helmet’s leather body.

 

The helmet’s furniture presents a lovely Garde wappen. Its brass eagle features ultra-wide, outspread wings. They are so wide, in fact, that each wingtip extends to the respective Reich’s and state’s kokarden center points. A silver Garde Star provides a fine contrast against the brass eagle’s chest. The remaining furniture is also brass, including the flat chin scales (remember, Infanterie pickelhauben should have flat rather than convex chin scales), the cruciform, the detachable spike, as well as the front and back visors’ trim. The obverse’s final details are the correct NCO’s state’s and Reich’s kokarden.
The helmet’s interior is every bit as clean inside as it is outside. The enlisted/NCO style leather liner is magnificent. Every tongue is in place and an extra-long sizing thong is present. Under the leather liner, ALL of the original hardware is present, with NO double holes. No depot marks show on the rear visor, confirming its status as a privately-purchased helmet rather than an army depot issue. This NCO had a lot of pride in his regiment. He took excellent care of his gear, as evidenced by this helmet’s condition.
The helmet is in amazing condition. If you want something a bit different for your collection, this will fill the bill. It would also make a fine companion piece to an officer’s helmet. [If you have an interest in the helmet, and our equally well conditioned officer’s example on offer, we can offer you a very attractive price on the pair].
$2,995.00   

 

 

At Der Rittmeister Militaria, we strive to bring you the best in spiked helmets, or pickelhauben (plural for pickelhaube), one of Imperial German Militaria’s most interesting areas for collecting. While ORIGINALITY and AUTHENTICITY are of prime importance, please do not forget Der Rittmeister’s commitment to CONDITION and QUALITY. In this regard, we take special pride in offering you spiked helmets whose condition is at least well above average, if not excellent. I examine hundreds of pickelhauben to find the very few that fulfill all four criteria mentioned above. Upon receiving their new treasure, collectors who have purchased one of our pickelhauben often exclaim that their helmet looks even better than the photos we had displayed on our website. [We do use a high-quality digital camera to photograph our items and upgrade cameras every two years, but enough with the Der Rittmeister Militaria commercial]! Just remember, dear friends, Der Rittmeister’s Four Critical Criteria for collecting pickelhauben: ORIGINALITY, AUTHENTICITY, CONDITION, and QUALITY.
The pickelhaube was designed in 1842 by Prussia’s König Frederick William IV for use in the Prussian Infanterie. [The Prussian king might have copied similar helmets adopted by Russia’s military during the same time period. It is not clear whether this was a case of imitation, parallel invention, or if both were based on Napoleonic cuirassiers’ helmets]. The helmet style was soon adopted by Germany’s other states and kingdoms during the mid-19th Century, with Bavaria being the final principality to implement it in 1886. [The Bavarians always seemed to go their own way! Interestingly, Bavaria was also the last to authorize kugelhelme for their Artillerie Regiments in 1913]. In addition to Russia, spiked helmets were adopted by many Latin American countries. They were even worn by the USA’s armed forces from the 1880's until around 1910.
We also remind all pickelhaube enthusiasts about our good friend Jim Turinetti’s excellent reference books on the subject (click here to see DRM’s Imperial German Headdress Page Nr 3), available as spiral-bound paperbacks or on CD. You cannot go wrong with them. I can safely state that Jim is the USA’s foremost authority on pickelhauben. Please support him. Dollar for dollar, these books are the best on the market, and reward you with an immeasurable return in value! [Remember, Jim receives any and ALL the profits from his works, Der Rittmeister Militaria just promotes them to help educate the collecting community].

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20-173 KAISER WILHELM II'S PERSONAL NAVY SEE-BATAILLON GENERALFELDMARSCHALL'S TSCHAKO IN FULL PARADE CONFIGURATION - COMPLETE WITH PARADE FEATHERS AND TWO STORAGE BOXES. Today we are offering perhaps the single most important artifact ever in the history of Der Rittmeister Militaria. In our day we have offered many fine articles of headdress, tunics, etc. from Germany’s royals. We even have offered several Schirmmützen that once belonged to Kaiser Wilhelm II, but never anything quite like this! Today we are pleased and honored to present his Majesty Kaiser Wilhelm II’s original officer’s tschako for the See-Bataillon.
As you are well aware, the See-Bataillon was attached to the Kaiserliche Marine, much as the U.S. Marine Corps is to the U. S. Navy and the British Royal Marines are to Her Majesty’s Royal Navy. The See-Bataillon provided shipboard security for the German Imperial Navy’s larger vessels. They were also charged with providing security at many German embassies and consulates around the world. In China one entire Bataillon (Bataillon Nr 3) was assigned as the embassy’s security force, and as additional military muscle to bolster the area’s other colonial troops. Our premiere offering today is the complete ensemble for the Kaiser’s See-Bataillon tschako.
The tschako’s body consists of superb felt for the body portion, and fine leather for its top, as well as the front and rear visors. The See-Bataillon's wappen is absolutely magnificent. It features an eagle with outspread wings. In the middle of its chest is a smaller Hohenzollern Eagle. Clasped in the larger eagle’s talons is an anchor base. Over its head sits a Hohenzollern Crown, with a royal stole streaming out from either side. The wappen is exquisitely frosted. All of its fire gilding remains intact. The tschako boasts a glorious pair of chin scales. The final exterior detail is its field badge, handsomely crafted of silver bullion. It sports a red center signifying the Reich. The exterior’s condition is excellent. I believe most would agree with me. It is in mint-minus condition.
The back interior visor is green leather. The sweatband is ultra soft doeskin. It exhibits an extra band of stitching that one only sees on top-of-the-line headdress. (Naturally, one expects this from the Kaiser!) Its liner is made from superior quality silk. It has a much tighter weave than that one normally sees. Again, this was an expensive helmet option, but if you were the Kaiser, expenses be damned! Wilhelm II’s gold Cypher is embossed on the silk liner. The entire interior is in excellent condition, with just a hint of gentle wear. In all likelihood, it was worn very rarely during Wilhelm II’s reign (1888 to 1918).
Some manufacturer’s production markings seem to appear under the liner, as well as the size, "55 1/4." This is around the average hat/helmet size for the period.
Now let us turn to the helmet’s feather bush. The cock feathers are white, red, and black, representing Germany’s national colors. It differs from a Prussian general’s feathers, which are just black and white. This is because the See-Bataillon was considered a national force rather than merely a Prussian unit. (The same held true for the Kaiserliche Marine). The very full cock feathers are attached to a special trichter, which slides in behind the field badge. The entire tschako takes on an entirely different look when the parade feathers are attached. Accompanying the parade feathers is an officer’s regular horsehair bush. It is a very full and beautifully-shaped. Should you to want to attach the bush, you will need to dismount the feathers. This is because only one of these very special trichters is included. Personally, I cannot imagine why one would wish to do so. The bush comes with the ensemble, however. It will be yours to do with as you wish when you purchase it. Another part of the ensemble is the tschako’s and parade feathers’ storage boxes. The tschako’s box measures 9" x 11" x 8." The box front displays a special-added label that reads "SeeBataillon." Immediately above the unit designation appears Wilhelm II’s similarly Hohenzollern-Crowned Cypher. The box is lined in white silk. The tschako rests inside the box, along with the field badge and the extra, horsehair parade bush. Originally, a leather strap secured the top to the box. Only a remnant of the leather strap remains.
The last piece of the presentation is a special, cylindrically-shaped case, which houses the parade feathers when they are not in use. I have seen similar cases in the past, housing generals’ trichters and feathers. Such cases always are far larger and more ornate than boxes holding lower officers’ horsehair trichters. This one has openings on both ends to facilitate removing and replacing the bush. The ends are appropriately marked "Oben (top)" and "Unten (bottom)." The box stands 11 3/4" high. It is 6 3/4" in diameter at the base. Its side displays a similar label to that seen on the tschako’s box, identifying it as Kaiser Wilhelm II’s property.
Again, we are extremely excited to share this with you. One often hears the term "museum piece" or "museum grade." This certainly applies here. Any collector fortunate enough to have this in his collection (as I do now), is the caretaker of a truly historic piece. I know many of you will flinch at its price. It is expensive, of that we have no doubt. In comparison, two or three years ago I was offered one of Wilhelm II’s feldgrau tunics and an army general pickelhaube. The price to me would have been €50,000. At today’s prices that would equal $74,000+! [Please allow sufficient time for the attached photographs to load. I believe you will find the wait well worth it]! $42,495.00 wbNov17
 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10-882 BINOCULARS. This is a pair of smaller than usual binoculars. They are marked "Carl Zeiss - Jena" on the left side, along with "DF 8X" (the lens power) and the serial number, "433914." A small size such as this was most likely used by an army officer. It has no case, but the leather strap to carry them around one’s neck is in place. The leather wrapping on the exterior is complete and intact. The optics are clear and the binoculars are useable. $75.00 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12-814 PATRIOTIC HORSESHOE FRAME - 1917. The horseshoe has long served as a symbol of luck and strength to the German people. Even today, a small horseshoe can be seen on German automobiles. This oversized, horseshoe-shaped frame measures 6 ½" x 7 ½," and served as a patriotic demonstration of solidarity and strength during WW I. At the shoe’s bottom is an area engraved with a patriotic statement of support and the date, 1917. No photograph is enclosed within the frame, so you will have the opportunity to one of your choice. The area for the photograph measures 4 ½" x 4 ½."
A fixed easel appears on the reverse that allows the frame to be displayed on a flat surface. [It is a heavy and substantial frame. Additional shipping will be required].
$125.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12-817 BOOK - STEEL POTS - BY CHRIS ARMOLD. This fascinating book chronicles the USA’s military’s use of steel helmets, which began with WW I. At that time, the USA adopted Great Britain’s primary helmet, continuing its use into WW II’s early days, when a new version was introduced. While the previous sentence sums up the essential history of "steel pots," the author goes far beyond mere basics by covering the years between the two World Wars and details some of the U.S. Army’s experimental helmets from the period. The latter spearheaded the relatively quick transition from the 1917's helmet to the style used during WW II, Korea, and Viet Nam. The author discusses the helmet currently used by all US Armed Forces, which are now made of Kevlar™ to provide greater protection from bullets and shrapnel (the same material used for police and military forces’ body armor). Kevlar helmets also are far lighter and cooler to wear. [If you look at the USA’s current helmet, you will note that it is very similar to Germany’s WW I and WW II stahlhelme. American troops often refer to their helmets as "Fritz."]
The book has 270+ photographs (both color and black and white, as well as sketches and graphs detailing the helmets’ evolution). While not Imperial German, it is comprehensive and makes for good reading.

 

[Let me include a word about its author, Chris Armold. Chris is a retired senior U.S. Air Force NCO who spent more than three years researching and writing his book. I first met Chris in 1996, the year we founded DRM. He became a good friend and advisor during our fledgling company’s early years. Chris even designed our first logo featuring Rittmeister Manfred von Richthofen flanked by his famous Fokker Dr 1 Triplane. We are still using that basic logo to this day (with some minor modifications made three years ago). He is a great guy to whom we always wish the best.
It is a first-edition that includes a 1997 dedication
(the year the book was released) from Chris to me. Comparables on Amazon reveal that first editions like it can fetch around $130. Our example is in MINT condition and constitutes a real value!
$95.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12-818 BOOK - PAINTED STEEL: STEEL POTS VOLUME II - BY CHRIS ARMOLD. This fascinating book chronicles the USA’s military’s use of steel helmets, which began with WW I. At that time, the USA adopted Great Britain’s primary helmet, continuing its use into WW II’s early days, when a new version was introduced. This volume features various examples of these helmets that have been painted and personalized. This practice began during WW I, featuring information (numbers or emblems) from the division in which its wearer served. It also includes examples of helmets that were very artistically painted after the war. This practice continued into WW II and beyond, spreading from steel infantry helmets to include Air Force pilots’ helmets, as well as other types. The practice has continued to the present day.
The book features 250+ (both color and black and white, as well as sketches and graphs detailing the helmets’ evolution). While not Imperial German, it is comprehensive and makes for good reading.

 

 

[Let me include a word about its author, Chris Armold. Chris is a retired senior U.S. Air Force NCO who spent more than three years researching and writing his first volume. Volume two was released three years later, in 2000. I first met Chris in 1996, the year we founded DRM. He became a good friend and advisor during our fledgling company’s early years. Chris even designed our first logo featuring Rittmeister Manfred von Richthofen flanked by his famous Fokker Dr 1 Triplane. We are still using that basic logo to this day (with some minor modifications made three years ago). He is a great guy to whom we always wish the best. Chris was kind enough to recognize Melissa and me in this volume (although I know very little about U.S. helmets[!]). He also was kind enough to sign a dedication to us. $40.00  jbNov17 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13-1040 SLEEVE PATCH - FLIEGER FLUGMAAT - KAISERLICHE MARINE. This is an amazingly rare sleeve patch for an enlisted man/NCO (Flugmaat) attached to a naval aviation unit. It was worn on a dress tunic’s sleeve. It is oval-shaped and measures 3 ½" x 4 ¼." It features a brass anchor against a navy-blue wool background. A red enameled propeller that measures 2 ½" in length sits across the anchor’s width. The patch’s reverse displays a canvas backing.
The patch dates to 1915 and is VERY rare. I have never seen another, much less had the opportunity to acquire it. Aviation material is hard to find these days, while material from the Kaiserliche Marine’s aviation units is nearly impossible to find, with the exception of an occasional Navy Flight Badge. This is the first such badge that we have encountered. We are quite pleased to share it with you. It would make for a fine addition to any aviation collection.
$695.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15-701 XRH BAVARIA - TUNIC - ENLISTED MAN’S - DEPOT-ISSUED - INFANTERIE-REGIMENT NR 10. This is a consignment item. It is a tunic from the Kingdom of Bavaria’s 10. Infanterie-Regiment König Ludwig. The regiment was founded in 1682. Along with the 2. Infanterie-Regiment Kronprinz, it was one of the oldest Bavarian Infanterie Regiments. It was garrisoned at Ingolstadt and attached to the Bavarian III. Armeekorps. The tunic is a pre war dunkel-blau (dark-blue) example, made of wool. It sports eight large silver-toned buttons edged with red piping down its center. The vent flap on the uniform’s reverse repeats the red piping and another six (three per each side of the flap) silver-toned buttons. The tunic’s collar displays red and white kragenspiegel. Its red shoulder straps are embroidered with König Ludwig’s crowned "L" royal cypher, as is correct for the regiment. The straps are held in place by small silver-toned buttons that indicate the wearer was assigned to Kompagnie Nr 6. Both of the uniform’s red cuffs display three white litzen, each of which sports a silver-toned button. The interior features an excellent white cotton lining. Two different black depot marks have been stamped onto the liner.

 

 

 

 

This very hard-to-find, depot-issued tunic is in excellent condition. It may have only been issued once, as it does NOT feature extensive depot marks that cover a long period, (which also may be why the tunic is in such marvelous condition)! $1,195.00    

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18-495 SILVER CUP SHOOTING PRIZE. This is a fine silvered cup that was presented as a shooting prize to an officer in 1912. The cup was presented to a Major and I. Bataillon commander for an unnamed regiment. [I am sure that a little bit of time spent with a period Rangliste would help identify in which regiment he served. A further peek at a WW I Rangliste from 1914 to 1918 would reveal whether or not the man survived and to what rank he might have risen. I would venture that with the army’s expansion, he might have well become a regimental commander or higher, depending on his service and whether or not he survived the entire war.   The engraving on the cup appears as is listed below.

Offiziers Preisschießen 1912
I. Bataillon
Ehrenpreis Gegee. Von
Major D´Alleux

 

The cup displays a wonderful patina. It stands 6 ½" tall. It is wider at the top than the bottom, getting larger the higher it goes. The diameter at the rim is 4." The diameter at the base is 2 ½." The base features a handsome design with two rope-like trim bands, one toward its top and the other at its base. The cup weighs 6 ounces. NO silver or jeweler hallmarks are present. [A sharp-eyed reader of ours was studying his Imperial Rangliste and found the following: "Oberstlt D'Alleux of the 5. Infanterie=Regiment Großherzog Ernst Ludwig von Hessen (Bamberg). Off to the right of his name it also reflects him as (K. d. 16. R. I. Br.) and then GM a. D."  This means D'Alleux retired as a General Major a.D. Thanks, KR]!  $250.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18-496 OVERSIZED COBALT-BLUE GLASS BOTTLE LABELED "KAISER PUNSCH." Bright cobalt-blue colored glass bottles were popular in Germany during the Imperial Period and are still found today, particularly for fine wines. Today, we are offering just such a fine, large, Imperial German Era cobalt bottle. How large, you ask? It holds 40 ounces (1,250 ml/1.25 liters), standing an impressive 10 ½" tall and measuring 11" in circumference. A four-by-four inch, multicolored paper label is pasted on its front, bearing Kaiser Wilhelm II’s likeness surrounded by a wreath of grapes and grape leaves. A Hohenzollern Crown sits above his head, while "Kaiser Punsch" appears below.
The bottle is in perfect condition with no cracks or chips. The paper label is complete and in fine condition, although it does show some signs of what I call "honest age." It is definitely NOT a newer interpretation.
$195.00   agNov17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20-250 CAP BADGE - KAISERLICHER YACHT CLUB AND TWO SMALL CHIN STRAP BUTTONS. This is a cap badge worn by Kaiserlicher Yacht Club members on their visor caps. Kaiser Wilhelm II was the club’s head, and participated in many club activities. The oval-shaped, embroidered bullion badge measures 1 ½ x 2." It is a much higher-quality badge than the example that we currently have on our site. The gold bullion is crisp and displays a lovely patina. The black eagle is a different type and appears on a very high-quality, multicolored, enamel shield.
Based on this cap badge’s quality, and that of the one or two we have offered in the past, it was NOT from an ordinary member’s cap. The owner was a man of taste, very likely a member of German royalty or, at the very least, the upper nobility.
Two small black buttons that measure ½" in diameter are included. They would have attached the chin strap to the cap’s front. Each button features a fouled anchor. They make a lovely addition to the cap badge. Together, they will provide a fine addition to any maritime collection. 
$595.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21-336 ZEPPELIN TABLE MEDAL - DEUTSCHE FLOTTEN - 1914/1915. This is a high-quality, early WW I table medal that was issued for the "Deutsche Flotten," all of the Kaiserliche Marine’s various arms, including all naval vessels (surface and U-Boots), fixed-wing airplanes, and zeppelins. Its obverse features examples of all of the naval pieces, the zeppelin in the sky being the most prominent. The table medal’s bottom half features dedication listed below.

 

"Deutsche Flotten                     (The German Fleet is
 Deutsches Schwert                     the German Sword
 Beschützen Unseren                     Protecting Our
       Heimatherd                                   Homeland’s Hearth
      1914/15"
                                               1914/15)

 

 

The table medal’s reverse displays a high-relief likeness of Ferdinand Graf von Zeppelin, the creator of the zeppelins used for commercial service prior to the war. He is wearing a military uniform (he was a Württemberg General). The motto "Excellenz Graf Ferdinand von Zeppelin" surrounds his image. Von Zeppelin, along with Hugo Eckener produced the wartime zeppelins used by both the Imperial Army and Navy (as well as the prewar, civilian zeppelin). After von Zeppelin’s 1917 death, Eckener continued the company. After WW I’s end, they produced the "Graf Zeppelin" and the ill-fated "Hindenburg," both of which provided around-the-world luxury air transport. 
The medal measures 33mm (1 ¼") in diameter. Its silver content, .800 silber, is noted on the edge. The table medal’s date is significant, since silver for items like this was no longer available by 1916. [Even the great Manfred von Richthofen was unable to purchase his prized silver victory cups after his 60th victory]. This table medal is in prime condition.
$295.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21-337 ZEPPELIN PHOTOGRAPH - PERIOD FRAMED AND MATTED - ZEPPELIN RAID ON LONDON. This is a most interesting, period framed and matted photograph from about 1916. It shows a zeppelin in the sky being illuminated by searchlights and antiaircraft shells. The captioned image shows the English population’s courage and defiance throughout the zeppelin attacks. The item measures 7 ½" x 10 ¾," overall. The piece is extremely high-quality and reasonably priced. $95.00  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23-507 XMN PRUSSIA - EPAULETTES - OBERST - INFANTERIE-REGIMENT NR 160. This is a consignment item. We are always delighted to share consignment items with you. This one is rather interesting, not only for what it is, but from where we received it: far-off Thailand! It is a fine pair of Oberst’s epaulettes from the 9. Rheinisches Infanterie-Regiment Nr 160's regimental commander. The regiment, founded in 1897, was unique in that it was garrisoned in three different cities: Bonn, Diez, and Euskirchen. It was attached to the VIII. Armeekorps.
The epaulettes feature brass crescents that sport VERY heavy patinas. They have not been cleaned in decades and have a lovely, toasty look. Their new owner could restore a brighter appearance if so desired, but they show real character as they are now. Light-blue felt bases appear within the metal crescents’ confines, decorated with an Oberst’s twin gilt pips and "160," the regiment’s number. As is correct for a Major/Oberstleutnant/Oberst’s epaulettes, a heavy cascade of braided silver bullion dangles down from the metal crescent. The "tongues" that extend from the
epaulettes’ centers feature silver bullion tape with black trim lines that confirm they are for a Prussian officer.
Each epaulette sports a red felt underlay on its reverse, as well as a few moth nips or two. A contrasting band of silver/gray bullion dangles beneath the ones that are clearly visible on the exterior. While these came to us via Thailand, their veteran owner acquired them in New Zealand back in 1990. These epaulettes have truly traveled around the world!
$595.00  

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

UNDER ARMS FOR THE KAISER:
Shoulder Insignia of the Imperial German Army's Regiments 1871-1918
by Michael A. Kelso.

Our very good friend Michael (Mike) Kelso recently published a superb book covering the Imperial German Army’s epaulettes and shoulder boards from 1871 through 1918 under its three emperors: Kaiser Wilhelm I, Kaiser Friedrich III, and Kaiser Wilhelm II. This particular area of our hobby has long been neglected. To my knowledge, NO other book dealing with this subject is available to collectors. While I have managed to gather some information from a few German books that partially deal with the topic, I have never found a standalone source to serve this purpose, until now.
Mike’s amazing book was released in early 2017. It already has the collecting community raving. Its scholarship and photographs are topnotch. We all owe Mike high praise for his efforts. We strongly urge you to purchase the book directly from Mike. It is a MUST-HAVE reference for any Imperial German militaria collection. You may contact him by email at
makelso77@aol.com. You will be glad you did!

 

We also have had the good fortune to purchase several examples of the shoulder boards and straps that appeared in Mike’s book directly from him. We are adding a few in new updates over the next several months.
Naturally, we will indicate on which of Mike’s book pages the shoulder board/strap can be found.
The latest are listed below.

 

 

23-502 SHOULDER BOARD - PRUSSIA - ENLISTED MAN/NCO - HUSAREN-REGIMENT NR 10. This is a single shoulder board for a Magdeburgisches Husaren-Regiment Nr 10 Enlisted Man/NCO. The regiment was founded in 1813 and garrisoned at Stendal, where it was attached to the IV. Armeekorps. The regiment saw action in the Napoleonic Wars and in other conflicts up to and including WW I. After the end of WW I, it was disbanded.
The shoulder board measures 2" x 5 ¼." The
shoulder board’s surface is dark-blue. A heavy design of small yellow chevrons is set against the blue surface. The subdued metal regimental designation, "10," is set in its center. It was worn on a feldgrau attila, as evidenced by the reverse’s feldgrau backing. It is in very fine condition.  It appears on page 290 of Under Arms for the Kaiser: Shoulder Insignia of the German Army’s Regiments 1871-1918, by Michael Kelso. Being featured in this excellent reference book certainly enhances its value! $325.00  

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23-504 SHOULDER BOARDS - BADEN - 5 SINGLE - INFANTERIE-REGIMENT NR 114. This is a most interesting group of five enlisted man/NCO’s 6. Badisches Infanterie-Regiment Kaiser Friedrich III Nr 114 shoulder straps. These shoulder boards show the historical progression of the regiment from prior to 1852 through 1888 and beyond. The regiment was formally founded in 1867, although it had been in existence prior to 1852. [It was listed as a Bataillon rather than a Regiment. It was only after 1867 in the Imperial German era that it was recognized as a full strength Regiment. During the pre-1867 period, it was first known as Füsilierbataillone Nr 1 and later as Füsilierbataillone Nr 2. In the post-1867 era, its three Bataillone were garrisoned at Konstanz, Wachtkommando, and Burg Hohenzollern. The Regiment was attached to the XIV. Armeekorps. The five shoulder straps are described below.

 

 

 

 

 

1). I do not have a date when this strap was used. Füsilierbataillone Nr 1 was in use prior to 1 November 1852. So, this strap is more than one-hundred-sixty-years-old and is the oldest uniform item that Der Rittmeister Militaria has ever offered. The strap measures 1 ¾" x 5." The obverse is white, embroidered in red with the Bataillon designation, "1." The strap is in amazing condition. Obviously, due to its age, the white shows signs of soiling.

 

 

 

 

 

2). This example is for Füsilierbataillone Nr 2, which succeeded Füsilierbataillone Nr 1. The unit was in place from 1 November 1852 through 26 October 1867 when it was upgraded and formally became the 6. Badisches Infanterie-Regiment. The shoulder strap measures 1 ¾" x 5." The surface of the strap is red and the Bataillon designation, "2," is chain stitched in yellow.

 

 

3). This example was used from its inception on 26 October 1867 through 1 July 1871. The shoulder strap measures 1 ¾" x 5." It is green and has the regimental number, "6," embroidered in red on the obverse. The shoulder strap is in very fine condition considering its age.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4). This example was used from 1871 through 1888, prior to Kaiser Friedrich III’s ascension to the Imperial German throne. It measures 1 ¾" x 5." It is green and embroidered in red with the regimental designation, "114," which it assumed in 1871 with the German Empire’s creation.

 

 

 

5). This example was used after 2 August 1888 until the Regiment changed from wearing dunkel-blau (dark-blue) uniforms to feldgrau. It measures 1 ¾" x 5." It is green and features Kaiser Friedrich III’s royal crowned cypher. Friedrich III succeeded his father, Kaiser Wilhelm I, and sat on the throne for a mere ninety-nine days in 1888, before dying from throat cancer and being succeeded by his son, Wilhelm II.

 

 

 

 

 

 

All five shoulder straps are in fine condition and show signs of having been mounted for display. Each shoulder strap is accompanied by an old typewritten tag. Clearly, these came from either a German museum or collection. They afford a unique opportunity to see how a regiment progressed from its inception through to WW I’s end. These five shoulder straps appear on pages 118 and 153 of Under Arms for the Kaiser: Shoulder Insignia of the German Army’s Regiments 1871-1918" by Michael Kelso. Being featured in this excellent reference book certainly enhances its value! $550.00  

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23-505 SHOULDER STRAP - PRUSSIA - WAFFENMEISTER - ARTILLERIE-REGIMENT - WAR MINISTRY PROTOTYPE TAG. This is a very important and historically significant shoulder strap. First, it is for a very senior Artillerie Regiment NCO in the rank of Waffenmeister (Master Gunner). The rank itself is uncommon, but what makes this so important is that it has an Imperial German War Ministry prototype tag attached to it. The War Ministry was responsible for a wide range of projects that both organized and kept the German Army running smoothly. One of the Ministry’s functions was to come up with improvements to all types of uniforms, headdress, gear, and so on. Working with various suppliers in Germany, the Ministry decided what new types of items were to be used in the future. They created a prototype that eventually became a standardized Army item.
This particular shoulder strap was the first of its kind. Such examples were stored at the War Ministry in an archive for reference once the item was changed or new one was approved. I have secured several items with the War Ministry tags attached over the years. [Believe me, these items are very special and SCARCE, so I leap at the opportunity to secure them when offered]!
The shoulder strap measures 2 ½" x 5 ½." It features various shades of gold, blue, black, and green bullion tape along three of its four edges. The strap’s center is made of red felt, as are thin lines of trim on its extreme edges. The red center displays a pair of crossed, gold-toned cannons, each of which measures 2" in length. A special metal insignia appears below the crossed cannons, shaped into a shield that measures ¾" x 1 ¼." It features of a gold-toned Hohenzollern Eagle against a dark background and beneath a Hohenzollern Crown. The royal cypher "FW" appears on the Eagle’s chest. It is similar to that found on pickelhauben wappens. The strap’s reverse displays a blue backing. The obverse’s condition is perfect, while its reverse is marked by one moth nip.
The faded white War Ministry tag is attached to a string that is looped through the buttonhole where the strap would be attached to a tunic. It measures 2 ¾" x 5." One side has the red wax seal of the Kriegsministerium (War Ministry). The string’s other end has a wax seal over it to keep it with the strap. It features some period writing on it that describes the item and its location within the archive. Below that (in English) in a fountain pen’s black ink is the notation "Shoulder strap from the uniform of a German Master Gunner." Since the notation was made with a fountain pen, it tells us it was written more than seventy-years ago when such pens were commonly used.
The opposite side features the words below in bold lettering (rendered in old German Fraktur).

 

Probe (Sample)
Schulterslappen für Waffenmeister (Shoulder Strap for a Weapons Master)

 

Below these two lines is some of the boilerplate for the listing of War Ministry items, as well as dates in April 1907 (some one-hundred-ten years-ago). This may well have been the last update for the pre war shoulder straps. After that, the Imperial German Army began to phase in feldgrau uniforms and updated shoulder boards/straps.
This very special shoulder board was used in the just-released book Under Arms for the Kaiser: Shoulder Insignia of the German Army’s Regiments 1871-1918 by Michael Kelso on pages 381-382. It is one of the rarest shoulder straps that we have ever offered.
$350.00  

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

33-343 BRAUNSCHWEIG - TOTENKOPF CAP DEVICE - NCO/ENLISTED MAN - HUSAREN-REGIMENT NR 17 OR INFANTERIE-REGIMENT NR 92. A total of four Imperial German Army regiments used the Totenkopf. They included Prussia’s 1. Leib-Husaren-Regiment Nr 1 and 2. Leib–Husaren-Regiment Nr 2, along with the Duchy of Braunschweig’s Husaren-Regiment Nr 17 and Infanterie-Regiment Nr 92. [It is interesting to note that the Totenköpfe used by Prussia and Braunschweig were completely different from one another. Those used by Prussia evolved to be used during the Third Reich Period by a combination of SS and Panzer troops. Finding items using the Braunschweig Totenkopf pattern helps us to be sure that they came from the Imperial Period and not the Third Reich].
Today we are offering a Totenkopf device for an enlisted man/NCO’s mütze or schirmmütze from one of the two Braunschweig Regiments. The device measures 1" x 1." It has a first-rate patina. None of the mounting attachments are present on the reverse. It would make a fine addition to any display.
$175.00  

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

34-91 DOILY/PLACE MAT CELEBRATING WW I ALLIED VICTORY. During WW I and shortly thereafter, patriotic objects were numerous and varied. As with so many wars, the initial enthusiasm and excitement soon devolved into grimness as the war years dragged on and on. By the war’s end, few families in Europe had not been affected by family members’ or friends’ deaths and the sheer horror of all-out war. While Germany, Austria, Hungary, Bulgaria, and Turkey had little to celebrate, the Allies found validation in victory. The item we are offering today details the winning camp’s attitude.
This 11" x 14" doily/place mat revels in the Allied victory. It features an exquisitely delicate lace background that contains an 8" x 10" pink satin frame several inches inside it. A smaller, 3" x 4" panel within the pink frame displays the date "1919." Each of the date’s numbers has been stitched from the various, victorious Allies’ national flags. For example, Great Britain’s Union Jack appears on the initial "1," along with Japan’s flag. France and Australia appear on the "9." The second "1" features the USA’s flag by itself. [This is only a partial list. Most of the major nations that participated in the war, including Belgium, appear on the various numbers. Below the numbers is a legend that proclaims "Souvenir de France."
This lovely piece is in excellent condition.
$50.00  

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

40-679 CABINET PHOTOGRAPH - KAISER WILHELM II - WEARING 1. LEIB-HUSAREN-REGIMENT NR 1's UNIFORM - MOUNTED ON HIS HORSE. Imperial German era photographs and postcards of Kaiser Wilhelm II generally feature him in the uniforms of either the Regiment der Garde du Corps or the 1. Leib-Husaren-Regiment Nr 1. Members of these two regiments sported very unusual headdresses that were quite different from those worn by any other Imperial German Army Regiments. This particular cabinet photograph (an oversized CdV), which shows the Kaiser mounted on his horse, is no exception. The photo measures 3 ¼" x 6 ." The Kaiser is wearing a foul weather canvas cover over his busby, so its wappen and kolpak cannot be seen. [It is the first photo I have ever seen that features the Kaiser wearing a foul weather cover over his busby, although I have seen photos of him sporting a covered pickelhaube].  Its feldzeichen is stuck in place (as is correct), and he has the busby’s chin scales pulled down under his chin. His attila is a parade rather than a dienst (daily-wear) version. His cross belt, decorations, and shoulder boards are those of a Generalfeldmarschall.

 

 

 

The cabinet photograph’s bottom indicates that it was produced by the noted photographic house of Georg Scheppmeyer, one of Germany’s premiere studios and a purveyor to the royal household. $95.00  

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19-283 XKG CUSTOM-FRAMED NAVAL ADMIRAL PATENT & PHOTOGRAPH SIGNED BY PRESIDENT THEODORE ROOSEVELT. Theodore Roosevelt is among the most revered United States Presidents. He served in many governmental roles, such as the Assistant Secretary of the Navy in 1897. When war broke out with Spain in 1898, he resigned and formed the Rough Riders in concert with Col. Leonard Wood. [Wood had won the USA’s Medal of Honor for action against the Apaches, and later served as the U.S. Army’s Chief of Staff]. The Rough Riders were (also known as the 1st U.S. Volunteer Cavalry or 1.U.S.V.). During the campaign Wood, its founding regimental commander, assumed the Brigade’s command after its assigned commander fell ill. Roosevelt then was promoted to colonel, took command of the regiment, then led it on the famous charge up San Juan Hill.

 

 

[PLEASE NOTE the following side notes: the 10th U.S. Cavalry regiment was a flanking regiment consisting of African-American troopers under white officers. Also known as "Buffalo Soldiers," they had fought Indians in the American West, with John J. ("Black Jack") Pershing as one of their officers. Pershing later commanded U.S. Army troops in France during WW I. Theodore Roosevelt finally received the Medal of Honor in 2001 from President Bill Clinton for his actions during the Spanish-American War. Roosevelt had been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1906. Both his Medal of Honor and Nobel Peace Prize are enshrined in the White House’s "Roosevelt Room." Finally, Roosevelt’s son, Brigadier General Theodore (Ted) Roosevelt, Jr. (1887-1944) received the Medal of Honor for his actions during the 6 June 1944 Invasion of Normandy. He went ashore with the first wave of American troops onto Utah Beach. Just thirty-six days later he died of a heart attack].
Following the Spanish-American War’s end, Roosevelt returned to New York and became its Governor. He was elected Vice President to William McKinley when the latter ran for his second term. McKinley won the election but was assassinated in 1901, resulting in Roosevelt becoming the 26th U.S. President. He filled out the balance of McKinley’s second term, then won a full term of his own in 1904. Roosevelt was a reformer who pushed for change and became well known for his battles with monopolies formed by the U.S. banking, steel, and oil companies. He gained the nickname of "Monopoly Buster" for these hard-fought bitter battles.
Roosevelt was also a proponent of making the U.S. a world power. At the time, the U.S. and Japan were both emerging powers of increasing influence when compared to Europe’s powerhouses Great Britain, and Germany, followed by France and Russia. Following the 1898 defeat of Spain, the U.S. had acquired foreign possessions in Asia. Roosevelt now implemented his "Big Stick" diplomacy in order to project the USA’s naval and political power. To that end, Roosevelt sent the U.S. Navy’s strongest ships (the "Big Stick") on an extended worldwide cruise. The fleet (essentially the Atlantic Squadron), went on what turned into a fourteen-month, 43,000 nautical mile voyage, with some 14,000 American sailors aboard sixteen battleships. This became known as the Great White Fleet (since the ships had been painted in their normal white Summer livery with gilt, red, white, and blue accents at their bows). They were a pre-dreadnaught variety, but a powerful fleet nonetheless.
The fleet was assembled in December 1907 at Hampton Roads, Virginia, then proceeded to the West Coast for refitting before launching the Asian portion of the journey. The original commander of the fleet was Rear Admiral Robley D. Evans. Due to ill health, he was replaced on the West Coast by Rear Admiral Charles S. Perry. The fleet was broken down into four Divisions of four ships each. The commander of the 3rd Division, Captain Nathan E. (Kossuth) Niles (1849-1913), sailed aboard the U.S.S. Louisiana (BB 19). [The U.S.S. Louisiana was one of the fleet’s more modern ships and part of the Connecticut Battleship Class (the U.S.S. Connecticut was the Great White Fleet’s flagship). The U.S.S. Louisiana was commissioned in 1906 and stayed active until 1920, when she was struck from the list of Navy ships. The Louisiana was scrapped in 1923].

 

Since the U.S.S. Louisiana was one of the fleet’s modern ships, she was commanded by one of the Navy’s more experienced captains, the acting Commodore of the 3rd Division. Niles first joined the Union Army (yes, Army) during the Civil War in 1864 as a member of the 142nd Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment. The following year he was posted to the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland as a cadet. His naval career extended from 1865 until 1911, when he reached the mandatory age of retirement. He was buried at Arlington National cemetery following a fatal heart attack at a New York book store in 1913.
The Great White Fleet’s cruise consisted of four legs. Earlier legs had included stops in the Caribbean, South America, Australia, and Japan. The cruise was intended to particularly impress Japan that the U.S. was a major world player with an impressive naval force that should be treated respectfully in the Pacific. The fleet made port at Yokohama where it was received hospitably. The fourth and final leg began at in Manila at the USA’s Subic Bay naval base. The fleet arrived on 7 November 1908, then departed on 1 December 1908. It made port in Ceylon, Egypt (exiting through the Suez Canal), then Gibraltar, before returning to Hampton Roads. During the stop in Manila, Niles received word that President Roosevelt had promoted him to Rear Admiral.
It is THIS very promotion document (termed a "patent" in Imperial Germany) we are offering today. Such documents were extremely ornate during that period. The document was prepared on 12 November 1908. Niles’ actual promotion from Captain to Rear Admiral, however, occurred on 27 November 1908, just days before the fleet began its homeward leg. Thus, before the fleet’s departure on 1 December, Niles was confirmed to Flag rank. The actual document was waiting for him upon his return to Hampton Roads.

 

The patent measures 15" x 17." It was folded at some point, and the fold remains visible. That said, the document is in excellent condition with no foxing, tears, rips, or etc. It is as handsome as it was more than one-hundred-years ago when it was issued and signed by Theodore Roosevelt. Roosevelt’s name appears atop the preprinted document in large letters. The document states that Niles was promoted to Rear Admiral effective 12 November 1908. Theodore Roosevelt’s very bold signature appears at the document’s bottom. The document is countersigned by the Secretary of the Navy, Victor H. Metcalf (1853-1936). He served in that capacity from 1906 through most of 1908. Metcalf officially retired effective 1 December 1908, so this was one of his final acts as Secretary of the Navy. The document is also countersigned by the Registrar of the United States. A blue foil seal bearing the U.S. Navy’s Coat-of-Arms appears on the document’s lower left side above the latter two signatures.
Flanking the document is one of Theodore Roosevelt’s most famous photographs. He stands with his hand on a massive world globe exuding a world leader’s stern confidence. His policies placed the USA firmly on the path to political and military dominance. With the election of Theodore’s cousin, Franklin D. Roosevelt, in 1932, the U.S. continued its rise to the pinnacle of world leadership by the conclusion of WW II.
[This document was framed for my personal enjoyment, so we spared no expense on the project. Due to the frame’s size and the level of materials that I requested, it cost me nearly $1,000 to complete. I wanted to pay homage to the man I consider one of the greatest American Presidents. I felt that such an incredible piece of American history deserved nothing but the BEST. We accomplished the feat at a premiere framer in our area after spending more than hour selecting every detail of what you see presented in the accompanying photographs].

 

The overall frame measures a whopping 28" x 35." It requires a good-sized wall to properly display it! The frame’s molding is made of richly sumptuous burlwood instead of the gilt that often appears on high-end framing jobs. We wanted to evoke the ambiance one might have expected to find in the Captain’s cabin aboard the U.S.S. Louisiana. When properly polished, the burlwood simply glows the way a fine cigar does when lit and enjoyed.
The promotion document and Teddy Roosevelt’s photograph are double-matted inside two separate windows within the frame. The double-matte’s top layer is made of pale beige suede material imprinted with a slightly darker brown pattern that mimics that on the burlwood frame. As previously noted, the promotion patent measures an impressive 15" x 17." Roosevelt’s photograph measures 7" x 10." Each item is once more outlined with more burlwood trimmed on all sides with thin strips of elegant, black wood. Often matting is just colored cardboard, but that simply would NOT do for this presentation. When he finished the project, the framer begged me to allow him to display it in his store!
I have enjoyed this piece for many years. I was especially proud in 2008 when the 100th anniversary of the document’s signing came to pass. I am including some copies of photographs that will enhance the document’s history, which I have described below.

 

1. A group photograph of Captain Niles and other senior officers from the cruise of the Great White Fleet in their full-dress uniforms, complete with their fore-and-aft caps (Zweispitzen).

2. Another photograph of several Great White Fleet officers. They are posed in regular-duty uniforms and headdresses. It provides a closer look Captain Niles.

3. A photograph of a large group of officers at a garden tea party, including Captain Niles, held in Tokyo in 1908. A Japanese officer is in the front row.

4. A photograph of the U.S.S. Louisiana (BB19) as she appeared on the Great White Fleet’s cruise.

5. A photograph of Secretary of the Navy Victor Metcalf, whose signature appears on the document along with those from Teddy Roosevelt and the U.S. Registrar.

 

This magnificent presentation is ready for a new owner to enjoy. [Due to its size and weight, we will have it professionally packed in a custom carton to ensure its safe arrival to its new owner. Shipping costs will be quoted when you are ready to order]. $4,995.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Click here for more images)

 

 

 

Links to Our Pages

 

Der Rittmeister Merchandise Pages: (Click on Pictures or Words)

Badges: Wound/Veterans/Shooting Prizes, etc.


Boxes (Patriotic) & Cigarette Cases

Bronzes/Busts/Statuettes & Figurines

Colonial Memorabilia
   

Desk Pieces & Accessories

Documents Nr 1: Awards AND Decorations
Included

Documents Nr 2: Patents, etc. (Paper Only)

Fan Gear (Der Rittmeister Militaria Clothing, etc.)

Field Gear & Soldiers' Personal Effects
 
Flags/Banners & Accessories

Flight Qualification Badges (Imperial)

Imperial German Air Service Nr 1:Artifacts,  Personalities, Groups, Shoulder Boards

Imperial German Air Service Nr 2: Documents, Books, etc.

Imperial German Regiment der Gardes du Corps & More

Imperial German Headdress Nr 1: Pickelhauben
/Wappens/Accessories

Imperial German Headdress Nr 2: Busbies/Mützen/Tschapkas/Visor Caps, etc.

Imperial German Headdress Nr 3: Reference Materials/Guides/CD's & DvD's

Iron Crosses & Related Materials

Just In from Germany: Newest Items! ALL items start here!

Medal Bars & Ribbon Bars

Miniatures & Boutonnieres

Navy (Imperial German): Documents/Swords/Daggers/Badges/Cap Tallies/Books

Orders & Decorations Nr 1: 4 Major German Kingdoms & Central Powers, Post War

Orders & Decorations Nr 2:Grand Duchies/Duchies/Free States, etc.

Paper & Wood Artifacts: Books/Photos/Albums/Maps/Artworks (framed paintings)

Patriotic Domesticware Nr 1: Fine Tableware/Steins/Glassware/Porcelain

Patriotic Domesticware Nr 2: Wooden/Metal/Cloth/Embroidered  Household Items
 

Patriotic Jewelry Nr 1: Rings/Bracelets/Pendants, etc.

Patriotic Jewelry Nr 2: Pins

Postcards Nr 38: German Royalty-Kaiser Wilhelm I/Kaiserin Auguste Viktoria ONLY

Postcards Nr 40: Photo Albums/Original/Framed/Cabinet Photos/Cartes Des Visite (CdV's).

Postcards Nr 42:Imperial German Air Service & All Aviation-Related.

Postcards Nr 43:Imperial German Armed Service & All Army-Related.

Postcards Nr 44:Kaiserliche Marine & All Navy-Related.

Postcards Nr 45:Other Imperial German/Central  & Allied Powers Royalty and Nobility

Ranglistes: Imperial German Army/Navy & Imperial German References on CD

Royalty & Nobility (German): Personalities, Swords/Daggers/ Portraits, Memorabilia

Shoulder Boards

Signed Photos/Documents/Autographs from German Military/Nobility/Royalty

 

Stickpins

Swords/Daggers/Edged Weapons & Accessories

Table Medals

Uniforms & Related Accessories

Vivat Ribbons

Wooden Display Products (Helmet & Visor Stands)

Zeppelin & Balloon Memorabilia

Der Rittmeister Content Pages:


Return to our Home Page
             

How to Order from Der Rittmeister Militaria

A Brief Intro
to Der Rittmeister Militaria
 
Information about Late Great Author & Painter Jack D. Hunter