Der Rittmeister Militaria, LLC. Imperial German Merchandise: Imperial German Navy: Documents, Navy Swords & Daggers, Badges, Uniforms, Navy Headdress (Schirmmützen, mützen, tropical helmets, tschakos, fore & aft caps), shoulder boards, belts & buckles, Assorted Memorabilia, Cap Tallies, Books, etc. Updated on 26 November 2017.  Contact us @:kgreenfield@derrittmeister.com

Click here for Links to our Merchandise & Content Pages. This is just a sample of the wide variety of high quality items that we offer in our ever changing inventory!

 

 

Edged Weapons

 

 

13-978 IDENTIFIED NAVY OFFICER’S SWORD. Our offering today is for an identified Navy Officer’s Sword from a very specialized Kaiserliche Marine branch. His name was Theodor Schneider, and he was born 22 February 1887. He became an officer in April 1905. He served in the Navy during WW I and retired from active service on 31 May 1920. Schneider was a Navy official who held the position of Marine=Zahlmeister. A Zahlmeister was a paymaster. [In the Imperial German Army, the regimental officer assigned to duty as a Zahlmeister wore a pickelhaube/kugelhelm with different fittings that differentiated his rank, (a point to remember)]. Schneider’s career was centered around ships that laid mines. He served as the paymaster for a single ship as well as a Flotilla.
This sword that once belonged to Schneider is in remarkable condition. One of the first things that you will notice in the photos attached to our description is that the sword’s back-strap is SILVER, unlike the brass used on the rest of the sword. [Indeed, most naval swords display all-brass fittings]. The silver trim extends from the Lionshead down the back-strap’s length. The grip that protrudes from the Lionshead’s mouth is all-brass, as is the rest of the sword’s furniture. The handle appears to be either bone or (possibly) ivory. [Its toning leads us to guess that it is ivory]. The handle’s wrap is made of gold-toned wire. The Lionshead’s eyes are the traditional naval green and red glass, replicating a ship’s port and starboard red and green running lights.
A lock-down plate that secures the sword in its scabbard extends down from the sword’s guard. Theodor Schneider’s name appears on the latter piece. The scabbard is made of leather (in fine condition) with three different brass fittings. Mounted on two of them are the rings by which the sword was hung from the sword-belt’s hangers. The sword blade is engraved on both sides with naval motifs.
Imperial German Navy swords are obviously much scarcer than those from the Imperial German Army, due to Army’s larger numbers. One for so specialized a rank increases its rarity. This is an extremely lovely, unusual, and rare sword that would make a fine addition to any naval collection. We are including a photocopy of naval Rangliste research about Schneider.
$2,295.00     

 

 

 

 

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13-625 IDENTIFIED NAVY OFFICER SWORD. This is a typical naval officer’s sword in good condition. It measures 36" in length from its lionshead’s top to the bottom of the drag. The triple-wire wrapped grip looks like it might be made of walrus tusk rather than ivory. It sports some dark striations that make me suspect this, but I am no ivory/walrus tusk expert! The lionshead does not have glass chips for eyes, just a plain brass finish. The sword hilt’s folding lock mechanism is engraved with the owner’s last name, Röder. A quick look in one of my German naval research works revealed his full name was Alfred Röder. He entered the Kaiserliche Marine in 1912. He later saw service as a Kriegsoffizier with Lehrkommando 350, in July 1944. His rank was as an Oberleutnant zur See. I did not find information on his WW I service in my brief search.
The blade, which measures 30 ½" is engraved with naval designs. The engraving is somewhat faded from age. The blade has several small black spots on it where it is slightly corroded. They do not detract from the blade’s overall appearance. The manufacturer’s name is listed on the blade’s non cutting edge, but has been somewhat obscured by one of the black marks. It reads "obrecht Hoflieferant Berlin." Hoflieferant means "purveyor to the king’s court." The leather scabbard is in pleasing condition. It has the traditional two leather sections with three brass trim and adornment areas. Two scabbard rings are present.
Overall, it is a well made, engaging naval officer’s sword.
$2,095.00

 

 

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07-52 KINDER OR CADET NAVY OFFICER SWORD. Kinder (child's or children's) Swords or Kinder Sabels are a unique sub-collecting area within Imperial German edged weapons. Members of the nobility who had sons often dressed the youngsters in a variety of uniforms which often were duplicates of their own. Of course, with the young boys being much smaller than Papa everything was scaled down, including the swords, and thus we have Kinder Swords. This "downsizing" continued on to items such as pickelhauben and even decorations. The latter evolved into the Prinzengroße (prince-sized) decorations which during WW I were favored by certain members of nobility in items such as Iron Crosses and even flight badges. Having given a bit of background on Kinder Swords, it is time to describe the item being offered here.
What we have is a very unique Kinder or young Cadet Navy Officers Sword. It is faithful in most details to its larger counterpart. It has glass eyes in the lionshead and has double folding guards, one of which shows the crowned fouled anchor. The grip appears to be a yellowed enamel as opposed to ivory or walrus tusk and is gilt wire wrapped. There is a chip high on the grip near the lionshead, but it is not detractive to the overall sword. The scabbard is the proper leather and metal. There is a small chain that serves as the hanger from the two loops on the scabbard. The blade is not engraved but that is not uncommon in the smaller swords. It does bear hallmarking from WKC, which I find to be most interesting. The blade shows a fair amount of dirt and could stand a bit of cleaning. The length of the sword from the top of the lion to the tip of the scabbard is about 33". The blade measures 29" and the scabbard itself measures 29 3/8".
This is the first time that I have seen an example such as this -- it would make a fine companion to a full-sized Navy Sword or Dagger.
$895.00

 

 

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13-696 NAVY DAGGER PIN. In the past we have offered miniatures of the German naval dagger. We have never offered one quite like this! This miniature was intended either as a tie tack or as a lady’s pin. It has a safety on the reverse. The attaching pin is mounted to the scabbard’s reverse. The dagger actually can be withdrawn from its scabbard, to which it is attached by a very fine gold-toned chain. When withdrawn, we see that the blade is plain, with a high-silver finish. The overall dagger length (in the scabbard) is 2 1/4." When withdrawn from the scabbard, the dagger measures 1 1/2" in length. The scabbard by itself measures 1 1/2."
It is a very handsome decorative piece which can be worn by that special person (or you) on dress-up occasions!
$695.00

 

 

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07-42 MINIATURE KAISERLICHE MARINE OFFICER SWORD. A very high quality example of the miniature Navy Officers Sword. It features a Lionshead and has the fouled anchor and crown of the Navy. Plain blade and the scabbard has about 50% of its paint which replicates the leather of the full size example. This would make a very nice desk item or perhaps even a letter opener. $375.00

 

 

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Uniforms: Headdress/Shoulder Boards/Belts/Buckles/Etc.

 

20-315 KAISER WILHELM II’S SINGLE GROßADMIRAL’S SHOULDER BOARD. This is a single Großadmiral’s shoulder board that once adorned Kaiser Wilhelm II’s uniform. Only six men achieved this exalted rank in the Imperial German Navy’s history. These men included:

 

 

 

 

1901 - Kaiser Wilhelm II (1859 – 1941)
1901 - King Oskar II of Sweden (1829 – 1907)
28 June 1905 - Hans von Koester (1844 – 1928)
4 September 1909 - HRH Prinz Heinrich of Prussia (1862 – 1929)
27 January 1911 - Alfred von Tirpitz (1849 – 1930)*

*[Promoted on an Honorary Basis without Patent, and thus NOT
authorized to wear his shoulder boards with the crossed batons
(the other five recipients could do so).]

31 May 1918 - Henning von Holtzendorff (1853–1919)

 

A Großadmiral’s rank in the Kaiserliche Marine was equivalent to that of a Generalfeldmarschall in the German Army, hence the use of crossed batons. The shoulder board is massive, measuring 2 ¼" x 5 ." It sports two gold bullion braids sandwiching a center silver bullion braid as the primary background. The silver bullion braid sports black chevrons that identify it as a naval shoulder board, since the Navy was part of the Reich (Empire) [not even such a mighty Kingdom as Prussia had possessed a Navy]. A magnificent set of crossed 2 ¼" Großadmiral’s batons is installed on the gold/silver bullion ropes. [Full-sized batons were issued to any man who achieved this rank, with the owner’s name noted on each one. Also please note: although the Großadmiral’s shoulder board batons have the same measurements as those on a Generalfeldmarschall’s shoulder board, the similarity ends there]. The Großadmiral batons’ attention to detail is amazing. If you look closely, you can see Prussian Crowns AND fouled Navy anchors! Instead of being silver, they are painted in THREE colors. Their primary background color is dark copper enamel, although much of it has worn off to reveal the gold beneath. The Hohenzollern Eagles and anchors are painted/enameled gold. Each baton tip is also gold with a small band of white enamel just below it.
The sumptuous detailing just keeps on coming! Kaiser Wilhelm II’s royal cypher is laid over the batons, with a beautiful Prussian Crown directly above it. Both are rendered in subdued brass that blends attractively with the batons. The obverse’s final item is a gilt-toned naval button displaying a crowned, fouled anchor. The reverse features a fine, dark-blue felt underlay, which ALWAYS appears on any Navy officer’s shoulder board. Some very light mothing shows on the fabric. An unusual circular brass backing plate holds the naval button in place.
Although we have offered Kaiser Wilhelm II’s shoulder boards in the past, this may be our rarest example yet!
11,495.00 REDUCED TO $9,995.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

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20-173 KAISER WILHELM II'S PERSONAL NAVY SEE-BATAILLON GENERALFELDMARSCHALL'S TSCHAKO IN FULL PARADE CONFIGURATION - COMPLETE WITH PARADE FEATHERS AND TWO STORAGE BOXES. Today we are offering perhaps the single most important artifact ever in the history of Der Rittmeister Militaria. In our day we have offered many fine articles of headdress, tunics, etc. from Germany’s royals. We even have offered several Schirmmützen that once belonged to Kaiser Wilhelm II, but never anything quite like this! Today we are pleased and honored to present his Majesty Kaiser Wilhelm II’s original officer’s tschako for the See-Bataillon.
As you are well aware, the See-Bataillon was attached to the Kaiserliche Marine, much as the U.S. Marine Corps is to the U. S. Navy and the British Royal Marines are to Her Majesty’s Royal Navy. The See-Bataillon provided shipboard security for the German Imperial Navy’s larger vessels. They were also charged with providing security at many German embassies and consulates around the world. In China one entire Bataillon (Bataillon Nr 3) was assigned as the embassy’s security force, and as additional military muscle to bolster the area’s other colonial troops. Our premiere offering today is the complete ensemble for the Kaiser’s See-Bataillon tschako.
The tschako’s body consists of superb felt for the body portion, and fine leather for its top, as well as the front and rear visors. The See-Bataillon's wappen is absolutely magnificent. It features an eagle with outspread wings. In the middle of its chest is a smaller Hohenzollern Eagle. Clasped in the larger eagle’s talons is an anchor base. Over its head sits a Hohenzollern Crown, with a royal stole streaming out from either side. The wappen is exquisitely frosted. All of its fire gilding remains intact. The tschako boasts a glorious pair of chin scales. The final exterior detail is its field badge, handsomely crafted of silver bullion. It sports a red center signifying the Reich. The exterior’s condition is excellent. I believe most would agree with me. It is in mint-minus condition.
The back interior visor is green leather. The sweatband is ultra soft doeskin. It exhibits an extra band of stitching that one only sees on top-of-the-line headdress. (Naturally, one expects this from the Kaiser!) Its liner is made from superior quality silk. It has a much tighter weave than that one normally sees. Again, this was an expensive helmet option, but if you were the Kaiser, expenses be damned! Wilhelm II’s gold Cypher is embossed on the silk liner. The entire interior is in excellent condition, with just a hint of gentle wear. In all likelihood, it was worn very rarely during Wilhelm II’s reign (1888 to 1918).
Some manufacturer’s production markings seem to appear under the liner, as well as the size, "55 1/4." This is around the average hat/helmet size for the period.
Now let us turn to the helmet’s feather bush. The cock feathers are white, red, and black, representing Germany’s national colors. It differs from a Prussian general’s feathers, which are just black and white. This is because the See-Bataillon was considered a national force rather than merely a Prussian unit. (The same held true for the Kaiserliche Marine). The very full cock feathers are attached to a special trichter, which slides in behind the field badge. The entire tschako takes on an entirely different look when the parade feathers are attached. Accompanying the parade feathers is an officer’s regular horsehair bush. It is a very full and beautifully-shaped. Should you to want to attach the bush, you will need to dismount the feathers. This is because only one of these very special trichters is included. Personally, I cannot imagine why one would wish to do so. The bush comes with the ensemble, however. It will be yours to do with as you wish when you purchase it. Another part of the ensemble is the tschako’s and parade feathers’ storage boxes. The tschako’s box measures 9" x 11" x 8." The box front displays a special-added label that reads "SeeBataillon." Immediately above the unit designation appears Wilhelm II’s similarly Hohenzollern-Crowned Cypher. The box is lined in white silk. The tschako rests inside the box, along with the field badge and the extra, horsehair parade bush. Originally, a leather strap secured the top to the box. Only a remnant of the leather strap remains.
The last piece of the presentation is a special, cylindrically-shaped case, which houses the parade feathers when they are not in use. I have seen similar cases in the past, housing generals’ trichters and feathers. Such cases always are far larger and more ornate than boxes holding lower officers’ horsehair trichters. This one has openings on both ends to facilitate removing and replacing the bush. The ends are appropriately marked "Oben (top)" and "Unten (bottom)." The box stands 11 3/4" high. It is 6 3/4" in diameter at the base. Its side displays a similar label to that seen on the tschako’s box, identifying it as Kaiser Wilhelm II’s property.
Again, we are extremely excited to share this with you. One often hears the term "museum piece" or "museum grade." This certainly applies here. Any collector fortunate enough to have this in his collection (as I do now), is the caretaker of a truly historic piece. I know many of you will flinch at its price. It is expensive, of that we have no doubt. In comparison, two or three years ago I was offered one of Wilhelm II’s feldgrau tunics and an army general pickelhaube. The price to me would have been €50,000. At today’s prices that would equal $74,000+! [Please allow sufficient time for the attached photographs to load. I believe you will find the wait well worth it]! $42,495.00 wbNov17
 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-875 GROßADMIRAL HANS von KOESTER’S PERSONAL EFFECTS GROUP - INCLUDING EPAULETTES/FORE AND AFT CAP/ETC. I first offered this group some ten years ago. The fellow who has owned it since then recently changed his area of interest, so I was thrilled to take it back in trade. (Items like this just do NOT become available often). Hans von Koester was one of six Imperial Period men (five Germans and one Swede) appointed as a Großadmiral. The rank was created in 1901, with Kaiser Wilhelm II (naturally) appointing himself the first rank holder. King Oskar II of Sweden was granted the same rank that year as a ceremonial gesture. Listed below are the six men who held the rank from 1901 until the empire’s end in 1918.

1901 - Kaiser Wilhelm II (1859–1941)

1901 - King Oskar II of Sweden (1829–1907)

28 June 1905 - Hans von Koester (1844–1928)

4 September 1909 - HRH Prinz Heinrich of Prussia (1862–1929)

27 January 1911 - Alfred von Tirpitz (1849–1930)*

[*Promoted on an Honorary Basis without Patent]

31 May 1918 - Henning von Holtzendorff (1853–1919)

 

The first two recipients were ceremonial appointments rather than direct commands. The third appointee, Hans von Koester, was the first "operational" admiral to receive the rank. He was promoted to Großadmiral in 1905 as a reward for his long service. He actually retired the following year (1906). The next to receive the rank was Prinz Heinrich, (one of whose tunics and officer’s summer Schirmmütze we are proud to offer). Heinrich held direct command in the Kaiserliche Marine and was a royal, so his appointment was not an à la Suite promotion. Heinrich was the second officer with a naval background to achieve the rank. Alfred von Tirpitz was the third. Please note, however, that von Tirpitz’s promotion must be viewed with an "asterisk." His promotion was WITHOUT patent. That is, he was a Großadmiral in title, but his rank was more of an à la Suite (honorary appointment).
[This somewhat confusing situation was evident on a von Tirpitz shoulder board that we offered several years ago, and on another that we are offering in this week’s update. Instead of a Großadmiral's crossed batons, the board displayed FOUR pips, which was the equivalent of a Generaloberst in the rank of Generalfeldmarschall. This was a rank often used by royals who held the Army’s rank of Generaloberst in the rank of Generalfeldmarschall, which actually was an à la Suite position. Prior to the institution of Großadmiral, the Imperial German Navy’s highest rank was a full Admiral, who wore TWO pips. The Navy had no equivalent to the Imperial German Army’s Generaloberst, who displayed THREE pips. The Navy simply skipped the rank! The number of shoulder board pips displayed on the four admirals’ ranks was as follows: a Konteradmiral wore NO pips; a Vizeadmiral displayed ONE pip; an Admiral boasted TWO pips; and a Großadmiral had NO pips, but displayed crossed batons.
The final man to achieve the rank was Henning von Holtzendorff. He assumed Alfred von Tirpitz’s role, and also did not exercise direct command after his promotion. In fact, he retired before the war’s end due to health problems (he died in 1919). Von Holtzendorff was replaced by Admiral Reinhard Scheer (the High Seas Fleet commander at 1916's Battle of Jutland/Skagerrak). Scheer was responsible for running the Navy, but was NOT awarded a Großadmiral's rank.

The following small group of Großadmiral Hans von Koester’s personal effects is absolutely marvelous.

 

PAIR OF GROßADMIRAL’S EPAULETTES. I have seen some superb shoulder boards and epaulettes over the years, including those from the Kaiser. Nothing, however, has ever touched the sublime beauty of these truly magnificent specimens. Their centers are made of gold silk! Wool or felt is normally used for background material, not silk. Each center is highlighted by a pair of crossed batons. The batons’ artistry sets them apart from any Army Generalfeldmarschall’s batons. Army batons usually are made of silver, rather than the exquisite enamel used by the Navy. These display four different colors: gold, white, red, and black. Neither epaulette displays any damage whatsoever to these magnificent batons. A massive silver eagle grasping a fouled anchor in its claws overlays each baton set. Just below a small gilt naval button on the epaulette’s tongue is a silver Kaiser Crown. The tongue also displays red and black piping on a white background. The use of red, black, and white (the national colors) indicates that the Kaiserliche Marine was under the Reich’s authority, not the Kingdom of Prussia’s.
More gold design work extends out from the silk field on which the batons and eagles are mounted. Massive gold ringlets flow down majestically around their edges. (They must have looked amazing when worn on the dress uniform)! The epaulettes’ undersides are covered in navy-blue wool, another sure sign that they are correct for the Kaiserliche Marine. A sliding brass clip arrangement allows them to be slipped onto the tunic.
Looking at these epaulettes and their superb condition, one would be hard pressed to believe they are more than one-hundred-years-old.

 

GROßADMIRAL’S UNIFORM CUFFS. Imperial German Navy Admirals' uniforms displayed gold bullion stripes that indicated the man’s rank. Daily-use tunics did NOT display shoulder boards, so rank was determined by the number of stripes on the cuffs. In a Großadmiral’s case, FOUR stripes designated his rank. Each of these stripes measures 9/16" in width. In addition to the rank stripes, a single wide band of gold bullion is present that measures 1 15/16" in width. Its bullion displays a wonderful patina, with gentle toning. Each cuff normally had a bullion Kaiser Crown attached, as well. Only one of them is present, which is NOT attached to the cuff. [We will show this in our photographs]. Each cuff is wrapped very neatly in some very old tissue paper. Both are most attractive.

 

FORE & AFT CAP (ZWEISPITZ) BELONGING TO ADMIRAL HANS von KOESTER. Naval officers wore two types of headdresses. First, for regular duty, was the Schirmmütze (visor cap). Second, for more formal occasions, often worn with a Gala Naval Uniform was the zweispitz (fore and aft cap). [Naval officers actually had three types of uniforms: daily wear, dress, and high-dress (Gala). Many officers did not even have a Gala uniform, unless they were of higher rank or were extremely wealthy]. In the USA, we more frequently associate fore and aft caps with naval headdresses from the 18th and early 19th Centuries. In the Kaiserliche Marine, an Admiral’s zweispitz was different from the other officers’. Von Koester’s zweispitz is significantly and magnificently more elaborate.
The zweispitz’s body is covered with close-cropped, very fine fur, perhaps seal. In addition to the golden coil that extends from the gilt navy button on the cap’s right side, the other huge difference is a 2 ½"bullion band that runs the length of the cap’s two sides. Each of the cap’s ends sports multiple silver bullion ringlets. Beneath the top row of silver ringlets is another row that is interspersed with silver, red, and black ringlets. The cap’s right side boasts a large and very elegant silk Reich's kokarde.
Turning to the interior, we see a very high-quality, light-brown leather sweatband. It is 100% complete and in excellent condition. If we look closely, in a place or two we can see some very slight sweat stains from where von Koester actually wore it! The white silk liner is flawless and in superb condition. His name, "von Koester," is embossed in gold on the white silk liner.

 

STORAGE CASE FOR ALL ITEMS LISTED ABOVE. This is a large storage case that measures 8 1/4" x 9" x 18." The case was used to store the epaulettes and zweispitz when not in use. It has a handle on the top that made it convenient for use when traveling. On the case’s front is a small plaque that measures 1 3/16" x 3 ½" and bears his name: "von Koester." When I originally bought the group many years ago, the case’s top half was separated from its bottom half. The hinges and screws that secured them had pulled loose. When I bought the group back, I decided to address the problem. Normally, I prefer to avoid restoration, but in this case I felt it was in order. So we inserted new screws in the original hinges and the case operates as it did more than one-hundred-years ago. The original key is attached to the handle!
Inside the case we see that the zweispitz is nestled at the bottom. Over it is a red silk platform. The platform performs two purposes. It separates the zweispitz from the contents at the case’s top. That is where the platform becomes the epaulettes’ storage stand. Each epaulette slides onto the platform and is secured. The tunic cuffs are folded in their tissue and laid at the top, which makes for a tidy package.

 

SILVER PRESENTATION PLATE FROM von KOESTER’S STAFF WHEN COMMANDER OF DER MARINE STATION den OSTSEE. This is an ultra high quality silver presentation plate. It measures 11" in diameter. The plate’s edges display very elaborate scrollwork accented with a floral motif.

At the plate’s top the following phrase is engraved.

"Unserem Hochverehrten Stationschef Admiral H. Koester"
(Our esteemed station-chief Admiral H. Koester)

At the plate’s bottom another engraving is presented.

"Die Offiziere der Marinestation der Ostsee"
(The officers of the Baltic Sea Marine Station)

An admiral’s flag is in the plate’s center. Below that is the presentation’s date, 22 März 1897. The plate’s reverse is highly tarnished and bears the manufacturer’s hallmark, as well as for .800 silver, and the initials "AP." The Marinestation Ostsee was the Baltic See Naval Station located in Kiel. Von Koester held this post from 1889 to 1903. It should also be noted that he is recognized as an Admiral, rather than the lower rank of Vizeadmiral. It is interesting to note that von Koester received the promotion in 1897, the same year as the plate! The plate is in amazing condition for its age.

 

 

COLOR POSTCARD AND DETAILED HISTORICAL INFORMATION OF HANS von KOESTER. We are including a period color postcard of Großadmiral Hans von Koester. We thought it important that you know what the man looked like. We also have some historical background on him that chronicles his long career.

 

 

 

Words cannot adequately describe the beauty, rarity, and historical importance of this group. If you are a collector of Kaiserliche Marine items, we have many other important items including Prinz Heinrich’s aforementioned group, an overcoat with shoulder boards for a Großadmiral, and numerous epaulettes for every officer rank up-to-and-including a Kapitän zur See. $29,995.00

 

 

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13-970 KAISERLICHE MARINE ADMIRAL’S ÜBERROCK. This is an amazing find for us at Der Rittmeister Militaria. Today we are offering a very special, full Admiral’s überrock. Finding tunics for General Officers is a hard task, although we are proud that our current inventory boasts tunics or complete General’s uniforms for Prussia, Württemberg, Saxony, and Braunschweig. Finding tunics for Kaiserliche Marine Admiräle is indeed a daunting task. Even tunics for junior officers are NOT easy to find. [We were blessed in the past to offer none other than Großadmiral Prinz Heinrich of Prussia’s überrock].
The Kaiserliche Marine possessed only four Admiräle levels. Unlike the Imperial German Army, which featured five Generals’ levels, the Navy did not sport a Generaloberst’s equivalent (the Army’s Generaloberst being its highest rank). The Navy Admiräle ranks included the four positions listed below, in lowest-to-highest order.

Konteradmiral
Vizeadmiral
Admiral
Großadmiral

For the most part, Admiral was the Kaiserliche Marine’s highest operational/tactical rank. Of the six men who achieved the Großadmiral’s rank, only ONE actually commanded fleet operations: Prinz Heinrich, Kaiser Wilhelm II’s younger brother. He commanded activities in the Baltic during WW I, and did not achieve his rank until 1909. The rest of the six included two who commanded the overall Kaiserliche Marine (Alfred von Tirpitz [1911] and Henning von Holtzendorff [1918]), and whose official titles were "State Secretaries of the Imperial Navy Office." Another, Hans von Koester, received the rank in 1905, primarily as a thank-you when he was approaching retirement. The final two recipients were royals (Kaiser Wilhelm II and King Oskar II of Sweden), both of whom received the rank in 1901, the year in which it was originated.
So, a man who achieved an Admiral’s rank was a very high level naval officer who commanded great responsibility within the Kaiserliche Marine. Today, we are offering just such a man’s überrock. [The classic naval überrock was a frock coat that extended down its wearer’s legs, rather than stopping near the waist as did most tunics]. Our überrock is made from fine-quality, dark-blue, buttery-smooth wool. It sports a double row of gleaming gilt buttons (five-per-side) that run down the uniform’s center. The buttons display fouled anchors with Hohenzollern Crowns above them. The überrock’s left breast features a row of sewn-in loops for displaying a ribbon bar. The loops’ total width is 2."
The shoulder boards are of the slip-on variety. Each features a small gilt Navy button, and the two silver pips typical of an Admiral’s shoulder boards. [It is one area where the Imperial German Navy’s shoulder boards differed from those belonging to the Army. For the Army, silver pips generally indicated an à la Suite officer, whereas gold pips signaled a staff or field-assigned officer. Navy shoulder boards were the exact opposite]. These shoulder boards feature "Russian rope" bullion, whose design displays alternating silver and gold rows. The silver bullion rope is imbedded with black chevrons. The shoulder boards have the dark-blue underlay characteristic of all Navy shoulder boards (a key point when confirming Navy status).
Each überrock sleeve displays a small gold bullion Hohenzollern Crown that measures 1 " x 1 ½." Each sleeve also reveals a wide
gold bullion tape band that measures 2," as well as two narrow gold bullion tape bands that each measure " in width. It is here that we discover an anomaly. Two bands indicate a Vizeadmiral, while three stand for a full Admiral. I examined the shoulder boards closely, checking their size, fit, and etc. It is clear to me that they have been attached for a long time, and are NOT recent additions. [It is my view (and that of other knowledgeable collectors and experts) that the überrock’s owner never took the tunic to a tailor to have the other bullion band added after his promotion. As it is likely that a man of his rank owned several uniforms, it is quite possible our offering was an earlier tunic that he did not upgrade. He simply inserted the correct shoulder boards once he was promoted from Vizeadmiral to Admiral. Then he later purchased other tunics with the correct sleeve markings and shoulder boards].
The überrock’s reverse exhibits six more (three per side) large gilt buttons in its vent area. Its interior displays a magnificent, superior quality black silk lining. The inside lining possesses three large pockets. Two are slash examples, while the third is the more conventional vertical example. The entire liner is in excellent condition.
The überrock is in stunning condition, overall. We are pleased to share it with you today.
$6,495.00

 

 

 

 

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15-498 PETTY OFFICER TUNIC WHO COMMANDED THE ROYAL LAUNCH OF THE S.M.Y. (S.M.S.) HOHENZOLLERN. The S.M.Y. (S.M.S.) Hohenzollern was the last and biggest of Kaiser Wilhelm II’s royal yachts to actually see use. It was put into service in 1893. His grandfather, Kaiser Wilhelm I, was a much more modest man, and not anywhere near as flamboyant as his grandson. His royal yacht was a paddle wheeler! Whether it was opulent yachts such as the Hohenzollern, or the many uniforms and headdresses he owned, Wilhelm II was certainly over the top. Nothing stated that more than the royal yacht. It was Wilhelm II’s desire that Germany become a major sea power to equal England. Again, nothing stated those desires more than the Hohenzollern. She was essentially a floating palace. She sailed all over Europe for Wilhelm II and his family’s state visits or just for vacations. The Hohenzollern even made a trip to New York, although the Kaiser did not sail with her. More than 6,000 people visited her while she was docked in New York early during the 20th Century.
The officers and men who served aboard the S.M.Y. Hohenzollern were the cream of the German Navy. Their status was somewhat similar to that of the Regiment der Garde du Corps (GdC) on land. Officers selected to serve aboard the Hohenzollern were marked for advancement and promotion once they had served their stint aboard the royal yacht. As with the GdC, the enlisted men and NCO’s were men of the highest conduct level and character. To serve aboard the Hohenzollern and attend the royal family was an honor, indeed. One of the most respected jobs aboard was assignment to the Kaiser’s launch. The launch was stored aboard the yacht, then used to ferry people to other vessels or the shore. Naturally, the sailors who manned the launch needed to look impressive, since they were the first German representatives foreigners saw, after the Kaiser himself. They would provide a strong first impression of the Kaiserliche Marine’s caliber. They had to be sharply dressed, impeccably neat, and striking, to say the least. The fortunate chosen men were honored to wear a special patch on their left tunic sleeves. [We will return to this a bit later in our description].
Our offering today is the tunic for the Chief Petty Officer (Chief Boatswain’s Mate) who commanded the Hohenzollern’s launch, and supervised the enlisted men who worked with him. The tunic is dunkel-blau (dark-blue). It is double breasted, with a double row of gilt, Navy buttons. It sports twin white kragenspiegel at the collar. The tunic has no shoulder straps. The tunic’s exterior is in excellent condition. One very small period repair appears on the left shoulder, which we will highlight in the photographs accompanying the description. The two devices sewn on the tunic’s left sleeve are what make the tunic historically important. The lower of the two is a stamped metal device on a patch, consisting of a fouled anchor beneath a Hohenzollern Crown. It measures 5" x 3 1/2." This indicates the petty officer’s rank. Directly above it is the very rare patch mentioned earlier. It is oval in shape, measuring 3 1/2" x 3." It is blue, with a yellow frame. Within the frame is a magnificent, yellow, embroidered Hohenzollern Crown over a pair of crossed, yellow, embroidered Großadmiral's batons.
Only men serving aboard the launch were entitled to wear this patch. [I believe the other sailors who served aboard the Hohenzollern had their own different patch. This one was extra special]. Inside the tunic is a wool lining, with black silk sleeves. Two pockets are on the tunic’s left and right side. A magnificent, gold-embroidered, set of initials appears on a black silk patch. As best as we can determine, the intricate initials read "CG." They are attached to the left side inner pocket. It might help those of you are interested in researching the original owner’s identity. I date the tunic from the period of 1901 to 1914 for the following reasons. Wilhelm II did not promote himself to Großadmiral until 1901. The crossed batons on the special patch indicate this rank. The Hohenzollern was pulled from service in 1914, right after the start of WW I. While she was armed, it was only lightly. Also, with WW I beginning, the time for light-hearted cruising was past.
This is an incredibly beautiful and rare tunic. If you are a serious naval collector, it would make a great addition to your collection.
$6,995.00

 

 

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15-425 PETTY OFFICER'S NAVY DRESS TUNIC - ATTACHED TO THE NAVAL AIR SERVICE. This is a wonderful NCO dress tunic from the Kaiserliche Marine. This particular dress tunic was often referred to as a "Monkey Suit" or "Monkey Jacket." What makes it even more desirable - the NCO was involved in the Imperial German Naval Air Service!
The tunic is made of fine-grade, dark-blue wool. It features silver buttons throughout. It boasts two rows of nine silver buttons down its center. Each button displays the Kaiserliche Marine’s fouled anchor, and the Kaiser’s Hohenzollern Crown. In addition, a device consisting of two more silver buttons joined by a chain allows the tunic to hang open, but remain semi-secured. The collars exhibit the Imperial Naval Air Service’s twin, silver-toned, winged propellers. They are similar to the winged propellers seen on the shoulder boards/straps of the Imperial Army Air Service. The left sleeve exhibits a Petty Officer’s Rating Badge. I believe it indicates that he is an armorer. His cuffs display silver bullion tape indicating he is an NCO (Petty Officer).
Extending upward from each sleeve are six more small, silver buttons. The tunic’s exterior is in very fine condition. I see only one small moth nip on the obverse and one on the reverse. Inside the tunic is a complete cotton lining with many depot marks. These indicate it came from a naval depot, and was first placed in service on 19 April 1911. It evidently was reissued from the depot in 1916. I can tell you that finding naval aviation items is difficult, and finding tunics is tougher yet. I once owned this tunic. I gladly took it in again as a trade on another item. In all my years of collecting, I have owned and seen two Navy aviation tunics. One was for an officer, then this one for an NCO.
It is an important tunic and a worthy addition to any aviation or tunic collection.
$2,495.00

 

 

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13-947 DEPOT-ISSUED ENLISTED NAVAL COASTAL ARTILLERY MAN’S DRESS TUNIC. This is a depot-issued, enlisted sailor’s coastal artillery unit dress tunic from the Kaiserliche Marine.  Enlisted sailors had the option to accept clothing that was issued to them by a naval depot, or to buy their own uniforms from a military effects shop. Today we are offering a depot-issued tunic.  Its interior reveals at least two different times that this particular dress tunic was issued, 1912 and 1913.  The tunic’s exterior is very clean.  Two rows of nine gilt-toned buttons each run down the tunic’s center.  In addition, five more gilt-toned buttons decorate  each tunic cuff.  The tunic also sports a handy accessory that serves as an extender.  Another two tunic buttons are attached to a chain.  The chain’s extra length allowed the wearer to leave his tunic front unbuttoned, while securing it in a semi open manner via the buttons on either end of the chain.  The tunic’s left sleeve displays a patch with the  winged artillery shell that was emblematic of the Coastal Artillery. Below that is a pair of “V’s.”    The tunic’s interior displays its various depot marks, as well as a pocket on its left side. Overall, the tunic’s condition is very fine. $825.00

 

 

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13-982 PRIVATELY-PURCHASED SHIPYARD DIVISION ENLISTED MAN’S DRESS TUNIC. This is an ultra-high-quality dress tunic ("monkey jacket") for an enlisted man who had duties in the Kaiserliche Marine’s shipyard division. A quick examination of the tunic reveals that it was privately-purchased by the sailor, NOT depot-issued. It is clearly prewar officers’ quality, although it sports NO tailor’s or manufacturer’s labels and does not indicate the sailor’s name. It is made from very high caliber dark-blue wool. The tunic boasts a double row of silver-toned buttons, nine per side (eighteen total). Since this tunic-style was never designed to be fully buttoned, a pair of buttons suspended from either end of a small extender chain actually held the tunic semi closed when worn. Six silver-toned buttons appear on each tunic cuff. The tunic’s interior sports an officers-style silk liner. This very elegant dress tunic is in marvelous condition and would display quite attractively. $650.00 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-980 NAVY ENLISTED MAN’S IDENTIFIED DRESS TUNIC. This is an identified, depot-issued enlisted sailor’s dress tunic (nicknamed a "monkey jacket"). It is made of dark-blue wool. Eighteen gold-toned buttons run down its center in a double row. Two more same-sized buttons appear on its lapels. Six smaller gilt buttons decorated each cuff. A dress tunic was never actually buttoned up. Instead, two buttons connected by a chain were attached through opposing buttonholes in order to preserve a neat appearance. All of the tunic’s buttons, whether large or small, display a fouled anchor beneath the Hohenzollern Crown.
The interior confirms that it was depot-issued through two separate depot marks, one of which is dated 18 December 1908. The sailor assigned to the tunic’s name, "Schmid," is sewn between the two depot marks. The tunic’s condition, both inside and out, is excellent.
$750.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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15-115 DRESS MESS JACKET FOR THE KAISERLICHER YACHT CLUB. The Kaiserlicher Yacht Club was the most exclusive yacht club in Germany. Its leading members were royalty and/or navy officers. Kaiser Wilhelm II was the principal member of the club and its Kommodore, which reflected his intense interest in boats, ships, and yachting. Aside from holding the rank of Großadmiral in the Kaiserliche Marine, the Kaiser was also involved in the activities of the Yacht Club. He even raced yachts in regattas of the club which included the S.M.S. Wunsch.
This tunic is very similar to a naval dress tunic in cut and general appearance. The lapels of the tunic have a combination of material and silk trim. The tunic, which is in excellent plus condition, features a double row of five large buttons on the chest and five smaller buttons on each sleeve. Each of these buttons are actually standard navy buttons that feature the fouled anchor and Hohenzollern Crown. This tunic is in excellent condition and would be a fine addition to any navy-related collection.  You will not see one of these every day, and certainly not in this condition.
$550.00..

 

 

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13-1028 NAVY - UNIFORM SCARF - SAILOR. Today we are offering an enlisted sailor’s neck scarf. Imperial German enlisted sailors wore neck scarves that attached to their jumpers, (the latter term being used for the shirts worn the sailors). This scarf hung down from the man’s shoulders in the back as a rectangular shape, then came forward in a v-shape onto the man’s chest. A small, lightweight, white fabric neckpiece was attached to the scarf’s ends and tucked down the inside the jumper’s front to hold it in place with two white ribbons. The scarf is dark-blue highlighted by three white stripes that run back from where the scarf is attached to the jumper’s v-neck at the front to decorate the rectangle’s outside edges in the back.
The white fabric neckpiece displays printed information that indicates the scarf was drawn from the naval depot that issued the uniforms, mützen, and other assorted gear that a sailor required to be properly and uniformly dressed. This information is stamped on two lines within a boxed outline. The first line reads "B.A.W." The second line indicates it was issued on "5 August 1916."
This makes a very handsome addition to a naval uniform.
$195.00  

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-1029 NAVY - IDENTIFIED UNIFORM SCARF - SAILOR. Today we are offering an enlisted sailor’s neck scarf. Imperial German enlisted sailors wore neck scarves that attached to their jumpers, (the latter term being used for the shirts worn the sailors). This scarf hung down from the man’s shoulders in the back as a rectangular shape, then came forward in a v-shape onto the man’s chest. A small, lightweight, white fabric neckpiece was attached to the scarf’s ends and tucked down the inside the jumper’s front to hold it in place with two white ribbons. The scarf is dark-blue highlighted by three white stripes that run back from where the scarf is attached to the jumper’s v-neck at the front to decorate the rectangle’s outside edges in the back.
The white fabric neckpiece displays printed information that indicates the scarf was drawn from the naval depot that issued the uniforms, mützen, and other assorted gear that a sailor required to be properly and uniformly dressed. Unlike the scarf listed above, the information is presented in a more unusual manner. It first displays the normal ink stamp that indicates it was issued 12 March 1913. Additional information has been embroidered in red thread, indicating that the sailor was in the "II Matrosen Division." Furthermore his name, "Mayer," appears on the tag, however, "Mayer" has been scratched out and replaced by "Gerold." "Gerold" appears in black ink once again on the other side.
This very handsome uniform addition is identified to two different sailors who both wore it, then were required to return all their depot-issued items so that they could be used again.
$225.00  

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-866 KAISERLICHE MARINE OFFICER’S CUFF LINKS. This is an extremely fine pair of officer’s cuff links from the Imperial German Navy. Each cuff link is made from a small, gold-toned, officer’s button bearing the Navy’s fouled anchor with a Kaiser Crown above it. The buttons have different makers, but their covers look the same. The cuff links are in mint condition. $200.00

 

 

 

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13-928 ENLISTED REICHSMARINE SAILOR’S DRESS TUNIC’S EXTENSION BUTTONS. After WW I and before the Kriegsmarine’s (1935-1945) creation, the Reichsmarine (1919-1935) served as Germany’s Navy. Most of its traditions were similar to those of the Kaiserliche Marine. Its uniforms, headdresses, etc., primarily were identical. One small change was that the Imperial German Period’s Hohenzollern Crown was deleted from its buttons, badges, and so on. Today we are offering a pair of extension buttons that were used on enlisted sailors’ dress tunics. These two buttons are attached to a small chain. The two buttons are then inserted into buttonholes on the tunic’s opposite sides. The chain allows the tunic to remain "closed" without being tightly buttoned. The two small buttons do NOT boast Hohenzollern Crowns. Instead, they are decorated only with the German Navy’s fouled anchor. Each button sports a manufacturer’s hallmark. While not totally correct for use on a Kaiserliche Marine dress tunic, they could be used in a pinch for display purposes. Naturally, they can be used on Reichsmarine tunics. The device is in top condition. $125.00

 

 

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13-852 SILVER-TONED KAISERLICHE MARINE UNIFORM BUTTONS - PEBBLED. These are silver-toned uniform buttons for an enlisted sailor’s tunic. The buttons measure 1" (20mm) in diameter. They are the larger sized that ran down a tunic’s center, NOT the smaller size used on the sleeves. The buttons have a frosted finish and bear the Kaiserliche Marine’s crowned, fouled anchor. We have a total of fourteen buttons in the following quantities, with a variety of markings on the reverse.

* Nine are marked "Extra Fein."

* Four are marked "Hochfeine Qualität."

* Four are marked "Ger. Ehlers - Kiel."

*One is "J&S Winns Sueine-Ludenscheid."

* Six are unmarked, with very short shanks.

It has been some time since we have offered Navy buttons. They typically sell very quickly. This is a good opportunity to pick up a few for future needs or to replace a tunic’s missing button. [The buttons are priced at $20.00 each. Buy four at $18.00 each, or eight or more at $15.00 Each]. ONLY 19 LEFT

 

 

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13-853 SILVER-TONED KAISERLICHE MARINE UNIFORM BUTTONS - PLAIN. These are silver-toned uniform buttons for an enlisted sailor’s tunic. The buttons measure 1" (20mm) in diameter. They are the larger sized that ran down a tunic’s center, NOT the smaller size used on the sleeves. The buttons have a mirrored finish and bear the Kaiserliche Marine’s crowned, fouled anchor. We have a total of twenty-four buttons in the following quantities, with a variety of markings on the reverse.

* Eleven are marked "A & S Kaiserliche Marine."

* Eight are marked "Extra Fein." Six Remain

* Seven are marked "Hochfeine Qualität."

It has been some time since we have offered Navy buttons. They typically sell very quickly. This is a good opportunity to pick up a few for future needs or to replace a tunic’s missing button. [The buttons are priced at $20.00 each. Buy four at $18.00 each, or eight or more at $15.00 Each].

 

 

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13-304 NAVY FREGATTENKAPITÄN'S "FORE AND AFT" CAP AND DRESS SHOULDER BOARDS WITH STORAGE BOX. This is a very fine example of a "fore & aft" cap (zweispitz) for an officer in the Kaiserliche Marine, along with his dress shoulder boards. It is the dress headdress for officers that was equivalent to a pickelhaube or busby, etc. for officers in the Imperial German Army. The storage box is an unusual shape so it can hold the cap in the bottom. The dress shoulder boards are placed on a special platform that fits over the cap, and are the first item one sees when opening the storage box. The exterior of the case has seen some extensive wear. It is in far less than perfect condition. However, it is this case that has protected the contents so well over the years. The "fore and aft" cap is in superb condition. All of its attachments and accouterments are in fine order. As we peek at the silk liner (which is also pristine), we see a gold embossed "P" displayed. On top of the case's specially designed platform are the dress shoulder boards for a Fregattenkapitän. This rank was  equivalent to a Commander (Lt. Col. in the U. S. Army, U. S. Marines, and U. S. Air Force) in the U.S. Navy.

 

It is a very handsome ensemble for discerning Navy collectors! $2,895.00

 

 

 

 

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13-529 RESERVE NAVY OFFICER FORE AND AFT CAP IN THE ORIGINAL STORAGE BOX. The fore and aft cap was the dress headdress for officers in the Kaiserliche Marine. These are never easy to come by. German naval reserve officers were more limited before WW I. Moreover, the Navy was a smaller service, with a lower number of officers. What I really like about this cap is its silk kokarde, the gilt intertwined rope, and the officer’s button with its reserve cross.  The cap’s exterior is in excellent condition. As we examine the cap’s interior, we find that the leather sweatband and the silk liner are in equally fine condition. The fore and aft cap comes in its original storage box. The boxes are very difficult-to-find as well. This is a wonderful presentation, and a must for a Navy collection. $2,295.00

 

 

 

 

 

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13-916 NAVY ZWEISPITZ TRIM FABRIC ROLL.  The zweispitz is the Navy’s version of a "dress" headdress. This is a roll of material that was used to trim the zweispitz. It appears to be made of cotton, but could be a hard silk. It has designs stitched into it. The end piece identifies it as being made in Germany. While its original use was for the zweispitz, you might discover another use for it.
The roll of material measures 4 ½" diameter. It has a great deal of material on it, so much that it would be very difficult to measure. If you cannot use it for its original reason, you might find a new purpose for it.
$125.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-986 SUMMER ENLISTED MARINE-FLIEGER-ABTEILUNG SAILOR’S MÜTZE.  This is a summer enlisted Marine-Flieger-Abteilung sailor’s mütze. Enlisted Kaiserliche Marine sailors wore two different-colored tops on their mützen during the year.  In the winter, they wore the navy blue tops that matched their dark-blue uniforms. In the summer, the sailors switched to white tops to match their white uniforms.  I am not sure why, but we see the summer white top mützen far less frequently.  Our offering today is made of heavy, white, cotton twill.  As it is white, it is more susceptible to staining and dirt.  That said, this white top does show signs of what I would call dirt and, perhaps, even a couple of oil spots.
The mütze’s center front features a Reich’s kokarde that is actually for an officer.  As you look at the mütze straight-on, you will note that it has the “saddle” effect so favored by cavalry regiments. A gold embossed cap tally attached to the mütze clearly reads “Marine-Flieger-Abteilung.” 
Inside the mütze is a high-quality, light-brown leather sweatband. The mütze does not have  a liner, so the cotton twill material appears on both the cap’s inside and outside.  It is a privately-purchased mütze that displays NO depot markings on its interior. If you look at the interior where the kokarde is attached, it looks as though a snap button appears on a tab where the kokarde is attached.  If you look closely at that tab, you will see the printed word “Kiel,” where one of the High Seas Fleet’s two major ports was based. the interior also displays the mütze's size, 56, in red.

 

 

 

 

It is a  high-quality mütze from one of the most elite units in the Imperial German Navy. $1,095.00

 

 

 

 

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13-1035 MÜTZE - ENLISTED SAILOR - S.M.S. THUERINGEN. This is a high-quality, beautifully-conditioned, privately-purchased enlisted sailor’s mütze from the S.M.S. Thueringen. It was a Schlachtschiff (Battleship) that was launched in 1909, then commissioned after sea trials during 1911. She was one of the Heligoland Class’s four ships. The other three vessels were the class leader, S.M.S. Heligoland, the S.M.S. Oldenburg, and S.M.S. Ostfriesland. [The S.M.S. Ostfriesland has a place in history, since it later was tuned over to the American Army. It was used by General Billy Mitchell to prove that bombers could sink a large Navy ship]. At the outbreak of WW I, these ships formed Battleship Squadron Nr 1 of the Hochseeflotte (High Seas Fleet).

 

During the war, the S.M.S. Thueringen saw action in both the North Sea and the Baltic. She had her classmates served at the Battle of Jutland (Skageraak) on 31 May 1916. The Thueringen was undamaged during the battle and aided in sinking more than one British ship (including the H.M.S. Black Prince). After the war, she was not one of the ships that had to be turned over to the British at Scapa Flow since she was an older, NOT technologically advanced vessel. She was instead turned over to the French in 1920, used as a target ship, then eventually scrapped.
The mütze was privately-purchased, not depot-issued by the German Navy. The cap is dark-blue, which was considered the Winter issue. White was worn during the Summer months. An officer-style Reich’s kokarde is attached in the mütze’s center. A silver S.M.S. Thueringen cap tally is attached to the mütze. [PLEASE NOTE: We have referred to the ship as the S.M.S. Thueringen. It was actually the S.M.S. Thüringen, but the "ue" is used on the cap tally].

 

Have you ever wondered why some cap tallies are gold and others are silver? For those sailors who served aboard a ship, gold cap tallies were used by sailors assigned as seamen "upper deck" duty. Silver was used for the "lower deck" seamen who worked the technical stations (engines, work divisions, etc.) aboard ship. So our sailor was a "below decks" man. The tally is in beautiful condition and is attached very securely to the mütze. Inside the mütze is a well-conditioned leather sweatband. The black silk liner is in excellent condition. This sailor enjoyed a top-quality mütze, and so, preferred to buy his own headdress rather than accept one from the naval depot. $650.00 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-1006 XLL IMPERIAL GERMAN NAVY OFFICER’S CAP BADGE. This is a consignment item. It is a cap badge that was displayed in the front center of a naval officer’s Schirmmütze. It measures 2 ¾ x 3." The badge is made of fine gold bullion, including the Hohenzollern Crown that was emblematic of the crowns seen on all naval items. The bullion extends to the laurel leaves that encircle the badge’s kokarde. These varied according to officer’s duties. This particular variety is for an officer who served aboard a Kaiserliche Marine ship.
Its kokarde is gold bullion with a red center, indicating the Reich rather than a particular State. It sports a different type of cloth as its backing on the reverse. The obverse’s bullion displays a wonderful patina that just shouts that it is one-hundred-plus years-old. The patina and its honest wear assure us that this is the real deal.
It is a marvelous example of these hard-to-find cap badges. $695.00 2nd PRICE REDUCTION: $500.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-617 NAVY OFFICER'S VISOR CAP BADGE - KAISERLICHE MARINE. This is an officer’s visor cap badge from the Kaiserliche Marine. The badge is made of fine gold, silver, and black bullion. It reveals honest age, yet remains in good, solid condition. It has been worn on, and removed from, a visor cap. $695.00

 

 

 

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20-279 KAISERLICHER YACHT CLUB BADGE. This is a cap badge for the Kaiserlicher Yacht Club. The club, which was formed by Kaiser Wilhelm II, was Imperial Germany’s most exclusive yacht club. Wilhelm II served as the Commodore. The most famous names in Germany were members: royals, nobles, and naval officers. Most royal family members belonged. Even men like Felix Graf von Luckner were members. The multicolored bullion badge is oval-shaped and measures 2 1/4" x 1 3/8." The club’s pennant is in the center, with "KYC" under it. The obverse is in near mint condition. The reverse, which is covered with black leather material, shows just enough age to confirm that it really is 100+ years-old. This is a slightly different variation of the example of a cap badge from the Kaiserlicher Yacht Club above. Buy both and receive a handsome discount. $450.00

 

 

 

 

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13-876 GROßADMIRAL ALFRED von TIRPITZ’S SINGLE SHOULDER BOARD AND POSTCARD. Alfred von Tirpitz (1849-1930) was one of the Kaiserliche Marine’s best known admiräle (admirals). He joined the Navy in 1865. At that time the Prussian Navy was very small and insignificant. [When the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian War took place, the Prussian Navy was far outnumbered by the French Navy. The Prussians stayed in port during the conflict, (engendering embarrassment for their lack of participation)]. Early in his career, Tirpitz was involved in the development of torpedoes, then Torpedo-Boote. He held a number of administrative and tactical commands. In 1895, he was promoted to the rank of Konteradmiral. In 1899, he was promoted to Vizeadmiral. The following year he was ennobled. In 1903, he was promoted to the rank of Admiral. His final promotion was to Großadmiral, which took place in 1911. (We will return to that later). In the late 1890's, he became more involved in the Kaiserliche Marine’s political/administrative arm. From 1897-1916, he served as the "Secretary of State of the Imperial German Naval Office." Von Tirpitz was responsible for the Navy’s growth. With the Kaiser’s support, the Navy greatly increased its numbers of battleships and cruisers. This led to an arms race with England, with each country enlarging its Navy in competition with its rival.
Von Tirpitz also was responsible for building a fleet of U-Boote, as he felt that they would be very effective against England’s bigger ships (particularly those on duty in the eventual blockade that von Tirpitz realized was inevitable). He also knew submarines would help prevent cargo ships from delivering much needed war materials and food to England. [Interestingly, submarine warfare proved a major problem for Germany. Views about "unrestricted" submarine attacks on civilian targets raged pro and con within the Navy, as well as within the Kaiser’s circle, and those of other political/diplomatic entities. Germany’s unrestricted submarine warfare eventually became a prime motivator for the USA’s involvement in WW I].
By 1916, Kaiser Wilhelm withdrew his support for von Tirpitz (a handy scapegoat), forcing him to retire the same year. In 1917, von Tirpitz became involved in a new political party, eventually serving in the Reichstag during the 1920's. Von Tirpitz remained an important figure within Germany’s military and public life until the late 1920's. With the rise to party of the Nazi Party (NSDAP), a rebuilt German Luftwaffe (Air Force) and Kriegsmarine (Navy) came into existence. The Kriegsmarine built two modern Bismarck Class Battleships: the famous Bismarck was its lead ship, the Tirpitz was the second. The Bismarck was sunk in May 1941. Bottled up in Norwegian waters, the Tirpitz was not much of a major factor. Ultimately, bombers from the RAF sank her in November 1944.
To truly comprehend von Tirpitz’s importance, one first must understand the rank of Großadmiral. It was instituted by the Kaiserliche Marine in 1901. Prior to that date, the highest rank was Admiral, which was equal to the German Army’s General der Infanterie. As it was the top rank, the Navy had NO rank equivalent to the Army’s ranks of Generaloberst or Generalfeldmarschall. When the Großadmiral’s rank was instituted, it became equivalent to the Army’s rank of Generalfeldmarschall, (the Army’s Generaloberst rank still had NO equivalent).
Only SIX men became Großadmiräle (plural form) from the rank’s 1901 institution through the empire’s end in 1918. The first two, Kaiser Wilhelm II (1901) and Sweden’s King Oscar II (1901), were royals who held the rank on an honorary basis. The next two men, Hans von Koester (1905) and Prussia’s Prince Heinrich (1909), held the rank on a tactical basis. The final two men, Alfred von Tirpitz (1911)[held without patent] and Henning von Holtzendorff (1918), held the rank as the "Secretary of State of the Imperial German Naval Office," the Navy’s TOP official.
You will note the phrase "held without patent" after Alfred von Tirpitz’s name. When he received his promotion on 27 January 1911, he was given the title Großadmiral, BUT did not receive its patent. The lack of that document signifies that von Tirpitz’s rank actually was LOWER than the other five Großadmiräle. The difference becomes evident when we study von Tirpitz’s shoulder boards. The other five Großadmiräle’s shoulder boards sported crossed batons like those of the Generalfeldmarschälle (GFM), while von Tirpitz displayed four pips on his. [Those of you familiar with the German Army’s shoulder boards know that officers who received a patent with their rank wore the crossed batons. Those officers who were designated Generaloberst in the rank of Generalfeldmarschall (an honorary rank generally given to royals WITHOUT direct command authority) sported shoulder boards with the crossed batons AND three pips (combining a Generalfeldmarschall’s crossed batons with a Generaloberst’s three pips), or displayed four pips by themselves]. This was exactly von Tirpitz’s situation. Unlike the other five men, he bore four pips on his shoulder boards and epaulettes.
Several years ago we offered a single von Tirpitz shoulder board with the same configuration. It came from a museum in Germany, and I was very excited to offer it. Today, we are offering ANOTHER single shoulder board that only could have belonged to Alfred von Tirpitz. The shoulder board measures 1 7/8" x 4 3/16." It displays four gilt-toned pips on its obverse. Its reverse reveals that it is of the slip-on variety, which is correct. Its backing material boasts a rich, 100% correct, navy-blue color that is proper for a naval officer’s shoulder boards. We can also see where each pip has been attached.
In addition we are offering a postcard which shows von Tirpitz in uniform. If you look closely at the shoulder board that he is wearing on his left shoulder, you will note that it has FOUR pips and not crossed batons. This confirms that von Tirpitz was the only man to have the rank of Großadmiral and to wear a shoulder board with FOUR pips.
The shoulder board’s condition is excellent, overall. Interestingly, this shoulder board’s addition means we currently are offering items from THREE of the six Großadmiräle! Only Kaiser Wilhelm II, Prinz Heinrich, and Sweden’s King Oscar II are not currently represented in our inventory. $2,995.00
 

 

 

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13-454 KAISERLICHE MARINE OBERLEUTNANT zur SEE'S EPAULETTES IN ORIGINAL STORAGE BOX. Shoulder boards and epaulettes from the Kaiserliche Marine are very hard-to-find. The dress epaulettes or "banjo" shoulder boards are even more so. Add to the mix a pair of epaulettes  that come in their original storage box and you have a very rare example of an epaulette! The examples we are offering today are for an Oberleutnant zur See. An Oberleutnant zur See is equivalent to an Oberleutnant in the German Army, a 1st Lieutenant in the U.S. Army, or a Lieutenant in the U.S. Navy. These epaulettes are massive. They display a combination of gold and silver embroidered bullion on the obverse. Each displays a fouled anchor highlighted in the center of a gold field. The anchors have a marvelous patina to them and are quite striking. Each epaulette has the individual fringe-like gold bullion hanging down. Also each epaulette exhibits a gilt button for the Kaiserliche Marine, with anchor and crown. Underneath, the epaulettes have a dark-blue or purple lining, along with the brass attachments that clip them to the tunic. The deluxe storage box is made of black leatherette. Inside is a pedestal on which the epaulettes are tied and mounted. Also, a pillow is cut to the shape of the box and laid over the epaulettes to protect them from any damage. This is a truly stunning pair of epaulettes. $1,250.00 

 

 

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23-283 PAIR OF EPAULETTES FOR AN OBERSTABSINGENIEUR - KAISERLICHE MARINE. This is a first-rate pair of naval epaulettes. They are for an officer who held the rank of Oberstabsingenieur (staff engineering officer). Each has a black velvet surface on which the engineering officer’s gilt device (an anchor and gear) appears. Flanking the engineering device are two gilt pips. Extending down the sides are a magnificent set of gilt bullion ringlets. Silver bullion tape also extends around each epaulette’s tongue. The epaulette’s end is graced by a small gilt Navy button. Underneath each epaulette we see black velvet and leather holding the brass device that attaches the epaulette to the uniform. These epaulettes are in VERY fine condition! $795.00

 

 

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13-561 SINGLE EPAULETTE FOR A KAPITÄNLEUTNANT IN CHARGE OF STORES ABOARD A NAVAL VESSEL. This is a very rare variation of a single dress (banjo style) epaulette for a Kapitänleutnant who was in charge of all stores aboard a ship. This is indicated by the silver button on the epaulette that attached it to the dress uniform. The epaulette has silver bullion trim. The fringe (ringlets) extending from the board is also silver. In the epaulette's center is a massive gilt insignia for the Kaiserliche Marine, featuring a Hohenzollern Eagle over crossed anchors. The device is flanked by two gold pips proclaiming the Kapitänleutnant’s rank. This rank was equivalent to a Hauptmann in the German Army. It was also equivalent to a Captain in the U.S. Army or a full Lieutenant in the U. S. Navy. It is a very fine epaulette in top condition. $550.00  

 

 

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13-771 SINGLE SHOULDER BOARD - LEUTNANT zur SEE. This is a single Leutnant zur See’s shoulder board. The rank was equal to a German Army Leutnant (2nd Lieutenant in the U.S. Army or Air Force, and Lieutenant JG [Junior Grade] in the U.S. Navy). The shoulder board has been removed from a tunic, and is of the sewn-in variety. Its backing is purple velvet. It measures 4 1/2" X 1 1/4". Overall, it is in very good condition. $95.00

 

 

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23-447 XLL NAVAL SEEBATAILLON LEUTNANT’S SHOULDER BOARDS. This is a consignment item. The Seebataillon was Imperial Germany’s version of the USA’s Marine Corps. Its members filled a number of roles: serving aboard large naval vessels, providing security at German embassies in foreign countries, etc. (e.g., the entire Seebataillon Nr III was based in China to oversee Germany’s colonial interests). These shoulder boards are of the sewn-in variety and measure 1" x 4." Each displays a large Hohenzollern Crown on its obverse. Half-black/half-red-and-white chevrons are interwoven into the boards’ silver bullion, indicating the Seebataillon’s status as a national entity (rather than coming from a particular state or kingdom). The reverse sports a white fabric backing.
The shoulder boards are in excellent condition. $1,050.00 PRICE REDUCTION: $945.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-812 REICHSMARINE OFFICER - BROCADE BELT - BUCKLE - PHOTOGRAPH. This is a brocade belt and buckle for a Reichsmarine officer. The Reichsmarine was Germany’s Navy from the monarchy’s fall in 1918 until 1935, when the Third Reich’s Kriegsmarine replaced it. The Reichsmarine was severely limited to 15,000 men by the Treaty of Versailles, as were the number and size of the ships that Germany could use. The belt is classic brocade, with twin gray lines against a silver bullion background. The bullion’s toning is quite handsome. The belt buckle measures 2 ½" x 2 1/4," and displays a superb gilt finish. It features a fouled anchor as did that of the Kaiserliche Marine, but has no Kaiser Crown. The keeps are present, and the belt is 100% complete. The belt itself measures 43" x 1 7/8." Its overall condition is excellent. A 5 3/8" x 3 ½"photo of a Reichsmarine officer wearing a similar belt (I cannot say with certainty that the belt shown in the photograph is in fact the belt that we offer today.) accompanies the belt. $350.00  

 

 

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13-834 REICHSMARINE OFFICER - BROCADE BELT - BUCKLE. This is a brocade belt and buckle for a Reichsmarine officer. The Reichsmarine was Germany’s Navy from the monarchy’s fall in 1918 until 1935, when the Third Reich’s Kriegsmarine replaced it. The Reichsmarine was severely limited to 15,000 men by the Treaty of Versailles, as was the number and size of the ships that Germany could use. The belt is classic brocade, with twin gray lines against a silver bullion background. The bullion’s toning is quite splendid. The belt buckle measures 2 ½" x 2 1/4," and displays a superb gilt finish. It features a fouled anchor (as did the Kaiserliche Marine), but has no Kaiser Crown. The keeps are present, and the belt is 100% complete. The belt itself measures 33." Its overall condition is excellent. $325.00
 

 

 

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13-840 DAILY DUTY NAVY JUNIOR OFFICER’S BELT - BUCKLE AND SWORD HANGERS. This is a non dress belt and buckle that would have been worn by a junior naval officer. It is a complete "rig" to which one could add a Navy dagger with hangers. It could be displayed in that manner, or perhaps on a naval officer’s tunic. The belt measures 38" in length, overall. Attached to the belt are two lionshead hangers (similar to those on the hangers that actually attach to the Navy dagger). They measure 1 1/4" in diameter. Attached to the belt is a smaller buckle, measuring 1½" in diameter. $795.00

 

 

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13-841 DAILY DUTY NAVY OFFICER’S BELT AND BUCKLE. This is a very fine example of a naval officer’s daily-wear belt and buckle, measuring 38 ½" in length. A larger-sized Navy buckle, measuring 2" in diameter, is attached. We see the daily-wear belt and buckle far less often than we do the dress brocade belt and buckle. This is a rare opportunity to acquire one. $650.00

 

 

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Veteran's Steins, Glassware, Canteens etc.

 

18-352 DELUXE KRIEGSFLAGGE SCHNAPPS GLASSES AND DECANTER AND SERVING TRAY SET. This is a wonderful set of seven pieces that sport a kriegsflagge motif. Five small glasses are included, which could have been used for schnapps or some other liqueur. They resemble Pilsner beer glasses in miniature. They measure 3 ½" tall, 1 3/8" in diameter at the top and 1 1/4" in diameter at the base. Gold trim bands encircle their brims. Each glass displays a full-color kriegsflagge on its side (flown by the German military during wartime). Commonly seen on the Kaiserliche Marine’s ships, each kriegsflagge is rendered complete with its attached flagpole. I especially like the glasses’ bottoms. They are quite heavy. One can even see the bubbles in the base.
The single-handled carafe is the set’s centerpiece, and comes complete with a splendid stopper. It stands 10 3/4" tall and measures 3 1/8" in diameter at its base. The crystalline glass stopper displays tiny bubbles from its production. A wide, gold trim band encircles the carafe’s mouth. A similar wide gold trim band appears further down the carafe’s neck, flanked by two smaller gold trim bands above and below it. Some of the gold has worn off these trim bands. The kriegsflagge motif is repeated on the carafe’s front (naturally in a much larger size than those on the five glasses [!]).
The final piece of this gracefully exquisite set is a handsome tray upon which the five glasses and carafe are displayed. The clear glass tray measures 7 1/8" in diameter, and exhibits a single gold trim band around its edge. The tray’s simplicity causes the pieces’ kriegsflaggen to "pop" out.
The truly elegant set effectively shows the lengths patriotic Germans traveled to demonstrate their love of country and Kaiser. This magnificent group will totally transform any area in which you care to display it. It displays especially well under light.
$1,295.00

 

 

 

 

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13-525 NAVY RESERVIST KRUG - S.M.S. ROON. This is a very tall example of a reservist’s krug from the S.M.S. Roon. The S.M.S. Roon was a Heavy Cruiser, the lead Cruiser of the Roon Class Cruisers. It was commissioned in 1906, served during WW I, and scrapped in 1921. The owner of this krug was a Reservist named "Olkiewicz." He served in Kiel from 1907 to 1910 as part of the 1. Werft.-Division 2nd Kompagnie. The krug does not have a metal top, and never did. That is partly why it is larger than a conventional stein with top. The center panel’s main theme shows two sailors, one with a Mauser. Steaming between them and toward the viewer is a German ship.
A kriegsflagge is also present. All of this is in high relief! On either side of the central panel are further panels with a view of the S.M.S. Roon, and men from the work division shoveling coal into the boilers. On these two panels are the names of this man’s shipmates. The krug’s handle features another high-relief sailor. This is a one Litre krug that stands 9" tall. The diameter at the rim is 3," and the diameter at the base is 4 ½."
This krug is in excellent condition, with vibrant colors and no problems whatsoever.
$1,295.00
 

 

 

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13-962 OVAL-SHAPED PLATE COMMEMORATING S. M. S. EMDEN. This is an amazing oval plate that commemorates Germany’s earliest heroic ship of the Great War, the S. M. S. Emden. The S. M. S. Emden was the final vessel from the two-ship class headed by the S. M. S. Dresden. Both ships were Kleiner (Small) Kreuzers in the Kaiserliche Marine. The Emden was officially placed into service in 1909. She spent much of her career attached to the East Asia Squadron, which was based at Tsingtao in China and commanded by Vizeadmiral Maximilian Graf von Spee.  She received a new commander, Karl von Mueller (1873-1921), in Spring, 1913. He was a young officer who had risen through the ranks and caught the attention of both Großadmiral Prinz Henry of Prussia and Großadmiral Alfred von Tirpitz, after serving on their respective staffs. In fact, von Tirpitz sent von Mueller to his new post and command.
When WWI broke out, most of the East Asia Squadron was at sea. The Emden was at port, but immediately departed. Once at sea, she was the first German warship of WW I to capture an enemy ship -- a Russian steamer. She then received notification from Squadron Commander von Spee to rendezvous with the rest of the squadron. Von Mueller suggested that one of the small cruisers be detached and assigned to the Indian Ocean to raid on Allied shipping. Von Spee agreed. As the Emden was the newest, fastest, and best suited for the task, she was chosen. Graf von Spee and the balance of the East Asian Squadron sailed East across the Pacific to meet their fate at the Battle of the Falkland Islands in December 1914. The Graf and his two young sons, who sailed under his command, perished in the South Atlantic along with the bulk of the East Asia Squadron’s sailors and ships.
Once the Emden was released under her own responsibility she proved quite successful, sinking nearly two dozen enemy ships including a Russian cruiser and a French Destroyer at late-October 1914's Battle of Penang. The Emden’s luck finally ran out on 9 November 1914. She faced the Australian cruiser HAMS Sydney off the Cocos Islands. The Emden was grounded after a sharp action. She suffered great loss of life, but von Mueller survived. Part of his crew, under the 1st officer’s command, had been ashore during the battle, and afterwards made their way back to Germany. Von Mueller was declared a national hero in Germany. Due to failing health, he was returned to Germany where he was awarded the Orden Pour le Mérite. He was also promoted to his final rank of Kapitän zur See. He died in 1921 at the age of forty-nine.
Such was the S. M. S. Emden’s history. Our commemorative plate is oval-shaped and measures 6 ½" x 9 ½." When you first look at the plate, it almost looks like a serving platter but such is not the case. The view of the Emden is in color. It shows the proud ship steaming towards you in a three-quarter view. The ship is cutting through light seas. Smoke is billowing out of all three of her stacks. The sky is blue with low-level white clouds. On the water directly below the Emden in black script is the caption
"S. M. Kl. Kreuzer "Emden" 1914." A built-in wire hanger appears on the top of the oval plate’s reverse for mounting on the wall. Also appearing on the reverse are the items listed below.

"M & O" crowned (the manufacturer’s hallmark)
"P"
(under the wire hanger)

"3638/1"
"904"
"G.G." (Ges. Gesch.)

Finally, a simple typewritten white tag features the plate artist’s name and birth and death years, "Kaiser. Marinemaler Fritz Stoltenberg 1855-1921." The condition and quality of this plate are astounding. It will make an excellent addition to your Navy collection. $1,095.00

 

 

 

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13-770 MEISSEN PLATE - OTTO WEDDIGEN - U-9. I have sought one of the plates honoring Otto Weddigen and the U-9's intrepid crew for years. I never found one that met my stringent standards and was worthy to offer you. Finally, I discovered this fine plate, manufactured by the noteworthy manufacturer, Meissen. The U-9 was a small, prewar U-Boot that burned kerosene (!) as its power source. During September 1914, the tiny U-9, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Weddigen, made history in a single hour. She sank three British cruisers within sixty minutes! Kaiser Wilhelm II was so delighted, he awarded Weddigen the 1914 Iron Crosses 1st and 2nd Class, and presented the Iron Cross 2nd Class to all the U-9's other officers and crewmen. A month later, the U-9 sank yet another British cruiser, at which time Weddigen was invested with the Knight’s Cross with Swords of the Hohenzollern House Order and the Orden Pour le Mérite. Scarcely six months later, Weddigen and the U-29's crew (his new assignment) were killed when a British battleship rammed them. Weddigen became a German national hero, since he was the first naval officer awarded the PLM. While later U-Boot commanders far exceeded Weddigen’s total amount of ships and tonnage sunk, no one was more famous or more revered by the German people. He was a superstar who, like Manfred von Richthofen, was asked for his autograph wherever he went.
The plate we are offering today measures 10" in diameter. Depicted in blue on white, the U-9 sails across a rough ocean’s surface. One solitary man, clearly Weddigen, stands in the conning tower. The kriegsflagge streams out high atop the tower. Another U-Boot is steaming along in the background. The plate’s bottom reads "U9." The plate’s exterior condition is absolutely stunning. Its reverse boasts Meissen’s emblematic crossed swords. Two small holes have been drilled in the plate’s ridge, which allows the placement of string or wire by which it can be hung on a wall. The choice remains open to the plate’s future owner. This is a fantastic tribute to Germany’s most famous WW I U-Boot commander.
These plates are very scarce today. I have never seen a better example.
$1,995.00

 

 

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13-720 VETERAN'S CANTEEN/FLASK - S.M.S. BRAUNSCHWEIG. Today we are offering a veteran’s flask/canteen from the Kaiserliche Marine. The veteran’s canteen/flask was one of a variety of items a veteran might acquire to commemorate his military service. Perhaps the most common item was a stein, but we also see veterans’ pipes, boxes, etc. The Kaiserliche Marine was always a much smaller branch of the German military than the Army. Veterans’ items like this are always sought-after and prized by collectors. Our offering today is an unusual sailor’s flask from aboard the WW I battleship S.M.S. Braunschweig. The central part is a brilliant white porcelain flask. It is framed by a silver-toned holder. The flask’s obverse displays a Hohenzollern Crown, with a fouled anchor. The flask’s strap is interwoven with blue and yellow, which are Braunschweig’s state colors. This is a very fine piece. It certainly will be of interest to you naval collectors. $725.00

 

 

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13-261 NAVY VETERAN FLASK. Veteran’s items are always popular, and they are varied, to say the least. In the Army, the more common pieces are steins, canteens, and pipes. Each of these commemorates the veteran’s service, generally the two years of compulsive service that all German men were expected to do in their late teens or early 20's. In the Navy, the more popular pieces were various drinking vessels, including steins, flasks, and canteens. Today we offer a very unusual flask for a navy veteran. The flask is actually a glass bottle covered with leather. It has a black and white cord by which the man could have hung the flask around his neck. On one side of the leather flask we see a gilt-toned Hohenzollern Crown (complete with stole) over an anchor with crossed paddles. Just below the anchor is the legend: "1. Werft (Work) Division Kiel." The latter is embossed in silver on the black leather. Some small loss of leather shows over the word Werft, but its meaning is clear. The flask's reverse side reveals some patriotic phrases regarding his service. A heart-shaped cutout allows you to look into the glass flask to see the sailor’s sweetheart (much the same as on a veteran’s stein). A lithopane allows the viewer to hold the stein up to the light and see a sweetheart as well. The top of the flask has a removable jigger. This exposes a screw top that allowed the veteran to access his beverage of choice. Navy items like this are difficult-to-find.  It would make a wonderful addition to a Navy collection. $450.00

 

 

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13-375 NAVY VETERAN'S STEIN. Veterans' steins are always very popular with collectors. Some of the very elaborate Navy steins can often sell for more than $2,000. When I say elaborate, I mean those that were painted individually for the owner, showing the unit or ship on which he served along with a list of his comrades. This example stands 8" tall. It is 2 3/4" in diameter at the lid and 3 ½" in diameter at the base. The stein is multicolored, with a primarily white and navy-blue color scheme. We see two sailors holding Mausers in the front. Immediately behind them is the conning tower of a U-Boot from which a kriegsflagge is flying. Flanking either sailor are flags, one of which is easily identified as a kriegsflagge. On the opposite side we can see the turret of a warship with two cannons extending outward. On either side of the turret are two 1914 Iron Crosses. The lid of the stein is flat and made of pewter. It depicts the port at Wilhelmshaven with ships at the piers. The stein is very well made and in excellent condition. If you are looking for a stein, this one is a real bargain for a Navy example. It is even more cost-effective than some of the Army steins that we see. $525.00.

 

 

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Documents - Paintings - Lithographs - etc.

 

 

13-988 ENLISTED KAISERLICHE MARINE SAILOR’S PROMOTION PATENT. This is an interesting promotion patent for an enlisted Kaiserliche Marine sailor. He was promoted to a Machinist 2nd Class effective 23 December 1918, some six weeks after WW I ended! The handwritten document measures 8 ¼" x 11 ¼," and was issued to a man whose last name was Rettick. It shows he served aboard Torpedo Boots S 247 and S 210. The promotion was actually approved prior to 11 November 1918, but apparently took awhile to wend its way through the Kaiserliche Marine’s bureaucracy. $75.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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31-93 TWO KAISERLICHE MARINE DOCTOR'S PATENTS - ONE SIGNED BY KAISER WILHELM II. We are always pleased to offer you patents (two) for one officer, particularly a naval officer. They are for a medical doctor named Wilhelm Haltermann. The two documents are described below.

1). Dr. Haltermann was promoted to Marine-Ober-Assistenzarzt on 27 March 1909. The document was prepared at the Neues Palais. The document measures 8 ½" x 14" when closed, and 17" x 14" when opened. It is set up with four pages, although only two are used. Its second page features a large embossed Hohenzollern Eagle.

2). The second document is set up in a similar fashion. In this document we see that Dr. Haltermann was promoted to Marine-Stabsarzt in 1912. Again, the embossed Hohenzollern Eagle appears. This promotion, however, features Kaiser Wilhelm II’s large and bold signature. At this time we do not know what service, if any, that Dr. Haltermann had during and after WW I. Any additional information about him would be greatly appreciated from our audience.

It is a fine pair of documents. As they are to a naval doctor, we can be assured that they are scarce. $895.00  

 

 

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19-208 NAVAL OFFICER’S PROMOTION PATENT WITH KAISER WILHELM II’S SIGNATURE. This is a very interesting naval officer’s promotion patent. The recipient’s name was Oskar Röcher. He was promoted to Kapitänleutnant on 12 November 1904. Prior to WW I, Kaiser Wilhelm II personally signed promotion patents only when the rank reached that of Hauptmann or Kapitänleutnant. The document measures 14 1/4" x 8 ½" when unopened, and 14 1/4" x 17" when opened. The second page bears Kaiser Wilhelm II’s bold signature in black ink, and an embossed seal with the Hohenzollern Eagle.
A patent like this is very difficult-to-find, as the Kaiserliche Marine was far smaller than the German Army (thus involving far fewer officers). Further research on Röcher shows that he received the very rare Colonial Medal with Clasp for service in Venezuela during 1902/1903. He served on several ships during World War I, including the S. M. S. Großer Kurfürst, the S. M. S. München, and the S. M. S. Freya. He retired in 1919 as a Kapitän zur See a.D.
$450.00 

 

 

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13-900 U-BOOT UC-23'S COMBAT PATROL REPORT - OBERLEUTNANT zur SEE JOHANNES KIRSCHNER COMMANDING. This is a combat patrol report for the UC-23 under Oberleutnant zur See Johannes Kirchner’s command. The Kaiserliche Marine operated several U-Boot classes and types. One of its smaller classes was the "UC," which featured coastal boats that also laid mines in designated areas. The UC-23 was commissioned in July 1916, assigned to the Constantinople Flotilla to operate primarily in the Mediterranean. Her first commander was Oberleutnant zur See Johannes Kirschner. He was an early U-Boot commander who also served on the UC 13 and UC 48 (his final command, which lasted through the war’s end). The UC 23 was responsible for sinking forty-five ships, nineteen under Kirschner’s command (July 1916-1917). [It is also worth mentioning that Kirschner received the 1914 Iron Crosses 1st and 2nd Class during his career].
Today we are offering the UC 23's interesting and very neatly typed combat patrol report from 18–24 February 1917. The cover sheet displays all the U-Boot’s basic information: its name, the time period, and so on. It also is marked by the various entities who reviewed the document, from Kirschner’s immediate superior to Berlin’s Admiralty.
It is one of the more detailed combat patrol reports that I have encountered. It has a daily report with hourly notations where needed. At the end of each day’s events, Kirschner signed it boldly in black ink. The report features six-to-seven Johannes Kirschner signatures. The daily notations mention weather conditions, conditions on board the UC 23, and sightings. I have not read it in detail, but it mentions sighting a battleship (nationality unidentified) on two different days, and a French battleship. Destroyers and Torpedoboots are also mentioned. The U 73 is mentioned, so it must have been working in the UC 23's general area. Mines being laid are also mentioned at one point. I did NOT see anything about sinking enemy vessels during this period.
Two notes were typed and added to Kirschner’s report, which I find quite unusual. It was very simple to just pencil in comments and/or remarks, but apparently the originating officer thought it important enough to type out his remarks and add them to Kirschner’s reports. The report’s last page is primarily a recap of observations made by Kirschner and his First Officer, Leutnant zur See Schaefer. The report is typed on thin onionskin-like paper, and the final page is greatly dog-eared and foxed around the edges. Its content is solid but the final page’s condition is NOT equal to the others. The
document’s format is quite large. The pages measure
X" x X."
The final piece to the report group is a map that corresponds to the UC 23's voyage. The map measures
X" x X." It shows the UC 23's departure from Monte Negro and its return at the voyage’s end. The daily travel is plotted on the map in a most precise manner. Each point was drawn neatly, using a ruler. The points where mines have been laid are also noted. It is fascinating to compare the two documents together. [It was common for U-Boot commanders to prepare maps like these. Too often they became separated from the reports following the war. The maps were popular since they could be framed. Following the war many documents from the offices of the former High Seas Fleet and the Admiralty were packed up and sent to England. [I do not know why this happened, other than curiosity about the U-Boot Service, although some authorities were interested in putting certain U-Boot commanders on trial for War Crimes. This particular report came to us from an English source].
It is a pleasure to bring you a COMPLETE combat patrol report. You will have plenty of research opportunities with it. Enjoy!
$1,095.00

 

 

 

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13-1033 KRIEGSTAGBUCH (WAR DIARY) - U-25 (UC-15). All Imperial German Navy ships’ commanders were required to submit a Kriegstagbuch (War Diary) detailing their vessels’ voyages. These were submitted up through the chain of command until they ultimately reached the offices of the Hochseeflotte (High Seas Fleet). Today we are offering just such a document for the U-25 (also known as the UC-15). The log covers the period of 21 through 26 March 1916, and was kept by Oberleutnant zur See Albrecht von Dewitz, the U-25's Commander. Von Dewitz entered the Navy as a cadet in 1908. He commanded the UC-15 from her June 1915 commissioning. [It is interesting to note that he refers to the U-Boot as U-25 (UC-15) on the Kriegstagbuch’s title page. I do not quite understand this. In checking records, he was NOT the U-25's commander, but IS listed as the UC-15's commander. Also, PLEASE NOTE: while under von Dewitz’s command, the UC-15 was pitted against the Russians in the Baltic and the Black Sea, both areas under Prinz Heinrich of Prussia’s command].
From 28 June 1915 through 20 June 1916, von Dewitz and the UC-15 sank three Russian ships, one of which was a Destroyer. After von Dewitz’s departure in June 1916, the UC-15 was commanded by Bruno Heller. The UC-15 was lost with all hands on 30 November 1916.
The Kriegstagbuch measures 13 ½ " x 8 ¼." The U-Boot’s name is typed on the title page (along with the confusing U-25/UC15 designation), as well as the patrol dates, and the commanding officer’s name and rank. Inside the Kriegstagbuch we find six neatly-typed pages that describe
the UC-15's daily activities. Included are that day’s entry times, the UC-15's course, etc. Each entry indicates that they were operating in the Black Sea. The Russian port of Sevastopol is mentioned, as well as a fellow U-Boots UB-8 and UB-7.
As it is neatly typed, you will find the document easy to follow. You can enjoy hours of digging into the specifics. As much attention as U-Boots received during WW II, WW I’s U-Boot service honed the skills of many officers who later played similar roles in WW II. These included Wilhelm Canaris (1887-1945), the naval security arm chief, Karl Dönitz (1891-1980), WW II’s first commander of the submarine arm and later commander of the entire Kriegsmarine. Following Adolf Hitler’s death, Dönitz was Germany Führer during WW II’s final days and the official who surrendered to the Allies in May 1945. $795.00 

 

 

 

 

 

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We are offering a series of four Kriegstagebücher (war diaries) for the UC 14, a small coastal U-Boot that laid mines.
It sank multiple ships during the war. Franz Becker was her 2nd commander. He commanded the sinking of 42 ships in WW I.
He won the Knight’s Cross with Swords of the Hohenzollern House Order and the 1914 Iron Crosses 1st and 2nd Class.
Available individually.      SPECIAL price for all 4.

 

 

13-854 U-BOOT UC 14 KRIEGSTAGBUCH (WAR DIARY) - OBERLEUTNANT zur SEE BAUER COMMANDING. The UC 14 was a UC I Class Boat. She was commissioned on 5 June 1915. Her career ended when she sank on 3 October 1917, after striking a mine at the Zeebrugge Harbor entrance. All hands were lost. During her career, she sank a total of fourteen Allied ships, plus two warships. Her submarine class consisted of minelayers that carried no deck guns or torpedoes. From 5 Jun. 1915 until 9 Oct. 1916, she served in the Pola Flotilla. From 11 Jan. 1917 until 3 Oct. 1917, she served in the Flandern Flotilla.
Her first commander, from 5 June 1915 through 6 January 1916, was Oberleutnant zur Zee Cäsar Bauer (1886-1916). Bauer was later killed while commanding the UB 46. He was relieved on 7 January 1916 by Oberleutnant zur See Franz Becker (1888-1980), who served through 30 June 1916. Becker later commanded other U-Boote, sinking forty-two ships and damaging five. Becker eventually won the 1914 Iron Crosses 1st and 2nd Class, and the Knight’s Cross with Swords of the Hohenzollern House Order.
Today we are offering the UC 14's Kriegstagbuch (war diary/combat patrol document) from 24 December through 28 December 1915 under Bauer’s command. The document measures 8 1/4" x 13." It consists of two-sided pages, totaling four pages of typed information, with additional pencilled comments and other information. The report consists of a daily recap of his vessel’s activities. It includes their exact position and the activities performed on that given date. It mentions mines, ship-sightings, etc.
This is a fine document listing the UC 14's activities. He was her first commander and was most likely his last patrol before he was transferred to another U-Boot.
$395.00

 

 

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13-855 U-BOOT UC 14 KRIEGSTAGBUCH (WAR DIARY) - OBERLEUTNANT zur SEE FRANZ BECKER COMMANDING. he UC 14 was a UC I Class Boat. She was commissioned on 5 June 1915. Her career ended when she sank on 3 October 1917, after striking a mine at the Zeebrugge Harbor entrance. All hands were lost. During her career, she sank a total of fourteen Allied ships, plus two warships. Her submarine class consisted of minelayers that carried no deck guns or torpedoes. From 5 Jun. 1915 until 9 Oct. 1916, she served in the Pola Flotilla. From 11 Jan. 1917 until 3 Oct. 1917, she served in the Flandern Flotilla.
Her first commander, from 5 June 1915 through 6 January 1916, was Oberleutnant zur Zee Cäsar Bauer (1886-1916). Bauer was later killed while commanding the UB 46. He was relieved on 7 January 1916 by Oberleutnant zur See Franz Becker (1888-1980), who served through 30 June 1916. Becker later commanded other U-Boote, sinking forty-two ships and damaging five. Becker eventually won the 1914 Iron Crosses 1st and 2nd Class, and the Knight’s Cross with Swords of the Hohenzollern House Order.
Today we are offering the UC 14's Kriegstagbuch (war diary/combat patrol document) from 4 April through 7 Aril 1916 under Oberleutnant zur See Franz Becker’s command. The report is typewritten, with a total of three typewritten sheets (as well as several blank pages). This is all bound together with a string. The document measures 8 1/4" x 13." The daily observations and results are noted, including daily positions, etc.
The document is well-organized, extremely neat, and displays Becker’s signature.
$495.00

 

 

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13-856 U-BOOT UC 14 KRIEGSTAGBUCH (WAR DIARY) - OBERLEUTNANT zur SEE FRANZ BECKER COMMANDING. he UC 14 was a UC I Class Boat. She was commissioned on 5 June 1915. Her career ended when she sank on 3 October 1917, after striking a mine at the Zeebrugge Harbor entrance. All hands were lost. During her career, she sank a total of fourteen Allied ships, plus two warships. Her submarine class consisted of minelayers that carried no deck guns or torpedoes. From 5 Jun. 1915 until 9 Oct. 1916, she served in the Pola Flotilla. From 11 Jan. 1917 until 3 Oct. 1917, she served in the Flandern Flotilla.
Her first commander, from 5 June 1915 through 6 January 1916, was Oberleutnant zur Zee Cäsar Bauer (1886-1916). Bauer was later killed while commanding the UB 46. He was relieved on 7 January 1916 by Oberleutnant zur See Franz Becker (1888-1980), who served through 30 June 1916. Becker later commanded other U-Boote, sinking forty-two ships and damaging five. Becker eventually won the 1914 Iron Crosses 1st and 2nd Class, and the Knight’s Cross with Swords of the Hohenzollern House Order.
Today we are offering the UC 14's Kriegstagbuch (war diary/combat patrol document) from 12 April through 20 April 1916 under Oberleutnant zur See Franz Becker’s command. The report is typewritten, with a total of five typewritten sheets (as well as one blank page). This is all bound together with a string. The document measures 8 1/4" x 13." The daily observations and results are noted, including daily positions, etc. Each daily report is signed "Becker." The last entry bears his full signature and rank. The entire document is well-organized, extremely neat, and displays Becker’s signature.
$595.00
 

 

 

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13-857 U-BOOT UC 14 KRIEGSTAGBUCH (WAR DIARY) - OBERLEUTNANT zur SEE FRANZ BECKER COMMANDING. he UC 14 was a UC I Class Boat. She was commissioned on 5 June 1915. Her career ended when she sank on 3 October 1917, after striking a mine at the Zeebrugge Harbor entrance. All hands were lost. During her career, she sank a total of fourteen Allied ships, plus two warships. Her submarine class consisted of minelayers that carried no deck guns or torpedoes. From 5 Jun. 1915 until 9 Oct. 1916, she served in the Pola Flotilla. From 11 Jan. 1917 until 3 Oct. 1917, she served in the Flandern Flotilla.
Her first commander, from 5 June 1915 through 6 January 1916, was Oberleutnant zur Zee Cäsar Bauer (1886-1916). Bauer was later killed while commanding the UB 46. He was relieved on 7 January 1916 by Oberleutnant zur See Franz Becker (1888-1980), who served through 30 June 1916. Becker later commanded other U-Boote, sinking forty-two ships and damaging five. Becker eventually won the 1914 Iron Crosses 1st and 2nd Class, and the Knight’s Cross with Swords of the Hohenzollern House Order.
Today we are offering the UC 14's Kriegstagbuch (war diary/combat patrol document) from 18 June through 24 June 1916 under Oberleutnant zur See Franz Becker’s command. The report is typewritten, with a total of three typewritten sheets (as well as one blank page). The document measures 8 1/4" x 13." The daily observations and results are noted which includes daily positions, etc. Each daily report is signed "Becker." The last entry bears his full signature and rank. The document is well-organized, extremely neat, and displays Becker’s signature.
A map drawn by Becker that shows his U-Boot’s course is also included and measures 11 1/4" x 11 ½." This is s a very important document grouping.
$695.00

 

 

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13-727 KRIEGSTAGBUCH - TORPEDOBOOTE. This is a Kriegstagbuch (daily war book) for a squadron of TorpedoBoote. The log covers the period of 1-12 May 1918. The commander (Kommodore) of the squadron was Kapitän zur See Heinrich. The document measures 13" x 8 1/4." It has nine pages. The log carries a day-by-day (and by hour, where necessary) account of the squadron’s activities. It was often spilt up into "half-flotillas." At the end of the report, which is marked "Secret," Heinrich has signed his name in pencil. It is a very interesting report and great for research. $450.00

 

 

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13-728 KRIEGSTAGBUCH - TORPEDOBOOTE. This is a Kriegstagbuch (daily war book) for a squadron of TorpedoBoote. The log covers the period of 13-27 May 1918 and 28-31 May. The commander (Kommodore) of the squadron was Kapitän zur See Heinrich, for the period 13-27 May. For the period of 28-31 May, it was a Kapitän zur See Madlung. The document measures 13" x 8 1/4." It has thirteen pages. The log carries a day-by-day (and by hour, where necessary) account of the squadron’s activities. It was often spilt up into "half-flotillas." At the end of the report, which is marked "Secret," Madlung has signed his name in pencil. It is a very interesting report and great for research. $495.00

 

 

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13-709 TWO TORPEDOBOOT WAR DIARIES. In the past we have been very pleased to offer U-Boot Kriegstagebücher (War Diaries), and on occasion from other vessels. Today we are offering you a pair of War Diaries and related documents from a Torpedoboot. Essentially, the documents were a report of a particular boat’s events on a voyage. They were written by the vessel’s captain, then submitted up through channels to the Admiralty in Berlin for final review. A captain probably kept a personal log as well, but these were more professional and orderly, since they were intended for other people’s eyes. They included a day-by-day accounting of the voyage, any special events that occurred, along with any combat that took place.
The first report covers the period of 1-10 May 1918, and is for Torpedoboot 152, which operated in the Baltic. The document, which measures 13" x 8," contains 27 pages that are stapled together. It is a daily report of actions and observations. Most of the entries are signed by Torpedoboot 152's commanding officer. The last page is signed by the Konteradmiral, who commanded this and other vessels in the area. The captain mentions seeing other German vessels, including the S. M. S. Westfalen, and the S.M.S. Posen. The entries are varied. You will find them most interesting.
The second Kriegstägbuch covers the period of 21-31 May 1918 for Torpedoboot 155. This document has twelve pages, and is again signed by the area’s Konteradmiral. Nine other pages of loose documents are included. All are housed in a modern, paper, file folder. You will find a great deal to read and perhaps even research.
$1,850.00

 

 

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13-1034 WW I U-BOOT INFORMATION FILE - U-BOOT BLUEPRINTS INCLUDED. U-Boot collectors will find this file on WW I German U-Boots VERY interesting. The first portion of the file contains an original listing of the Great War’s U-Boots. The article, first published in 1919, was titled "Schiffbau" (Ship Building). The latter lists many of the Kaiserliche Marine’s U-Boots during the war. Those listed include many of their technical details, such as dimensions, etc., as well as whether or not they survived the war. The article goes on to describe the U-Boots’ electric motors and electrical systems. It contains lots of sketches and drawings that describe the U-Boots’ propulsion systems when submerged.
In addition to the "Schiffbau" article, the file features many photostats made from original sources (these are NOT modern day copies,
but from that period or perhaps a bit later). [The first photostat machines were introduced in the USA during the early 20th Century, so it is VERY possible these photostats here come from 1919 to 1930. They are quite different, to say the least]. Some are reverse images.
The source information is very detailed and technical in nature. If you have ever wanted to "dig under the skin" of the Great War’s U-Boots, this fascinating file is perfect. I estimate that the file contains between 60 to 75 pages of information. The last few pages that I glanced through even contained a little information about the U.S. Navy! $150.00    pmNov17

 

 

 

 

 

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13-923 POSTCARD OR ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH ALBUM FROM LINIENSCHIFF S.M.S. ELASS. This is an interesting postcard or original photograph album from the Battleship S.M.S. Elass. The S. M. S. Elass was a part of the five-ship Braunschweig Battleship Class (Linienschiffe). She was commissioned in 1904. By the time WW I began, she was considered obsolete. She was assigned to the Baltic fleet under Prinz Heinrich’s command. The S.M.S. Elass participated in a couple of minor engagements with Russian ships, was used for coastal defense, and finally was anchored at Kiel, where she was used as a floating barracks. She was scrapped in 1936.
The album has a pebbled exterior and measures 16 ½" x 11" x 1 1/4," Embossed on the front cover is a shield with the S.M.S. Elass’s Coat-of-Arms. [Elass is the German word for Alsace, part of the Alsace-Lorraine territory along the French and German borders, with both French and German-speaking citizens. It was seized by Germany during the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian War, and returned to France in 1919 as a result of the Treaty of Versailles]. Along with its Coat-of-Arms, the album is imprinted in gold with "Linienschiff Elass."
The album is massive, with a total of thirty-five double pages. Each page has the capability of housing eight postcards or postcard-sized photographs. The album can accommodate a total of two hundred-eighty (280) photographs/postcards. Each page is shielded by a protective glassine sheet. The inside back cover sports a tag for the Wilhelmshaven shop where it was purchased.
The album is in excellent condition, overall. It is a unique artifact from the Kaiserliche Marine. It is a marvelous album for housing any postcard or photograph collection, especially a Navy one.
$150.00

 

 

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13-940 ENLISTED MAN’S SERVICE PLAQUE FROM SEEBATAILLON Nr II. This is a plaque that displays a Seebataillon Nr II NCO’s photograph and service information. Seebataillon Nr II was based at Wilhelmshaven, Germany’s naval port on the North Sea. Members of Seebataillon Nr I were based at Kiel. Prior to WW I, the German Seebataillone had a mission similar to that of the U.S. Marines. They provided shipboard security, and provided security in embassies and consulates. They also provided security in various German spheres-of-influence such as China, where Seebataillon III was stationed. [Tsingtau was Seebataillon III’s base city in the leased territory known as Kiautschou. Technically, it was NOT an ordinary colony, but a territory leased from Imperial China for 99 years, as Hong Kong was by Great Britain. This meant it was not placed under the Imperial Colonial Office’s (Reichskolonialamt) supervision, but under that of the Imperial Naval Office (Reichsmarineamt or RMA). As a result, its five governors were naval officers with the rank of Kapitän zur See, serving under the RMA’s Secretary of State, Alfred von Tirpitz (online source: Wikepedia article, "Kiautschou Bay Concession."].
Today we are offering a unique plaque detailing a Seebataillon Nr II NCO’s service from 1905 through 1908. The plaque, which is made of wood, measures 11 ½" x 7 ½." The plaque is quite "busy" with high-relief, carved, wooden symbols representative of an Imperial German Period sailor’s life. At the very top is a Hohenzollern Crown, flanked in the upper left and right corners by the letters "S" and "B." The number "II" appears directly below, flanked in turn by the royal stole flowing out from the crown. Matching life preservers, each with two oars extending through their centers, stretch down the frame’s two sides. A pair of crossed anchors decorates the bottom’s center point. [We see the latter on all of the Seebataillone enlisted men’s and NCO’s shoulder straps. Their Bataillon number appears on them in Roman numeral form. While only three Seebataillone existed prior to WW I, five existed during the lead-up to the war and in its early days. When Germany’s Chinese territory was captured in 1914, the remnants of Seebataillon Nr III became captives and were transported into China, where they received far better treatment than did British and American captives during WW II]. Flanking the crossed anchors is an "05" in the left corner and an "08" in the right. Actually, the "5" of "05" is missing, but its outline remains, so we can tell with total certainty that the man served in the Bataillon from 1905 into 1908.
Our man’s photograph dominates the frame’s center, surrounded by a brown, textured-paper matte that measures 6" x 4." The photograph (which may be a Carte de Visite (CdV) features the NCO in his dienst uniform (his daily-wear tunic sporting shoulder straps rather than a dress uniform’s epaulettes). He is wearing an NCO’s Schirmmütze that displays ONLY a reich’s kokarde. [Like the Navy to which they were attached, Seebataillone did NOT display any states’ kokarden on their Schirmmützen, mützen or tschakos]. Our man also wears his sword, with a Seebataillon belt and buckle around his waist.
A wall hanger is available on the reverse. This is an impressive display commemorating an NCO’s proud service in Seebataillon Nr II shortly after the 20th Century’s onset. With the exception of the missing "5," and a separation in the panel covering its reverse (evidently present from its early 20th Century framing), it is in perfect condition.
$550.00

 

 

 

 

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13-974 DECORATION/DOCUMENT/PHOTOGRAPH GROUP FROM NAVAL OFFICER WHO FOUGHT ABOARD S. M. S. HESSEN AT BATTLE OF JUTLAND (SKAGERRAKSCHLACHT). This is a marvelous group from an officer who served aboard the Linienschiff (Ship-of-the-Line) S. M. S. Hessen at the Battle of Jutland (Skagerrakschlacht). The Battle of Jutland was the Great War’s most prodigious naval conflict. The battle commenced on 31 May, and continued through 1 June 1916. Historians continue to debate who won the battle to this day. Great Britain lost fourteen ships representing 117,000 tons, while Germany lost a total of eleven ships representing 62,300 tons. [Please note: Britain lost more large ships, which accounts for the tonnage size difference]. In terms of casualties, Great Britain suffered nearly 6,100 killed, while Germany lost 2,500 of her sailors.
Kaiser Wilhelm II pronounced the battle a huge German success and bestowed the Orden Pour le Mérite on Admiral Franz Hipper, whose actions as leader of the I Scouting Group helped save the German fleet. [Hipper’s native Bavaria awarded him the Military Max Joseph Order, which elevated him to knighthood, meaning he was known as Franz von Hipper from that point onward]. Hipper and his I Scouting Group, which primarily consisted of Battle Cruisers, Cruisers, etc., were fast and mobile. Hipper placed his ships between the British fleet and the main body of the German High Seas Fleet commanded by Admiral Reinhard Scheer. Hipper’s strategic actions enabled Scheer to withdraw his forces on the morning of 1 June 1916.
The S. M. S. Hessen, a Braunschweig Klasse Linienschiff was attached to Scheer’s main body of battleships during the battle. She had been commissioned in 1905. After her sea trials a year later, she was attached to the II Battleship Squadron, (with which she still served at the Battle of Jutland). By the time WW I began she was obsolete, as several generations of newer, bigger, faster, better-armed ships had been produced. She was pressed into service for the Battle of Jutland, which she survived unscarred. The Hessen played a crucial role in the great battle. She and the II Battleship Squadron’s other old battleships were placed between the German fleet and its British pursuers, thus permitting the bulk of the High Seas Fleet to escape.
Serving aboard the S. M. S. Hessen during that historic battle was young Oberleutnant zur See der Reserve Heinrich Kühl. I have no idea what his duties and responsibilities were onboard. Her technical specifications show that she had a crew of 343. [By comparison, the newer German battleships (S. M. S. Bayern and S. M. S. Baden) had a crew compliment of 1,271]. Although the aging battleship could not compete on equal terms with the newer British battleships, the Hessen managed to escape the battle without a single hit.
After the battle Hessen und Bei Rhein’s Großherzog, Ernst Ludwig, bestowed the Allgemeines Ehrenzeichen mit der Inschrift für Tapferkeit (General Decoration with Inscription for Bravery) to "his" battleship’s entire crew. The group includes this decoration’s actual award document (urkunde), which measures 8 ¾" x 11 ½." The award is granted to Oberleutnant der Reserve Heinrich Kühl. It specifically mentions that he served aboard the S. M. S. Hessen on its front. The award was made on 1 September 1916. Ernst Ludwig’s bold black ink signature is readily apparent. The document’s reverse features the S. M. S. Hessen’s official hand stamp. He received it on 25 September 1916 on board the ship. It also was signed by the ship’s commander, Kapitän zur See Rudolf Bartels. The document has an 2 ½" tear at the top where it has been folded, as well as a 1" tear at the bottom. The document also sports holes punched into it so it could be placed in a file. Kühl’s actual Hessen decoration and its ribbon accompany the document.
The group includes a mounted photograph of Heinrich Kühl together with his pretty young wife and child. The oval-shaped photo measures 3 ¾" x 5," and is mounted on a piece of sturdy, gray paper measuring 6 ¼" x 8 ¾." Its reverse features their names written in pencil.
The group further includes a one-page, handwritten letter from Kühl that is dated 3 June 1916, two days after the battle. We do not have a translation of its contents; we are leaving that to its buyer. A second typewritten page accompanies the letter. It is obviously from an old typewriter, not a modern printer. It is dated 2 June 1916, and appears to discuss British losses, specifically naming British ships.
All in all, it is an interesting small group that reveals WW I’s biggest naval battle from one man’s standpoint. We have added a postcard depicting the S. M. S. Hessen (mailed on 23 November 1916) for your edification and enjoyment, as well as to display with the group.
$495.00

 

 

 

 

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13-933 FULL COLOR POSTER : IOAN GRUFFUDD AS HORATIO HORNBLOWER. This is a full-color poster of the star Ioan Gruffudd, of the BBC series, Horatio Hornblower. It is a fine poster of the star with one of his ships. The BBC series is based on the books written by C. S. Forrester. The beloved character was first played by Gregory Peck in the 1950's. The British series contains in eight full-length movies, but, unfortunately, did not depict all the volumes in Forrester’s set. [Another interesting tidbit, Gene Rodenberry, creator of the Star Trek television and motion picture juggernaut, based James T. Kirk’s character on Horatio Hornblower]!
If you are a student of Napoleonic naval history, this 36" x 24" poster is for you.
$15.00 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-858 COLOR DOCUMENT - ONBOARD CRUISER EMDEN CROSSING EQUATOR. The first time a sailor crosses the equator has always been a memorable event, no matter to which navy or merchant shipping line he belongs. The crossing generally involves an appearance by King Neptune, the novice is hazed by experienced crew members, and general merriment ensues.
It was no different in the post-Imperial German Navy, as evidenced by this large colored document. It measures 11 ½" x 15 1/4." A 1914 Iron Cross overlays an anchor in its upper left corner. A German warship (presumably the Emden) occupies the document’s top center. Below it, King Neptune, his queen and two mermaids wait for the ship to cross the equator. Many other colorful oceanic motifs decorate its surface. The date 1 January 1927 is mentioned at the bottom, so the event took place in the Reichsmarine aboard the Emden.  It is a handsome, unusual document.
$295.00

 

 

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13-803 AUTOGRAPHED BIOGRAPHY - OBERLEUTNANT zur SEE FRIEDRICH CHRISTIANSEN. This is an autographed biography of Oberleutnant zur See Friedrich Christiansen (1879-1972). Christiansen. Christiansen was a prewar naval pilot who received his certificate early in 1914. He was credited with a total of thirteen victories, including a British submarine! He was awarded the Orden Pour le Mérite on 11 December 1917. He was one of only three Naval aviation officer to be awarded the PLM.
After the war, he was a pilot for Dornier and flew the Dornier Do. X across the Atlantic in 1930. In 1937, he was appointed Korpsführer of the NSFK (National Socialist Flying Corps). He later became a General der Flieger in the Luftwaffe. He commanded all German troops in Holland during WW II. He died in 1972, one of the last of WW I’s pilots to win the PLM.
$250.00

 

 

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13-878 FRAMED S.M.S. KAISERIN POSTCARD. The S.M.S. Kaiserin was a part of the four-ship "Kaiser" Battleship Class. She was commissioned in 1913 and participated in many naval actions during WW I. Most important, she participated in the Battle of Jutland, which took place on 31 May 1916. This is a period-framed postcard of the S.M.S. Kaiserin. The postcard identifies the vessel in the photograph as the S.M.S. Kaiserin. Along with the ship’s identification, it includes a few quick facts about her. The frame measures 5 3/8" x 6 3/8," and consists of a simple black molding with a gilt, interior trim. Chipping appears on three or four frame sections. A hanger is on the reverse. It is an attractive piece in spite of the damage, and budget-priced. $40.00

 

 

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13-795 EHRENRANGLISTE DER KAISERLICHE DEUTSCHEN MARINE - 1914-1918. Both the German Army and Navy produced annual publications that showcased their various units and to which ones officers were assigned. (As a matter of fact, they shared a single book in the 1860's, before Germany’s consolidation and a new Kaiser greatly increased their sizes). Rangliste are very useful tools for researching officers and their assignments at given times within their careers. One of the most useful of the books was the one that showed the combined results during the years of WW I (1914-1916). Both the Army and Navy produced such a book after WW I. The navy was always the smaller branch, with fewer officers. This was further influenced by the larger numbers of army officers killed in action.
Today we are offering Ehrenrangliste der Kaiserliche Deutschen Marine (Honor Rank List for the Imperial German Navy), which covers the years 1914 through 1918. The book was published in 1930. It is quite large, measuring 8 1/4" x 5 1/4" x 3 1/4" and weighing a hefty 4 lb. 7 ounces. With it, you can seek out a particular officer and determine his rank, what ships or other assignments wherein he served, etc. These books are quite helpful and hard-to-find. I have seen these fetch nearly $1,000 in the past. The binding on our example is a bit weak, so caution should be exercised when using it (which should go without saying for an eighty-year-old book. [SALES ON ALL RANGLISTE ARE FINAL. We do NOT send them out on approval, or for someone to do research and then return them. Please keep this in mind when ordering any Rangliste].
$495.00

 

 

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13-959 1914-1918 IMPERIAL GERMAN NAVY RANGLISTE. Kaiserliche Marine Ranglisten were produced on an annual basis. They were far smaller than Army Ranglisten because the Navy was a far smaller service. The beauty of the naval version is that it shows the ship or other assignments held by officers. Naval Ranglisten are very difficult-to-find in general, and WW I’s 1914-1918 edition is the most-prized. Actually published in the 1920's, they reveal all of the naval officers’ activities for the four years of the Great War. This is a fabulous reference that is almost impossible to find. The volume measures 5 ½" x 8 ½" x 3 1/4," and weighs 4 pounds and 8 ounces. [SALES ON ALL RANGLISTEN ARE FINAL. We do NOT send them out on approval, or for someone to do research and then return them. Please keep this in mind when ordering any Rangliste]. $495.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-468 SPECIALLY-AWARDED ROYAL YACHT S. M. Y. HOHENZOLLERN PHOTOGRAPH TO CREW MEMBER SIGNED BY COMMANDER.  This is a very unique photograph that was awarded to an S. M. Y. Hohenzollern crew member by her captain.  The photo shows the S. M. Y. Hohenzollern in profile. The photo comes from a photographic shop in Kiel and measures 8 ½” x 10.” The photo is attached to a matte that has the information it was awarded to “Obermatrosen (upper sailor) Nowack” for honorable service while aboard the S. M. Y. Hohenzollern.  The signature of the S. M. Y. Hohenzollern commandant is present. I cannot read his name, but he was a member of nobility or royalty as his signature is preceded by “von.” The Hohenzollern’s stamp appears to the left of the commandant’s signature. The measurement of the matted photograph is 4 ½” x 6 ½.”  I have never seen such an award before.  It is an important piece of veteran’s memorabilia, similar to a veteran’s stein, canteen, pipe and so on. It is very impressive. $650.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-757 COLOR LITHOGRAPH - ROYAL YACHT - S.M.S. KAISERADLER. This is a matted color lithograph of Kaiser Wilhelm I’s royal yacht. Wilhelm I’s tastes were far more modest than his grandson, Wilhelm II. Wilhelm I was a very hard worker with simple predilections. This was shown in the limited number of uniforms that he owned, his tableware, and even in his royal yacht. While Wilhelm II had several yachts, including the impressive S.M.Y. Hohenzollern, his grandfather was satisfied with the ONE.
The lithograph measures 12" x 14 ½." It is housed in a simple white matte that measures 7" x 9 ¼." The first thing I believe you will notice is that the vessel is a side-wheel paddle boat! The vessel, which is known as the S.M.Y. Kaiseradler (it was misidentified initially as the Hohenzollern), was built in 1876, shortly after Wilhelm I became Germany’s first Kaiser. The ship had a crew of 150 men. Some other technical details are included. The lithograph is signed (or rather, initialed) and dated 1890. This was two years after Wilhelm I’s death, his son Friedrich III’s untimely demise, and Wilhelm II’s accession to the throne. I am quite confident that not terribly long after Wilhelm II came to power a newer and bigger yacht was planned! In addition to two kriegsflagges, please note the Kaiser’s Standard flying above the S.M.Y. Kaiseradler.
$595.00

 

 

 

 

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13-826 PANZERSCHIFF 1st CLASS S. M. S. BRANDENBURG PEN-AND-INK LITHOGRAPH.  This is a lithograph of the Panzerschiff S. M. S. Brandenburg, the lead ship of the Linienschiffe (ships of the line) First Class.  The ship was commissioned in 1893 as Kaiser Wilhelm II’s first effort to modernize Germany’s Navy.  The ship was sent to China in 1900 during the 1900-1901 Boxer Rebellion.  Along with many of Germany’s newest ships, she became outdated very quickly.  WW I saw her  used first for coastal defense, then as a floating barracks. She was scrapped in 1920.  The lithograph measures 8” x 10,” and is housed within a matte measuring 4 ½” x 7.”  If you look carefully, the Kaiser’s Standard flies from one mast,  proclaiming that he is aboard Germany’s then most-modern battleship. $295.00

 

 

 

 

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13-871 S.M.S. KAISERIN AUGUSTA SAILOR’S FRAMED PRESENTATION - CHINA. Beginning in the late 19th Century, Germany began building up its presence in China. They "assumed" land at Khiatsou and expanded their foothold in Asia. Ultimately, Germany maintained an entire squadron in China under the command of Vizeadmiral von Spee. When WW I began, he realized that Germany could not hold its base in China. He made arrangements for his squadron to depart and head back to Europe. Sadly for him, after a successful battle off Chile’s coast in November 1914, he met up with the British again in the Battle of Falkland Islands in December 1814. The bulk of his squadron, as well as the Vizeadmiral and his two sons, perished with their respective ships. 
German sailors who served in China found remarkable ways to commemorate their service. One very popular way was to produce an embroidered, silk likeness of their ship. Along with that likeness, their ship’s name and their years of service were noted. Usually, a place was provided where a sailor could place his photograph. In most cases you could see that the vessel’s name on his cap tally matched the ship’s name indicated on the silk montage. 
The S.M.S. Kaiserin Augusta was commissioned in 1895. She was an all-new ship-type, with all-new engines. She was the first Kaiserliche Marine ship to have three shafts and propellers. She had other problems with her guns, so it was another two years before she was ready for fleet service. From 1897 through 1902 she served in East Asia as a part of its Cruiser Squadron. This time included the 1900-1901 Boxer Rebellion. She was in the middle of all the action taking place. In 1902, she returned to Germany and was placed in reserve status. Ship design had passed her by, and she was no longer considered front-line-capable. She was reactivated in 1914 and placed in the Baltic Seas Fleet under the command of Prussia’s Großadmiral Prinz Heinrich. She first was used for coastal defense, then for artillery training. Finally, she was broken up and scrapped in 1920. 
Today we are offering something just a bit different. It is a framed presentation for the S.M.S. Kaiserin Augusta. The central piece shows a silk-embroidered ship’s profile. A multitude of silk thread colors appear in the image, which is so detailed that the kriegsflagge can be clearly seen flying from the ship’s stern. The smaller German National Flag flies from the bow. Directly below the ship we see S.M.S. Kaiserin Augusta handsomely embroidered in silk lettering. Around its image is a red, black, and white thread rope that replicates the German national colors. Below that are multicolored oak leaves and acorns. The image is under glass. The oval-shaped image’s overall measurements are 7 ¾" x 10."  
As handsome as the image is, it is the frame that really makes it special. The frame is made of lacquered wood that was hand painted in China with images of birds, leaves, and flowers. [It is similar to the wood and lacquer painting on a photo album we are offering in our Colonial Merchandise Page (click here to see)]. The frame measures 12 ½" x 15." Sadly, some areas of the frame are damaged and show the bare wood underneath the lacquered finish. A simple hanger is on the reverse, which I suggest that you reinforce or replace. 
This is a super combination that shows the beauty and artistic attention of China’s artists. I cannot begin to imagine how many hours the artists required to fashion the ship’s likeness. Nor could I begin to count the multitude of stitches made to produce the image. It is simply gorgeous. The same applies to the frame, as well as the patience and dedication that it took to produce it. It is a pity that it sustained some damage, but it remains a gorgeous presentation that highlights Germany’s power in 1898-1914 China. $
895.00

 

 

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13-811 ORIGINAL CATALOG - AUGUST LÜNEBURG. This is a catalog from the August Lüneberg firm, which had offices in Kiel and Flensburg during the Imperial German Period. They sold naval officers’ daggers, portépées, etc. The catalog measures 9 1/4" x 12 1/4" and has a total of ten pages. The firm’s specialty was officers’ daggers. Several pages showcase their various models. The blades exhibit various levels of engraving. Even Damascus blades are listed. I see full daggers ranging from 30 to 70 Marks for a dagger with a Damascus blade. Farther along are such things as officers’ belts, belts with hangers, and portépées. [My mouth really watered when I saw a Konteradmiral’s epaulettes for 70.50 marks! His daily-use uniform’s shoulder boards cost 13.75 marks]. Lüneberg’s also sold miniatures of decorations that could be attached to tie chains. The back page’s reverse features pistols from such firms as Browning, Mauser, etc.
Although complete, the catalog is NOT in perfect condition. Some foxing affects its pages. It also has a cut where a portion of the paper is missing on several pages.
$195.00

 

 

 

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13-756 FRONT PAGE NEWS STORY - U-9 SINKING THREE BRITISH CRUISERS. This is a front page news story from the Dresdner Anzeiger on 23 September 1914. It relates the exploits of Otto Weddigen and the U-9's intrepid crew, who sank three British Cruisers in less than an hour.
It was a historic event for the Kaiserliche Marine. Weddigen became Germany’s first WW I naval hero.
$125.00

 

 

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13-713 FRONT PAGE - SINKING OF THREE BRITISH CRUISERS - OTTO WEDDIGEN AND U-9 - 1914. This is the front page of a Hamburg newspaper, which proclaims the exploits of Otto Weddigen and the tiny U-9 crew when they sank three British Cruisers. The front page is dated 24 September 1914. It measures 22” x 15 1/2.” Additional information is included about this historic event, for which Weddigen received the 1914 Iron Crosses 1st Class and 2nd Class. All the other members of his crew received the Iron Cross 2nd Class. A section, which measures 4 1/2” x 3 1/2,” has been clipped from the paper.
This is an exciting item that would make a great addition to any Navy collection. $180.00

 

 

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13-753 NAVY - CHRISTMASTIME BOOKLET - DECEMBER 1914. This is a booklet which commemorates both Christmas 1914 and the island of Helgoland off Germany’s coast. The publication’s cover shows two German soldier flanking a Christmas tree that has many lighted Christmas candles. A kriegsflagge is also in the scene, along with a view of Helgoland. Inside the booklet are twenty-four pages chronicling a wide variety of topics. The booklet’s binding is a multicolored red, black, and white string. $75.00

 

 

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13-779 SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT CARD - RELIGIOUS SERVICES - S.M.S. KAISER WILHELM II. This is a card that announces special religious services aboard the battleship S.M.S. Kaiser Wilhelm II. The announcement is printed on heavy card stock and measures 9" x 6." It has two holes punched in the side as it was once included in someone’s records, perhaps a person who was in attendance that day. It was used on 18 April 1901, while the Kaiser’s son Prinz Adalbert was in attendance. The card was bent in half at some point. $50.00

 

 

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13-572 XBW U-BOOT WAR PATROL FILE (KRIEGSTAGEBUCH) - U.C. 22. This is a consignment item. We have been lucky enough to locate another small batch of U-Boot war patrol files (Kriegstagebuch). We recently had one for Wilhelm Canaris (an admiral and head of the Abwehr during WW II, who was executed in connection with the 20 July 1944 plot to assassinate Adolf Hitler. Thousands were scooped up in the net after this act. None were more highly placed than Canaris and Generalfeldmarschall Erwin Rommel). It sold very quickly. These files are quite interesting. They make wonderful research resources. This particular file is for U.C. 22, which was commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Bunte.
The report covers the period of 16 to 29 January 1918. The report, which is tied together with a string, basically consists of extracts from the U.C. 22's log. It reports positions and various things that happened every day. Each of the daily reports is signed by Bunte.  Also attached are sections that deal with the expenditure of ordnance. As a U.C. was a smaller vessel, it was also charged with laying mines. Bunte mentions this activity, the firing of torpedoes, as well as the number of cannon rounds fired. What I really enjoy in these files are the wonderful accompanying maps. In the case of the U.C. 22, three are included! Two are quite simple, showing where the mines were laid. They are hand-drawn (possibly traced from a "real" map). A larger map shows the U.C. 22's course during the cruise’s (approximately) two weeks.
This is a wonderful document/map set that will allow the U-Boot enthusiast to delve into the daily workings and activities of a U-Boot at sea. It was not all the sinking of merchantmen!
$1,495.00
 

 

 

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13-602 KRIEGSTAGEBUCH FOR 6. MINEN-RÄUM- HALBFLOTTILLE. This is a Kriegstagebuch (War Diary) for 6. Minen-Räum-Halbflottille. This was a mine laying unit. The group of vessels was commanded by Oberleutnant der Reserve Rossenbeck. The period covered is 16-31 August 1918.  Approximately thirteen pages are included,  a daily log of the unit's activities. It denoted numbers of mines laid and their exact locations. Each entry is signed by Rossenbeck. Two maps are also included that were signed by him and show where the mines were laid.  We have had similar documents as this for U-Boote but this is the first that we have offered for a mine-layer. $750.00  

 

 

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13-476 SAILOR'S VERDIENSTKREUZ FÜR KRIEGSHILFE DOCUMENT (NO MEDAL). This is an award document for the Verdiensttkreuz für Kriegshilfe (Service Cross for War Aide). The document, which measures 8 1/4" x 6 3/8," was issued to a sailor on 12 April 1920. It bears the stamp of the Reichs -Marine-Amt. It was signed by a representative of der Chef der Admiralität.  The document is in very good condition. $95.00   

 

 

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13-118 NAVY LAND PLANE MILITÄRPAß. The Navy Land Plane Jastas of the Naval Air Service were relatively small and quite elite compared to the Navy Sea Plane arm. These squadrons, which flew in Flanders alongside Army Jastas, produced some of the best fighter pilots of the war. These men were often among those with the highest scores of planes shot down. This militärpaß was to an enlisted man who served in one of these jastas, most likely as a ground crewman. The man first entered the Navy in June 1917 and was initially assigned to II. Matrosen Division. He survived the war.  Entries as late as 1920 appear. Documents such as this are very difficult-to-find. $575.00

 

 

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13-714 NAVY MILITÄRPAß & MINIATURE CATHOLIC PRAYER BOOK. This is an enlisted sailor’s militärpaß. The man was born in 1888 and first entered the Navy in 1909. He was assigned to the 1. Matrosen-Division. He completed his service in 1911. He was recalled to the Navy on 1. August 1914. We see many entries after that. Apparently, he served aboard the S. M. S. Prinzregent Luitpold. It appears that he was mustered out after WW I in Bremen. The militärpaß is extensively filled out. Included with it is a miniature Roman Catholic prayer book that was prepared for soldiers and sailors where space for their personal effects was at a premium. The small book measures 3” x 2” x 1/2.” It was published in 1916. The man’s militärpaß notes he was a Roman Catholic, so the book is probably his.  It has many passages that would be of comfort and useful to a man at war. $225.00

 

 

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13-321 NAVY LONG SERVICE AWARD DOCUMENT. This is an award document for a Long Service Award in the Kaiserliche Marine. It is the 1st Class award. It represents fifteen years of long service. It is signed by a Kapitän zur See in 1920.  The document still bears the Kaiserliche Marine unit's stamp. It is a fine Navy document. $110.00 .

 

 

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13-676 TWO POSTCARDS & U-BOOT SPENDE BADGE. This mini group consists of two postcards and an U-Boot Spende Badge. The first postcard salutes the U-9 and her brave crew, under Otto Weddigen, for sinking three British Cruisers in a single afternoon. On a halyard we see "U-9" and pennants with the names of the three cruisers that the U-9 sank. The postcard was mailed in 1918. It has a message on the reverse. The second postcard is a part of the same series. It speaks of the noble eagle and the Navy. It was mailed to the same person by the same writer. The final piece of the mini group is a circular cardboard stickpin measuring 1 ½" in diameter. It supports the 1917 U-Boot Spende. It is a much different variation of U-Boot Spende Badges than we normally see. $295.00 

 

 

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31-102 DOCUMENT APPROVING THREE-YEAR KAISERLICHE MARINE-ENLISTMENT. This document measures 6 9/16" x 8 3/8." It confirms approval for a man’s three-year-enlistment in Abteilung Nr 2 at the Wilhelmshaven naval dockyard. The man was to be a machinist. The document is dated 16 December 1913 and is signed by an Oberleutnant zur See. The document has been folded. $50.00 

 

 

 

 

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13-633 NAVY VETERANS’ PUBLICATION. This is a magazine published by a group representing Navy veterans. The magazine’s cover features a Viking Ship. It is dated 1 June 1932. Inside, a photograph and special section appears about Admiral Franz von Hipper, who had died the month before. An article also is included about the S. M. S Lützow, von Hipper’s flagship at the Battle of Jutland (Skagerrak), which was lost during the battle. Many other interesting articles about the Battle of Jutland appear, as well as other officers’ stories. One advertisement caught my attention. It is an offer for the 1914-1918 Navy Honor Rangliste. The cost in 1932 was 30 Reichsmarks! Today, IF you can even find the book, you will pay HUNDREDS of dollars. I have heard of one exceptional copy that changed hands for $1,000! [It is a great research work. If you do not have a copy, it is part of the Rangliste CD series we offer. For $75.00, you can receive both the Army and Navy 1914-1918 Ranglistes, and the 1914 Army and Navy Ranglistes (the Army’s Rangliste is also hard-to-find, but not quite as pricey as the Navy’s). This one CD contains even more than I have mentioned. If you tried to purchase all of the books on the disc, you would spend close to $2,000]! Returning to the magazine, you will have some fun looking through it and learn something new as well.  $50.00 

 

 

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13-465 1915 NAVAL EDITION "WELTKRIEG! KRIEGS UND RUHMESBLÄTTER" Nr 48. This is a mini magazine that was published in 1915. It has only four pages, with photos on all four that salute a number of naval heroes and ships. On the cover is Großadmiral Alfred von Tirpitz, who was the State Minister of the Kaiserliche Marine. In American terms, this would have made him the Secretary of the Navy. While not an active fleet admiral, von Tirpitz was the architect of the modern German Navy, and wielded tremendous power. The second page shows three vessels. First is the S. M. S. Eitel Friedrich, which visited Newport News, VA in 1915. Below that is the S. M. S. Kronprinz Wilhelm, which also visited Newport News that year.
The final ship on that page is the S. M. S. Königsberg, which was involved in one of the most amazing stories in German East Africa during the early war years. Page three shows TorpedoBoote and U-Boats in action. Page four shows the U-9 and her commander, Kapitänleutnant Otto Weddigen. Weddigen was Germany’s first U-Boat/ Navy hero. In the early days of WW I he sank three English Cruisers in a single afternoon. This is a lovely photographic history of the German Navy during the period of 1914/1915.
$75.00 

 

 

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Buy Two or More Navy Lithographs Below
Receive a
20% Discount. Buy Five or more and receive a 25% Discount.

 

13-496 BLACK & WHITE LITHOGRAPH - TORPEDOBOOT IN ACTION. This is a black and white lithograph that has been removed from a book. It measures 9" x 12 1/4." It depicts a torpedoboot in choppy seas. $5.00

 

 

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13-497 BLACK & WHITE LITHOGRAPH - TROOPS LANDING IN FRANCE. This is a black and white lithograph that has been removed from a book. It measures 12 1/4" x 17 3/4." It comes from an original work by Professor Willy Stower. Stower was perhaps the best-known of the WW I German naval artists. This work was done in August 1914, immediately after the declaration of war. It shows English troops landing in France. $10.00  

 

 

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13-458 FULL COLOR PLATE OF SEA BATTLE. This is a full-color plate that has been removed from a book. It shows a number of German ships in a battle from 26 April 1916. This is from an original painting by Professor Hans Bohrdt. It would be great for framing, matting, or display on its own. It measures 12 1/4" x 9." $15.00 

 

 

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13-459 BLACK AND WHITE PLATE OF GERMAN FORCES AT BATTLE OF DOGGERBANK. This is a black and white plate from a book that shows the Battle of Doggerbank. Doggerbank is to the right of England’s coast. It preceded the Battle of Jutland. Admiral Franz von Hipper commanded the German forces in the engagement. It is from an original painting by noted naval artist Willy Stower. It would be great for framing, matting, or display on its own. It measures 12 1/4" x 9." $15.00 

 

 

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13-486 COLOR LITHOGRAPH - BRITISH AND FRENCH FLEET AT ATHENS, GREECE - 1 SEPTEMBER 1916. This is a color lithograph of the French and British fleet riding at anchor in Athens in September 1916. This has been taken from a book, and measures 12 1/4" x 17 ½." It covers a two-page spread, and has been folded. This came from an original painting by Professor M. Zeno Diemer. In addition to the various ships in the harbor, two airplanes are in the sky overhead. $15.00

 

 

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13-487 BLACK AND WHITE LITHOGRAPH - SINKING OF THE LUSITANIA. This is a black and white lithograph that has been removed from a book. It shows the steamer Lusitania as she is sinking, with her crew and passengers leaving the ship. This comes from an original work by Claus Bergen. It was done in 1915 at the same time the painting was executed. The lithograph measures 12 1/4" x 17 3/4." $15.00


 

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13-488 BLACK AND WHITE LITHOGRAPH - S. M. S. EMDEN. This is a black and white lithograph of the S. M. S. Emden that has been removed from a book. The small cruiser gained great fame early in the war. This shows her in action against the enemy. The lithograph comes from an original work by the noted naval artist Professor Hans Bohrdt. It measures 12 1/4" x 17 3/4." $15.00

 

 

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13-502 BLACK & WHITE LITHOGRAPH - BATTLE OF CORONEL by PROFESSOR HANS BOHRDT. This is a black and white lithograph of the Battle of Coronel. It measures 9" x 12 1/8." The original work was done by Professor Hans Bohrdt. It features several ships in high seas battling it out at close range. $10.00 

 

 

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13-503 BLACK & WHITE LITHOGRAPH - SINKING OF S. M. S. KÖNIGIN LUISE by PROFESSOR HANS BOHRDT. This is a black and white lithograph of the sinking of the S. M. S. KÖNIGIN Luise. It measures 12 1/4" x 17 3/4." The original work was done by Professor Hans Bohardt. The S. M. S. KÖNIGIN Luise was a Minelayer. She is shown being sunk by British ships. $10.00 

 

 

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13-496 BLACK & WHITE LITHOGRAPH - TORPEDOBOOT IN ACTION. This is a black and white lithograph that has been removed from a book. It measures 9" x 12 1/4." It depicts a torpedoboot in choppy seas. $5.00

 

 

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13-497 BLACK & WHITE LITHOGRAPH - TROOPS LANDING IN FRANCE. This is a black and white lithograph that has been removed from a book. It measures 12 1/4" x 17 3/4." It comes from an original work by Professor Willy Stower. Stower was perhaps the best-known of the WW I German naval artists. This work was done in August 1914, immediately after the declaration of war. It shows English troops landing in France. $10.00  

 

 

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Flags - Badges - Patches - etc.

 

 

13-1023 XRH GROßADMIRAL’S SHIP’S FLAG WITH STORAGE BAG. This is a consignment item. The Kaiserliche Marine (and its improvement) was a project close to the hearts of Kaiser Wilhelm II and the Imperial German Navy’s Secretary of State, Alfred von Tirpitz. As Queen Victoria of England’s eldest grandson (Wilhelm’s mother was Victoria’s eldest daughter), Wilhelm spent a good part of his childhood visiting England and hobnobbing with his many royal British relations. His regard for his grandmother’s naval forces eventually became a passion for Germany to equal and SURPASS his British cousin’s Royal Navy. Under Wilhelm II and von Tirpitz a massive build-up took place that saw the Kaiserliche Marine’s scope greatly advance. No matter how many ships Germany built, however, England continually raised the ante by producing more ships with much-improved designs. Germany had spent much of the 18th and 19th Centuries struggling to unite its many small states and kingdoms, and fending off incursions from the likes of Napoleon, which left it little time to pursue foreign colonial expansion. By the time Germany finally consolidated into an empire, only a few small areas were available for colonization. Also, Chancellor von Bismarck had disdained colonial expansion, and had seen little need for a larger navy, which was one of the many reasons that von Bismarck found himself retired shortly after Wilhelm II ascended the Imperial throne!
Once he came into power, Wilhelm II wasted no time in expanding his beloved navy. Until 1901, the Kaiserliche Marine’s highest rank had been that of an Admiral, which was equivalent to a General der Infanterie. [The German Navy’s only three "Flag Ranks" were Konteradmiral, Vizeadmiral, and Admiral]. This meant the Navy had no rank equivalent to the Army’s Generaloberst or Generalfeldmarschall. Wilhelm changed the situation in 1901 by establishing the rank of Großadmiral and, unsurprisingly, naming himself the
rank’s first recipient. From that time until the German Empire’s demise, a total of six men achieved the rank, (listed below).

 

1901 - Kaiser Wilhelm II (1859–1941)
1901 - King Oskar II of Sweden (1829–1907)
28 June 1905 - Hans von Koester (1844–1928)
4 September 1909 - HRH Prinz Heinrich of Prussia (1862–1929)
27 January 1911 - Alfred von Tirpitz (1849–1930)*
*
[Promoted on an Honorary Basis w/o Patent, and thus not authorized to wear a Großadmiral’s crossed batons.
Instead, his shoulder boards and/or epaulettes displayed four pips].
31 May 1918 - Henning von Holtzendorff (1853–1919)

 

Our offering today is an ultra rare Großadmiral’s flag. [PLEASE NOTE: in the Kaiserliche Marine, an Admiral of any rank was considered a "Flag" officer. Thus he was permitted to fly "his" flag from any ship that he was stationed aboard or visiting. This was especially true when a Großadmiral visited a ship]. The flag is amazingly beautiful to look at. My imagination immediately whisks me to when it flew from a battleship hosting one of the Großadmirale (a rather infrequent occasion). The massive flag measures 87" x 89" (220cm x 225cm) and is made with two different types and weights of cotton. The flag’s bulk consists of very gauzy, lightweight cotton, which was necessary for such a large flag. When held up to the light, it appears almost opaque. The areas featuring the German cross sport a far heavier cotton to protect the overall design and promote an inherent sense of strength.
The flag’s center features the pair of crossed batons emblematic of a Großadmiral’s office and rank. [To view similar crossed batons, you can look at those on Kaiser Wilhelm II’s single shoulder board (click here to see) or those on Großadmiral Hans von Koester epaulettes (click here to see) Both are currently for sale]. A Großadmiral’s batons, whether on his shoulder boards/epaulettes or on the actual baton he carried, were totally different from those for a Generalfeldmarschall (and far more beautiful, in my opinion). At any rate, the flag’s batons are very large and beautifully detailed. They give the flag some vivid pops of color, including metallic gold, blue, and red. The metallic paint was applied by hand. The flag’s artwork is amazing. The time and effort that went into creating this breathtaking flag had to have been considerable.
Many different sections of the flag do display stains. I do not know what caused them, but they appear across the flag. The flag shows MINIMAL mothing. NO markings whatsoever are present on the flag’s bunting. Two attachments for the lanyards necessary for when the flag was flown are present. Its storage bag is made from lightweight canvas and measures 11 ½" x 42." The bag is dingy with age and has several holes and rust stains at its base. The base is held together by a metal clip in its center.

 

The flag is in surprisingly good condition, considering its age, size and the materials from which it was constructed. The consignor tells us that the auction house from which he purchased the flag stated that it had belonged to Großadmiral von Holtzendorff.  No provenance other than this information is available, however. It remains an amazing historical artifact.
$7,995.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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20-176 NAVAL STANDARD FOR HOUSE OF HOHENZOLLERN PRINZ. This is an incredible standard/banner that was used on Kaiserliche Marine vessels. The banner proclaimed the presence of a Prinz of the House of Hohenzollern on board. Three Hohenzollern Princes are the most likely to have had this particular flag flown for them. The senior of the three was Großadmiral Prinz Heinrich (1862-1929). He was Kaiser Wilhelm II’s (1859-1941) younger brother. The second was Kaiser Wilhelm II’s son, Prinz Adalbert (1884-1948). The final prince was Prinz Heinrich’s son, Prinz Waldemar (1889-1945). That said, if ANY Hohenzollern Prinz were visiting a ship (even if he served in the Army), this flag would have correctly flown to honor and recognize him. The standard measures a whopping 6’ 11"(83") x 6’ 6"(78.") The banner’s center sports a large Hohenzollern Eagle within a shield. Below that is an important symbol of Prussian royalty, the Black Eagle Collar. [An excellent representative of the Collar resides at Haus Doorn, Kaiser Wilhelm II’s residence-in-exile, in the Netherlands. The last example I saw on the market, which had belonged to the King of Bulgaria, sold with its presentation case for more than $100,000!]
Above it all sits a red and gold Hohenzollern Crown. The entire arrangement is superimposed on a large Iron Cross measuring 5' 11" (71") x 6' 6"(78.") Two more smaller Hohenzollern Crowns appear to the right of the shield. The upper left and lower right corners feature smaller Hohenzollern Eagles. Two repair patches show in the upper and lower right corners. No tearing or rips are apparent, although substantial fading has occurred from exposure to the elements. The standard’s right side displays a lanyard and other fittings by which it can be attached to a ship’s halyard. Normally, members of the royal house only visited battleships and battle cruisers, so typically one would not see this banner on a small vessel. The flag is somewhat similar to the Kaiser’s Standard, but some differences exist. Its overall condition is average, or a bit better.
This is not an unused, or mint flag. It has seen service. It exhibits the expected wear a cotton item such as this experiences when exposed to salt air, salt water, smoke, etc. It is a great item for any royal or naval collection. $3,495.00
 

 

 

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13-846 BATTLESHIP (LINIENSCHIFF) S.M.S. BRANDENBURG'S FLAG. The S.M.S. Brandenburg was a Kaiserliche Marine battleship. Generally, Imperial German battleships were named after royal personages, states within the Reich, or other geographic places of special interest. The S.M.S. Brandenburg served as the German Navy’s historical turning point in its efforts to modernize and attain status quo with the Great Britain’s Royal Navy. First, we must remember that Kaiser Wilhelm II (1859-1941) ascended to Germany’s throne in 1888. (It took place less than one-hundred days after his grandfather’s, Kaiser Wilhelm I, then his father’s, Kaiser Friedrich III’s deaths). Wilhelm II was eager to put his "brand" on Germany and secure his place in history. By 1890, he had dismissed the great "Iron Chancellor," Otto von Bismarck, and begun his efforts to upgrade and modernize Germany’s Army and Navy. The early German Navy had been very old-fashioned and quite small. Through many building programs and with Admiral (later Großadmiral) Alfred von Tirpitz’s support, Kaiser Wilhelm II transformed the Kaiserliche Marine from a coastal defense unit into a force that projected Germany’s might as it sailed the world’s oceans.
Germany built its first battleships in the early 1890's. They were officially termed "Linienschiffe," alluding to the Royal Navy’s Napoleonic-era term "Ships-of-the-Line." The latter were the largest and most powerful battleships of their day, particularly in terms of their firepower. [Lord Admiral Horatio Nelson’s flagship at the Battle of Trafalgar, the H.M.S. Victory, was a Ship-of-the-Line. He led England to victory over Napoleon’s joint French and Spanish fleets in 1805, although Nelson did not survive to see the battle end. The H.M.S. Victory has survived to this day and is proudly displayed at Portsmouth].
Wilhelm II wanted to show his grandmother, Queen Victoria, and his English cousins that Germany also was an international power. Germany already had the world’s best, most modern army, and Wilhelm wanted a navy to match it. Thus, in 1891, construction began on the S.M.S. Brandenburg, Germany’s first modern battleship. In fact, she was the first of a four-ship class that became known as the Brandenburg Class. She was commissioned in 1893. Kaiser Wilhelm II was aboard her for her first trials. She was fast (for her day), and had 28cm cannons mounted in her main armament. In 1900, she and her three sister ships from the I. Linienschiff Geschwader (1st Battleship Squadron) were dispatched to China to protect Germany’s interests during the Boxer Rebellion. After this event, she returned to Germany. The Brandenburg was decommissioned and re-commissioned several times during the following years as she was modernized and newer, bigger, and faster battleship classes were brought into service.
When WW I began, it was clear she was no longer fit for front-line service. She was relegated to coastal defense, sailing both the Baltic and North Seas from 1915-1916 as a part of the II. Manouversquadron. From 1916 through 1918, she was used as a floating barracks at Lebau. [Today, Lebau serves as a museum and German Navy Memorial. It also hosts a special WW I and WW II U-Boot memorial]. After WW I ended, the S.M.S. Brandenburg was scrapped in 1920.
This brings us to today’s offering. We have the ensign (flag) that flew aboard the S.M.S. Brandenburg. It was not its kriegsflagge (war flag), but rather a banner that indicated the ship’s ties to the German province of Brandenburg, for which the vessel was named. The ensign is made of a gray linen/cotton (it may have been white at one point). Imprinted on one side only is a Prussian Eagle in red, yellow and blue. In the center of the Eagle’s chest is a blue shield with what may be a torch in its center. The flag measures 33 1/4" x 39." Metal attachments for the halyard are present on the bunting. The ensign could be flown today, with the correct attachments. "Flg. Boot" and "S.M.S. Brandenburg" also are stenciled in black on the bunting.
While its overall condition is surprisingly good for a flag that was produced well over one-hundred-years ago, areas of moth nips are scattered about the flag. While I cannot verify it beyond all doubt, it is quite possible this ensign flew above Kaiser Wilhelm II on that November 1893 day when the S. M. S. Brandenburg was launched as the pride of the Kaiserliche Marine. It is also possible it was flying when the S. M. S. Brandenburg arrived in China.
Also included with the flag is a color lithograph of the S.M.S. Brandenburg. The highly-detailed lithograph measures 7" x 4 5/8." It is housed in a matte measuring 10" x 7 ½." The vessel is seen at anchor in a port. Under any circumstances, it is an amazing piece of history that would make a first-rate addition to any collection.
$2,195.00

 

 

 

 

 

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13-245 KONTERADMIRAL'S KAISERLICHE MARINE FLAG FOR USE ABOARD HIS FLAGSHIP. This is a very rare flag for a Kaiserliche Marine Konteradmiral. This large flag, which measures 2.4 meters x 2.4 meters, has its original rope lanyards. These would have flown from the admiral’s flagship. The size and the rank of the flag are stenciled in black on the bunting. As this is a larger flag, several areas reveal moth nips. One tear is visible, as well as a stained area. The basic theme is a black cross on a white background. Two black "meatballs" denote the flag's rank. This flag is very rare since few admirals were at sea with their ships.  It is a real find for the navy collector. $895.00

 

 

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25-61 NAVY VETERANS' ASSOCIATION - TABLE BANNER. This is one of the most interesting veterans' table banners that I have encountered. It is especially interesting because it is for a group of naval veterans from WW I and before. The banner’s stand measures 31" tall. It has a brass base, which is dented. A brass rod also in it extends upward. An extension fits into the rod that extends both vertically and horizontally. The horizontal piece features delicate lattice work on which appears an anchor and a sailing ship. The horizontal piece extends out 12 3/4." All of these pieces disassemble, and take a mere thirty seconds to set up again. Attached to the horizontal piece is the banner. The banner is attached by three extensions that come out of the banner’s top. The banner measures 10 1/2" x 10." It is made of hand-woven silk.
One side features the Bavarian group’s name. Twin Eagles appear on panels. Below that a rampant Bavarian Lion appears. We also see the date 1930, which is when it was placed in service. The banner actually was for the ladies auxiliary of the veterans’ group. This side has suffered some running of the silk, which is more correctly termed "shredding." It is very common with silk items. You have to remember that the banner is 82-years-old! The banner’s reverse is even more interesting. It recreates one of WW I’s most famous paintings. It is known as "The Last Man." It depicts a German sailor clinging to his ship’s wreckage and thrusting the kriegsflagge defiantly in the air as a ship steams by in the background.
This painting was recreated in postcards, etc. during the war. It proclaimed the German sailors’ fighting spirit, and their service to the Fatherland. The scene is encircled by a life preserver that serves as the frame for the painting’s recreation. In gold on the red life preserver is the legend "Marine-Verein Erlangen." Anchors are on all four corners of the banner. It is a very handsome and interesting banner. It would make a superb display item for any collection. It has loads of eye appeal.
$1,395.00

 

 

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13-1005 XLL MINIATURE U-BOOT VETERAN’S BADGE - AUSTRIA. This is a consignment item. It is a miniature Austrian Veteran’s U-Boot Badge. It features an eagle with partially folded wings. The center of the eagle’s chest features a shield with enameled diagonal stripes of Austria’s national colors. Grasped in the eagle’s talons is a large, oversized blue enamel "U" trimmed in gold. [A very small chip appears on the blue "U." You must look closely to see it]. The reverse sports a horizontal, rather than a vertical pin, for attaching it to a garment. Its overall dimensions are 1 ¼" x 1 ¼." Overall, it is in very fine condition. $495.00 2nd PRICE REDUCTION: $350.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-1024 TWO-PIECE SCREWBACK U-BOOT BADGE. The U-Boot Kriegsabzeichen (War Badge) was first authorized on 1 February 1918. It was awarded after the completion of two war patrols. Many sailors and officers did not receive or acquire the badge until AFTER the war. Many of the badges produced during the war’s closing months also were low-quality pieces. [PLEASE NOTE: During WW I, the Kaiserliche Marine only offered THIS badge in addition to an assortment of pilots’, observers’, and gunners’ flight badges for the various aircraft types flown by naval personnel. It was only during WW II that the Kriegsmarine offered a wide variety of qualification badges for every type of Navy ships, from submarines to S Boats (similar to the US Navy’s PT Boats) all the way up to battleships.
I am offering an entirely different type of U-Boot Badge today, however. Quite frankly, it is a variety that I have not ever seen before: a two-piece screwback U-Boot Badge. The badge itself measures 2" x 2." Instead of the usual horizontal or vertical pin for fastening the badge to its owner’s tunic, its back features a lovely design that was unscrewed from the badge proper. Its owner almost would have had to cut a hole into his tunic in order to attach the badge to it.
The badge’s obverse features an U-Boot in profile within a laurel leaf wreath. The wreath and U-Boot are topped by a Hohenzollern Crown. The badge’s reverse reveals that a female receptacle was installed onto it. The male portion is located on a decorative circular backing plate that screws down into the female receptacle. A small sharpened pin that helped steady the badge on the wearer’s tunic also appears on one point of the decoration’s reverse. Last of all is the manufacturer’s hallmark for Walter Schot. The badge is in a most pleasing condition, overall.
This is a superb badge and one of the rarest examples you will ever find.
$1,095.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-1007 GODET HALLMARKED U-BOOT BADGE. This is an U-Boot Abzeichen (Badge). It sports a fine gilt finish, and displays a Hohenzollern Crown over an U-Boot in profile. The badge measures 1 ¾" x 1 ¾." Its reverse features a high-gloss backing with a beautifully-crafted swollen (coke bottle) pin. The pin displays a stamped "G" for Berlin’s Godet. This badge is hard-to-top. $995.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-1016 U-BOOT BADGE WITH .800 SILVER HALLMARK. This is an exciting WW I U-Boot Badge. The award was instituted on 1 February 1918. Like the Imperial German Air Service’s assorted flight badges, it was a qualification badge. Aviators and sailors needed to fulfill certain qualifications in order to receive one of these badges. Whereas the Imperial German Air Service had four basic types of flight qualification badges, the Kaiserliche Marine (excluding its Air arm) had only one U-Boot Abzeichen. Just prior to WW II (starting in 1935), the Kriegsmarine had added a number of badges for its various sizes and types of surface ships, in addition to the U-Boot Badge. To earn the qualification badge, every sailor (officer, NCO, or enlisted man) had to serve aboard a U-Boot and participate in three war patrols.
The badge is oval-shaped and measures 2" x 2." An oval wreath of leaves contains within it a U-Boot complete with its conning tower and bridge. A periscope is also evident. A detailed Hohenzollern Crown appears at the badge’s top. The badge displays a marvelous patina that has not been cleaned for decades, turning it a burnished gilt.
The badge’s reverse features a gorgeous swollen (coke bottle type) pin. This particular style of pin (also seen on custom 1914 Iron Crosses 1st Class) is a mark of excellent quality and attention to detail. We can also see on the pin where it has been slightly pressed in. It is a sure sign that the badge was actually worn on a tunic. More often than not, loops of thread were sewn into the tunic and the pin was then passed through them. Even a sturdy pin like this would have had difficulty in piercing a tunic’s heavy wool. The badge’s silver (.800) hallmark is stamped on the submarine’s reverse.
All in all, it is an excellent badge that is worthy of any collection. $995.00 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-1017 XRH U-BOOT BADGE. This is a consignment item. The U-Boot Badge was instituted on 1 February 1918. Like the Imperial German Air Service’s assorted flight badges, it was a qualification badge. Aviators and sailors needed to fulfill certain qualifications in order to receive one of these badges. Whereas the Imperial German Air Service had four basic types of flight qualification badges, the Kaiserliche Marine (excluding its Air arm) had only one U-Boot Abzeichen. Just prior to WW II (starting in 1935), the Kriegsmarine had added a number of badges for its various sizes and types of surface ships, in addition to the U-Boot Badge. To earn the qualification badge, every sailor (officer, NCO, or enlisted man) had to serve aboard a U-Boot and participate in three war patrols.
The badge is oval-shaped and measures 2" x 2." An oval wreath of leaves contains within it a U-Boot complete with its conning tower and bridge. A periscope is also evident. A detailed Hohenzollern Crown appears at the badge’s top. The badge displays a marvelous patina that has not been cleaned for decades, turning it a burnished gilt.
The badge’s reverse features a gorgeous swollen (coke bottle type) pin. This particular style of pin (also seen on custom 1914 Iron Crosses 1st Class) is a mark of excellent quality and attention to detail. Another unusual detail of the pin is that is vertical, not horizontal as on most badges. We can also see on the pin where it has been slightly pressed in. It is a sure sign that the badge was actually worn on a tunic. More often than not, loops of thread were sewn into the tunic and the pin was then passed through them. Even a sturdy pin like this would have had difficulty in piercing a tunic’s heavy wool.
Finally, the number "2" appears on the pin. I have never seen this marking before, so cannot tell you its meaning. It is a lovely example, especially if you are looking for a vertical pin rather than a horizontal one. $795.00 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-891 SLEEVE PATCH FOR NAVY MACHINEGUN CREW MEMBER. This is one of the rarest Navy sleeve rating patches you will ever see. I was quite stunned when I first saw it. It is for a man assigned to a naval machinegun crew, most likely aboard a ship rather than a shore installation. The patch is oval-shaped and measures 3" x 2."  The patch’s background material is black. A red border encircles the patch’s edge. A profile of a M-08 Machinegun appears within the border. (It is similar to the Army Machinegun Badge). As the German Navy was considerably smaller than the German Army, it is only logical that the number of Navy men trained to crew a machinegun was a mere fraction of their army counterparts.  The patch is in stone-mint condition. We are very pleased to share it with you. $695.00

 

 

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13-790 NAVY SLEEVE RATING PATCH - MUSICIAN. This is a most interesting sleeve rating patch for an enlisted sailor’s tunic. In the Kaiserliche Marine (as is common in the U.S. Navy to this day), it was standard practice to wear a rating patch on a tunic sleeve. It allowed one to determine what job the sailor performed with a quick glance. This is a rating patch for wear on the winter uniform. The patch is oval-shaped and measures 4" x 3." The background is navy-blue. Embroidered on that in yellow ribbon is a Hohenzollern Crown. This appears above an anchor over which a lyre is superimposed. Thus, our man served as a musician. Larger vessels had ships’ bands and perhaps on certain smaller ships, a bugler was employed (of this I am not certain). It is also possible that a man might have held this rating if assigned to shore duty. At any rate, the patch is in excellent condition. $250.00

 

 

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13-414 NAVY OBER-SCHREISBERSMAAT’S WINTER TUNIC RATING PATCH. This is a sleeve rating patch for an Ober-Schreibersmatt (Chief Clerk’s Mate). The patch is for this NCO-level sailor’s winter tunic. It is in very fine condition. $225.00

 

 

 

 

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13-417 SLEEVE OR CAP BADGE FOR THE REICHSMARINE OR MERCHANT MARINE. This is an interesting sleeve or cap badge for either the Reichsmarine (Post WW I) or the Merchant Marine. Mounted on a piece of feldgrau wool measuring 2 ½" x 3" is a gilt-toned fouled anchor flanked by oak leaves. It is in very fine condition. $95.00


 

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13-412 RATING PATCH FOR NAVY OBER-BOOTSMANNMATT'S WINTER TUNIC. This is the sleeve-rating-patch for an Ober-Bootsmannmatt (Chief Boatswain’s Mate). The patch is for this NCO-level sailor's winter tunic. It is in very fine condition. $225.00 .

 

 

 

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13-414 RATING PATCH FOR NAVY OBER-SCHREISBERSMAAT'S WINTER TUNIC. This is the sleeve rating patch for a naval Ober-Schreibersmatt. (Chief Clerk’s Mate). The patch is for this NCO-level sailor's winter tunic. It is in very fine condition. $225.00

 

 

 

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13-409 RATING PATCH FOR NAVY OBER-INGENIEUR APPLIKANT'S SUMMER TUNIC. This is the sleeve-rating-patch for a naval Ober-Ingenieur-Applikant (Chief Engineering Cadet/Trainee). The patch is for this NCO-level sailor's summer tunic. It is in very fine condition. $225.00

 

 

 

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13-410 RATING PATCH FOR NAVY OBER-INGENIEUR APPLIKANT'S  WINTER TUNIC. This is the sleeve-rating-patch for a naval Ober-Ingenieur-Applikant  (Chief Engineering Cadet/Trainee). The patch is for this NCO-level sailor's winter tunic. It is in very fine condition. $225.00

 

 

 

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13-411 RATING PATCH FOR NAVY OBER-SIGNALMAAT'S WINTER TUNIC. This is the sleeve-rating-patch for a naval Ober-Signalmaat (Chief Signalman’s Mate), which is equivalent to a Senior Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy. The patch is for this NCO-level sailor's winter tunic. It is in very fine condition. $250.00


 

 

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13-446 NAVAL ARTILLERY RATING PATCH FOR KAISERLICHE MARINE ENLISTED MEN. This is an oval rating patch that was worn on an enlisted man’s uniform sleeve. It has a dark-blue woolen base that is embroidered in yellow with a Hohenzollern Crown, crossed cannons, and an anchor. Some mothing shows on the patch’s upper left. This is not detractive to the patch’s overall presentation. $150.00

 

 

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13-447 RATING PATCH FOR KAISERLICHE MARINE'S ORDINARY SEAMAN. This is a rating patch for an enlisted sailor in the Reichsmarine, from between the two World Wars. The patch has a blue woolen base, with a fouled anchor embroidered on it in yellow. $50.00

 

 

 

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13-797 ENLISTED SAILOR’S SHIPBOARD ARTILLERY UNIFORM SLEEVE PATCH. This is a blue wool sleeve patch for a sailor aboard a German naval ship who was assigned to the ship’s gun crew. A yellow embroidered pair of crossed cannons overlays an anchor. As this is a dark-blue patch, it was for a winter uniform. The patch is oval-shaped and measures 3 1/4" x 2 1/2." $125.00

 

 

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13-638 CHEVRON - ONE-YEAR-VOLUNTEER - KAISERLICHE MARINE. This is a One-Year-Volunteer’s arm chevron from the Kaiserliche Marine. As we have chronicled elsewhere, the One-Year-Volunteer (OYV) entered the German military service on a different program from the men doing two-year mandatory service. After most men completed their two-year service, they entered the reserves. They only were called to active service when additional man power was needed. This was the situation, of course, when WW I began. Most reserves were called back to active duty. Returning to the OYV, when entering the military, they essentially paid all of their own expenses. That is, the government did not pay for their equipment (uniforms, headgear, etc.). They were expected to supply their own gear, just as officers did. Since these men provided their own gear, they were allowed a certain amount of latitude in their uniforms and headgear. Men who enlisted in the OYV program were generally from the German middle class or higher. They had more money to spend on their uniforms than say farmers who came into the service. Many OYV’s bought their uniforms and headdress from the same purveyors that the officers did. They were allowed to mimic many officers’ headdress characteristics. For example, they were not allowed to purchase a pickelhaube EXACTLY like an officer’s, but they could get VERY close. At least ONE of the details had to be different from an officer’s. It is common to see a silk liner and officer’s leather liner on an OYV’s pickelhaube. This was one of the extra allowances that OYV’s were allowed to make. They also were allowed to wear a special trim on their shoulder straps that clearly indicated they were an OYV, not a normal enlistee, or even an NCO.
I cannot state with authority that Navy OYV’s wore the trim on their shoulder straps. This device, however, serves the same purpose. It was worn on the sleeve. It is "V-shaped." Each arm of the "V" measures 3 1/2." Woven into the patch is a design of red, black, and white. This is the first time that I have run across one.
$150.00

 

 

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13-961 XBG PATRIOTIC BADGE FROM NAVY VETERANS' GROUP SALUTING KRONPRINZ WILHELM. This is a consignment item. It is a patriotic badge for a naval veteran’s group. It is oval in shape and measures 3/4" x 1 ½." The basic badge is gold-toned, with four enamel colors: black, white, blue, and green. At its bottom are the words "Prinz Friedr. Wilhelm," which refers to Crown Prince Wilhelm, the Kaiser’s eldest son. A golden rope is wrapped around the badge in three places, and also serves as a framing device. A small square design that has the look of a flag appears at the top. Inside that we see an anchor, what appears to be a key, and the letters "N. D. L."
On the reverse we see either "Geschütz" or "Ofschütz." Although the badge is quite lovely by itself, another addition makes it truly amazing. Its original circular sales tag is attached. It appears that the price was 1.25 Reichs Marks. The name of the Berlin firm that sold the badge appears on the tag’s opposite side. A small lead seal also is attached to the tag’s thread. The badge is in excellent condition.
$175.00

 

 

 

 

 

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22-85 PATRIOTIC PIN FOR NAVAL ADMINISTRATION OFFICER. This is a wonderful patriotic pin that salutes Germany’s Naval Administration officers. As the badge has a silver finish it replicates the epaulette or shoulder board for a higher ranking officer. The pin measures 2" x 1 3/4" and has a fine silver finish.
The reverse sports clips that secure portions of the badge, and a large horizontal pin that secured the badge to a garment. 
[The latter  information comes from a helpful reader in Germany]. $495.00

 

 

 

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13-827 MINIATURE - NAVY BLACK WOUND BADGE. This is a high-quality miniature of the Navy Black Wound Badge. It usually was attached to a miniature chain that would  secure a tie. It has a fine black finish and measures 1" x 3/4." $50.00


 

 

 

 

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13-792 MEMORIAL MEDAL - S.M.S. MOLTKE. This is a memorial medal that was issued to honor the S.M.S. Moltke. I am not sure when the medal was issued, but an interesting story about it exists. The decoration is bronze-toned and measures 1 1/4" in diameter. The obverse displays a profile image of Helmuth Karl Bernhard Graf von Moltke, the Prussian Army’s Chief of the General Staff. (After the Empire was created in 1871, he became the Chief of Staff for all of Germany’s armies). Von Moltke became a military legend in Germany. Under his control the Prussian Army was modernized with better training, better tactics, superior weapons, and a rail transportation system that moved troops quickly to where they were needed. His generals in the field were the best in Europe. During the 1866 Austro-Prussian War and the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian War, his troops made short work of the enemy and the wars ended with all his objectives achieved. Ultimately, he became known after his death as "von Moltke the elder," while his nephew, who became Chief of the General Staff early in WW I, was known as "Moltke the younger." To illustrate the extent of the German public’s admiration for him, postcards (from before and after his death, and particularly during WW I) showed von Moltke, von Bismarck, and Kaiser Wilhelm I as the team that led had Germany to greatness.
I acquired a small horde of these commemorative medals from a collector in Hamburg. They were originally manufactured by the Hamburg firm of M. Fleck & Söhne. Each medal comes inside the original packet in which it was purchased. (I have little information about M. Fleck & Söhne, other than it was a military effects store serving the needs of military personnel from 1882). The paper packets measure 5 1/4" x 2 3/4." While all the medals come in the packet as described, some come with a ribbon and some do not. We are offering a small number of these very special decorations.
The medals are priced at
$150.00 WITH the packet and a ribbon. We are offering them for $125.00 in the packet and WITHOUT a ribbon. [If you would like more than one of these handsome decorations, we can offer even better pricing].

 

 

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13-371 NAVY VETERANS ASSOCIATION BADGE FOR EHRENWART IN THE ORIGINAL PRESENTATION CASE. This is a cased example of the Ehrenwart for the Deutscher Flotten-Verein. The presentation case measures 3 3/4" x 2 1/8." The pin sports a silver-toned Hohenzollern Crown to which is attached a red, black, and white ribbon. The ribbon is in turn attached to a gilt-toned anchor. In the center of the anchor is a very elaborate multicolored, enameled decoration for the association. It is beautifully crafted and of the highest quality. The case is in very good condition. The case has a beige leatherette exterior. Inside, a crème-colored silk upper liner displays the legend: "Ehrenwart * Deutscher Flotten-Verien."  The lower half of the case where the badge is nestled is black velvet. $375.00 . .

 

 

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13-532 NAVY VETERAN’S ASSOCIATION BADGE - ORIGINAL PRESENTATION CASE. This is a consignment piece. It is a Navy Veterans Association Badge. It represents the "German Flotten-Verien." The badge is a two-piece affair. It is silver-toned. The top piece is a Hohenzollern Crown and Stole. Connected to it and the bottom piece is a red, black, and white ribbon. The bottom piece is also silver-toned. It is made to look like a life preserver. The center of the life preserver is multicolored enamel. It comes in a handsome presentation case. $395.00  

 

 

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13-859 FOULED ANCHOR PLAQUE. This is an interesting, oval-shaped badge that measures 2" x 2 1/4." It is bordered with laurel leaves. Its interior features a gold, fouled anchor against a field of blue. Some light chipping shows at the top. Two screw holes appear at the twelve and six o’clock positions. On the reverse we see a Bonn manufacturer’s hallmark. I cannot determine the plaque’s age (nor can I say with absolute certainty that it came from the Imperial period). With a bit of imagination, it can add to a collection or display. I have received the opinion that this badge is most likely a post WW II badge that might have been attached to the grill of an automobile. It is for the Marine-Offiziers-Vereinigung. This information comes from a helpful reader in Germany. $95.00

 

 

 

 

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13-409 RATING PATCH FOR THE SUMMER TUNIC OF A NAVY OBER-INGENIEUR APPLIKANT. This is the sleeve-rating-patch for a Ober-Ingenieur-Applikant. This is for a Chief Engineering Cadet or Trainee. This patch is for the summer tunic of this NCO-level sailor. It is in very fine condition. $225.00

 

 

 

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13-410 RATING PATCH FOR THE WINTER TUNIC OF A NAVY OBER-INGENIER APPLICANT. This is the sleeve-rating-patch for a Ober-Ingenieur-Applikant. This is for a Chief Engineering Cadet or Trainee. This patch is for the winter tunic of this NCO-level sailor. It is in very fine condition. $225.00 . . .

 

 

 

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13-446 NAVAL ARTILLERY RATING PATCH FOR ENLISTED MAN IN THE KAISERLICHE MARINE. This is an oval rating patch that was worn on an enlisted man’s uniform sleeve. It has a dark-blue woolen base that is embroidered in yellow with a Hohenzollern Crown, crossed cannons, and an anchor. Some mothing shows on the patch’s upper left. This is not detractive to the patch’s overall presentation. $150.00

 

 

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13-447 RATING PATCH FOR AN ORDINARY SEAMAN IN THE REICHSMARINE. This is a rating patch for an enlisted sailor in the Reichsmarine, from between the two World Wars. The patch has a blue woolen base, with a fouled anchor embroidered on it in yellow. $50.00

 

 

 

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Miscellaneous

 

 

13-983 NAVAL BINNACLE AND SHIP’S WHEEL DESK PIECE. This fascinating desk piece consists of a ship’s wheel attached to a binnacle. A binnacle is a waist-high stand or cabinet containing navigational gauges, such as the ship’s magnetic compass. Usually mounted on the deck or ship’s bridge, it was positioned near the helmsman for quick reference when necessary. Sometimes it is actually attached to the ship’s wheel, as is the case with today’s offering.
Our brass-toned metal binnacle is attached to a wooden base, and stands 5" tall (the wheel’s spokes add another inch of height). An actual glass-covered compass is held in the binnacle’s top section. A six-pointed brass ship’s wheel is attached to the binnacle’s top front section. It is very attractive. [The binnacle itself may be brass, or it may be tinted aluminum].
$150.00    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-965 S. M. S. KAISER LIFE PRESERVER SHOWING VETERAN’S SERVICE ONBOARD. This is for the first S. M. S. Kaiser, which was built in England then incorporated into the German fleet in 1875. She was a three-masted armored frigate. She was placed in and out of service several times and saw some modernization to her weapons systems. In 1897, she played a central part in seizing Kiautschou and also went to Manila Bay during the 1898 Spanish-American War. She saw extensive operations in East Asia for years.
Today we are offering you a patriotic piece for a sailor who served onboard the S. M. S. Kaiser from 1889 to 1892. It is a life preserver that is painted red and measures 4" in diameter. The vessel’s name
and the years that the sailor served aboard her are painted in white on the red. Strung to the life preserver’s edges are small rope lines like those attached to full-sized examples. It is a marvelous example of veteran’s material from the Kaiserliche Marine’s early days. $175.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-966 S. M. S. MOLTKE LIFE PRESERVER SHOWING VETERAN’S SERVICE ONBOARD. This is for the first S. M. S. Moltke, which was incorporated into the German fleet in 1911. She was a Schlacht Kreuzer and the lead ship of the Moltke Battle Cruiser Class. She was commissioned in 1911 and saw action at the Battle of Jutland (Skagerrak), where she suffered light damage. She was scuttled at Scapa Flow in 1919 with the German Navy’s better ships. Today we are offering you a patriotic piece for a sailor who served onboard the S. M. S. Moltke. It is a life preserver that is painted red and measures 3" in diameter. The vessel’s name is painted in white on the red. Strung to the life preserver’s edges are small rope lines like those attached to full-sized examples. It is a marvelous example of veteran’s material from the Kaiserliche Marine’s 20th Century years. $125.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-1038 FRAMED PHOTO - S.M.S. VINETA - LIFE PRESERVER SHAPED. The S.M.S. Vineta was considered a Große Kreuzer (Heavy Cruiser), the forerunner of the Hochseeflotte’s battle cruisers. The ship was commissioned in 1899 as one of the Viktoria Luise Class’s five ships. [Viktoria Luise was Kaiser Wilhelm II’s only daughter, who married Braunschweig’s Herzog Ernst August]. The ship saw service in the West Indies, South America, Africa and even made port in the USA at New Orleans, Louisiana, and Newport News, Virginia. She also occasionally accompanied the Kaiser as an honor vessel when he summered in Norway aboard his royal yacht, the S.M.S. Hohenzollern.
All of the Viktoria Luise Class’s five ships underwent modernization between 1905 to 1910. Part of the latter process was converting from three funnels to two. Our photo shows the ship with its original three funnels, indicating that it dates prior to 1905.
When WW I began, the Vineta was assigned to coastal defense in the Baltic under Großadmiral Prinz Heinrich’s command (he was Kaiser Wilhelm II’s younger brother). She did not serve in this role for long, then was anchored at Kiel to serve as a floating barracks for U-Boot crews while they were in port. She was scrapped in 1920.
Today we are offering a photograph of the S.M.S. Vineta that is framed within a life preserver replica. These frames were quite popular among sailors and their families. The frame measures 4 ¾" in diameter, while the photo within measures 3 ½" in diameter. The wooden frame is red, with "S.M.S." painted in white at the top. The ship’s name, "Vineta," appears at the frame’s bottom. Glass protects the photograph. Four thin fabric bands appear around the frame. A thin rope is threaded around the frame, which could serve as a hanger at the frame’s top. It could be hung on a wall or just displayed as a decorative piece. $95.00 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-1039 FRAMED PHOTO - NAVAL TRAINING SHIP - LIFE PRESERVER SHAPED. A note that refers to this ship as "Rover" appears on this framed presentation’s reverse. Further information on the tag states "Schiffsjungen-schuerschiff 1863-1890 Kgl. Preuß. Marine," indicating that the vessel, a two-masted sailing ship, was used by the Prussian (later the Imperial German) Navy from 1863 to 1890 as a training ship for young naval candidates.
[The Navy was a very low priority during Prussian King Wilhelm I’s (later Germany’s first Kaiser) reign. As far as Wilhelm I, Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, and General Staff Chief and architect of Germany’s modern Army Helmuth von Moltke (the Elder), the Army was of SUPREME importance. Since the German Navy operated primarily in the North Sea and the Baltic, with few forays into other oceans, they felt that coastal defense ships were more than adequate. This all changed, however, when Wilhelm II assumed the throne in 1888. In his desire for Germany to become a world player with both an Army AND a Navy to back it up, he soon set the stage for WW I].
Today’s offering is a photograph of the Rover that is framed within a life preserver replica. These frames were quite popular among sailors and their families. The frame measures 4 ½" in diameter and the photo within measures 3" in diameter. The wooden frame is white, with "328" painted in black at its top (this may refer to its training class). "Kgl." appears at the nine o’clock position we see, at the three o’clock position we see "Marine," and a fouled anchor is at the six o’clock position. A glass cover protects the photograph. Four thin fabric bands appear around the frame. A metal eyelet has been screwed into the top to serve as a hanger. This is the oldest item that we have ever offered from the German Navy. $95.00 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-948 ONE-YEAR-VOLUNTEER SEAMAN’S S. M. S. KÖNIGSBERG LOCKER. One-Year-Volunteers served in both the Navy and the Army.  These individuals were responsible for buying their own equipment and other gear.  They were also responsible for their food and board.  Today we are offering a metal sailor’s locker that was used to store his personal belongings and gear on land and at sea.  The locker appears to be made of tin.  It measures 29” x 16” x 7 1/2.”   The locker’s total weight is X lbs.  The locker’s exterior is painted a subdued gray. [In contrast, the upper lid’s interior has a much brighter metallic finish].  The outer lid features an engraved plaque with information on its original owner, as listed below.    

 

 

“Mey Gerhard H.
Einj.-Freiw. (One-Year-Volunteer)
S. M. S. Koenigsberg
II. W.D.1.A
N 26298 M.T.
18 Wilhelmshaven”

Three closing mechanisms/locks appear on the locker’s front.  The ones to the left and right differ from the middle mechanism.  When one lifts the lid, a chain on the right that secures the lid to the locker’s bottom section.  A wooden box has been placed into and attached to this bottom half.  Its thin lid is painted red, with a thick line of gold-painted along its leading edge.  The wooden box opens up, allowing access to its storage area, which is completely painted gold.  Another metal plaque adorns the wooden box’s red and gold lid, repeating another version of the  information listed on the outside plaque.  It reads as listed below.    

“Gerhard H. Mey
Einj.-Freiw.
S. M. S. Koenigsberg
II. W.D.1.A.
N 26298 M. T.
18
Wilhelmshaven

The S. M. S. Königsberg was one of the Kaiserliche Marine’s more famous ships during WW I, revealing an intriguing history.  She was a Kleiner Kreuzer (Small Cruiser) that spent her early years (she was commissioned in 1907) serving as an escort for Kaiser Wilhelm II on his various cruises aboard his royal yacht, the S. M. Y. Hohenzollern.  The Königsberg was attached to the East Asia Squadron around WW I’s beginning.  She saw service in the Indian Ocean, with Dar es Salaam as her base.  When war finally erupted, she was tasked with raiding allied shipping in the region. [She achieved only limited success].  Eventually, the British ran the S. M. S. Emden, her small cruiser counterpart, to ground. Next, they began the search for the Königsberg.  Eventually, the Königsberg retreated up Africa’s Rufiji River to get away from the British Fleet.  Once the British discovered where the Königsberg was located, they made several attempts to sink her. Finally, they sent two special ships (monitors) from England that allowed them to lob shells at the German ship rather than shoot straight in.  Ultimately, the Königsberg was severely damaged with great loss of life. The German commander ordered his ship scuttled, AFTER they stripped-off  all of the ship’s armaments.  The ten main guns were given over to Generalmajor (and PLM-winner) Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck.  The Königsberg’s crew then joined their army mates, continuing to serve their ship’s guns for the remainder of WW I. [Von-Lettow Vorbeck’s story is just as interesting as the S. M. S. Königsberg’s.  He and his men pinned down more than 100,000 British troops during their adventures, leading the British on a merry chase across Africa for more than four years.  Von Lettow-Vorbeck only surrendered after the Kaiser ordered it, and returned to Germany as a national hero]! This interesting locker will make a fine addition to your collection (and also store a lot of goodies).  [Due to its weight, extra shipping charges will be required, ESPECIALLY overseas]. $1,295.00

 

 

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13-754 DESK LAMP - GERMAN MINELAYER GAUGE. This is a delightful table lamp made from a gauge used aboard a Kaiserliche Marine ship. It is a captivating lamp. I have had it converted from European electric current to U.S. current. It can easily be converted to other currents depending on your specific needs. The lamp stands an impressive 31 1/2" tall from its base to the highest point (not including the shade). I have a shade for it, but I recommend that you get a shade locally to suit your taste and needs. The lamp’s top boasts two sockets for light bulbs. I recommend a very low voltage. (I have been using spiral florescent bulbs).  [Please note: the lamp conversion is from a much earlier period, it is NOT modern-day.  While I cannot guarantee that is was made during WWI, it was probably constructed not long afterward]. The bulb-sockets are attached to a wooden spindle that extends down to the wooden stand holding the gauge. The spindle measures 14 1/2" in height. The wooden stand sporting the gauge measures 10." The gauge itself measures 6" in diameter. I was told by the seller that the gauge came from a minesweeper, but I cannot verify it. The gauge’s face has the following printed on it. The top two lines are in French, and translate as "Steel Mercury Expansion Thermometer. (We cannot translate Rmr.)

"Thermomètre à dilatation
de mercure à l’acier
Rmr.
Schaeffer & Budenberg
Buckau"

All of the above rests on a wooden base measuring 10 X 6" in diameter As previously mentioned, the gauge is embedded in a wooden stand. I cannot see the gauge’s reverse. I cannot see any other visible markings on the gauge. A brass handle is attached to the gauge’s bottom.
The lamp is fully operational. All you need to do is add bulbs, a shade, and plug it in. Then you will have a fabulous lamp for your display room, office, den, etc. I have owned it for more than ten years and used it daily in my office. It is time for it to move along to a new owner. [To make this more reasonable for shipping we will not include the lamp shade. Its inclusion would add considerably to shipping charges. You can buy a common one (as this is, and it is not original to the lamp) locally to add to the lamp. You'll be able to acquire one that fits your decor].
$995.00

 

 

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13-613 PADLOCK AND KEY - GERMAN NAVY SHIP. We always enjoy bringing you interesting and unusual items. This item certainly qualifies on both scores. It is a large, heavy brass padlock that was used to secure a locker or door where controlling access was vital. The padlock measures 2 1/2" x 2," and weighs 4.8 oz. It comes with its correct, original key. A serial number appears on it, as well as an "M" for Marine (Navy). It is a fun item. With some imagination, you will discover an interesting way to display it. $395.00

 

 

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13-844 NAVY OFFICER’S BINOCULARS IN CARRYING CASE. This is a fine pair of smaller framed Navy binoculars. They come from the Berlin firm C. P. Goerz. They are also marked as having a "6 x 30" field of vision and as Marine-Triëder. The leather-wrapped portions are complete and undamaged. The optics are just fine. This set could be used on a daily basis. A leather cap snaps over the eyepieces to keep them from harm. The leather strap to hang it around one’s neck is intact. The binoculars are housed in a fitted, leather carrying case. All in all, it is a superb pair of privately-purchased naval binoculars. $350.00

 

 

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13-804 PRIVATELY-PURCHASED NAVAL OFFICER’S BINOCULARS. This is an interesting pair of privately-purchased naval officer’s binoculars. As you look at them you will see a black leather exterior. Some of it has worn away in various places, and you can see that the binoculars’ case is made of brass. This is important, as brass was used in most naval instruments, gear, even their Iron Crosses. If you look carefully, you can see that they were manufactured by Carl Zeiss. They also have a leather strap. The optics are clear and clean. They can be used, if you so choose. The hood for one of the eyepieces is missing. $250.00

 

 

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13-1036 BINOCULARS - NAVY OFFICER. This is a compact pair of Navy officer binoculars. They were produced by Jena, a noted firm, which is stated on the binoculars’ left side. "Marineglas 440728 6X" appears on the opposite side. The strap is present, as is a leather cover that slips over the eyepieces. The optics are serviceable. This fine pair can be added to any Imperial German naval display. $125.00 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-865 LEATHER KAISERLICHE MARINE CIGAR CASE. German sailors were just as proud of their service to the Kaiser as were their army mates. Instead of the more commonly-seen veterans’ steins or pipes, this particular naval veteran opted to commemorate his service with a two-piece, leather, cigar case. The case measures 4" x 5." Embossed on the front is Kaiser Wilhelm II’s high-relief profile. He is identified as both Germany’s Kaiser and Prussia’s König. His likeness is very detailed. He is wearing a general’s überrock, complete with a neck order. Above and below his likeness we see the caption below.

"Zur Erinnerung an meine Dienstzeit (In remembrance of my service in the --)
bei der Kaiserlichen Marine
1903-1906"

No identification appears for the man or the ship on which he served. $125.00 

 

 

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13-721 BRASS SHELL CASING - U-BOOT DECK GUN. This is a brass shell casing of the caliber (8.8cm) and type that was used on German U-Boote. The casing is made of brass and stands 15 1/4" tall. It measures 3 3/4" in diameter at the top, and 4 1/2" in diameter at the bottom. The shell was produced at the massive Karlsruhe munitions works in 1911. If you look carefully, you will see a crowned "M," which indicates it is indeed a Navy-issued shell casing. It would make a great addition to a U-Boot display. The casing weighs 5 pounds. [Due to its extra weight, special shipping charges will be involved. Charges will be based on your location and the type of shipping you prefer]. $495.00

 

 

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13-550 FRAMED PHOTOGRAPH - S.M.S. PILLAU. It has been a long time since we have offered one of these little beauties. It is a framed photo of a German naval ship, with the frame in the shape of a life preserver! These were quite popular with German sailors, either for themselves or for their families back home. The frame measures 6" in diameter. The vessel’s name is hand painted on the preserver. Within its confines is a colorized picture of the ship, the S.M.S. Pillau. She was a small cruiser, commissioned in 1914. After the war she was handed over to the Italians. The ship was sunk in 1943, during WW II. Interestingly, the picture’s smokestacks and the hull’s upper part have been treated with a mother-of-pearl type reflective material (which does NOT show up in the photo). $110.00 

 

 

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13-643 KAISERLICHE MARINE TASCHENKLINOMETER IN ORIGINAL STORAGE CASE. This is a gauge, referred to as a pocket clinometer (taschenklinometer), used aboard Imperial German naval vessels. It may even have been used on Navy sailing ships. The clinometer is a brass cylinder mounted on an iron base. The base measures 16 mm long and 7 mm wide. The cylinder is 14.7 mm in length and 5 mm in diameter. A glass container is inserted inside the brass cylinder, which is filled with liquid.
The glass container is revealed by rotating a handle on the center of the brass cylinder. The liquid acts as a "level" in measuring the inclination of a ship relative to the horizontal. Some notes that came with the piece indicated it had to be used with a stopwatch and a sextant to reach the correct calculations. The clinometer comes in a rather crude metal container, which was once covered by a specially treated paper. This paper is now coming off. About a quarter of the case’s surface is uncovered. The case is 17.5 mm long, 2.5 mm wide and 3 mm high. The case separates into two parts. One of the case’s ends has come off, but is still present. Some judicious soldering could easily repair it. This remains a fascinating example of early 20th Century naval history.
$375.00

 

 

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17-585 PATRIOTIC BANGLE BRACELET - KRIEGSFLAGGE. This is a patriotic bangle bracelet. It measures 2 3/4" in diameter. It pulls apart to assist in placing it on a wrist. In the bracelet’s center sits a small, multicolored kriegsflagge. The bracelet appears to be made of German silver (nickel). It is very well made. $150.00

 

 

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13-862 ANCHOR & LIFE PRESERVER FRAME FOR SEEBATAILLON NCO. This is a patriotic wooden frame often used by members of the Navy or the Seebataillon. The frame is made to look like a life preserver that has been superimposed over an anchor. Patriotic slogans have been painted on the red and white life preserver. Two oars usually extended through the life preserver’s sides. Although a part of the oars is still visible, the complete oars are no longer present.
The frames were designed to house a CdV, original photograph, or postcard for display. In this case, it features a CdV of a Seebataillon NCO. The CdV was taken in a Wilhelmshaven photographic shop. The CdV has been bent just below the bayonet at the NCO’s side.
Some of these frames had an easel on the reverse, while others were intended to hang from the wall. I see no evidence of an easel, so it can be hung from the circular device at the anchor’s top. The item is fairly priced according to its faults. $125.00
 
 

 

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13-485 NAVAL FRAME. This is an interesting, silver-toned frame with a naval motif. It comes in the shape of an anchor, with two oars extending through it to serve as its legs. They also further extend the naval motif. In the center is a circular section that replicates a life preserver, and serves as housing for a photograph. The life preserver measures 4 ½" in diameter. It is 6 3/4" wide and 9 1/4" high, respectively. The photo may be loaded into the frame from the rear, where an easel is attached. It is a very handsome, high quality piece. $250.00

 

 

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13-950 ENLISTED MAN’S SCHULFREGATTE HIPPER CAP TALLY. The Schulfregatte Hipper was a post WW II training ship belonging to the (then) West German Navy. Interestingly, it originally was built for the Royal Navy, then was sold to the German Navy for the express purpose of training the slimmed-down German Navy’s sailors.  It has the standard black silk cap tally that measures 57” in length. The vessel’s name is imprinted in gold on the tally. $50.00

 

 

 

 

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13-867 PATRIOTIC NAVY COMPASS/PENDANT. Patriotic items from the Imperial German period never cease to amaze me. Here is something that I have never encountered before now. It is a pendant that measures 1 1/4" x 1 7/8." It is shaped like a naval anchor with the Hohenzollern Crown at the top. At the bottom by the anchor, we find a small compass that measures 9/16" in diameter and still operates! A loop appears on its reverse where a chain or safety pin could secure it. If you are looking for a very different naval piece, this is it! $100.00

 

 

 

 

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13-932  DEUTSCHE FLOTTEN OPFERTAG 1 OCTOBER 1916 BADGE. This is a Deutsche Flotten Opfertag 1 October 1916 Badge. It is a high-quality pin that was created on the occasion of the Deutsche Flotten Opfertag (German Fleet Day of Sacrifice )1 Oktober 1916. The German people were among the most patriotic and generous citizens before, during and after WW I. They were constantly called on to sacrifice or donate money to various causes. For example, when Graf Ferdinand von Zeppelin needed money to build his early zeppelins, he called on the people for help. Fund-driving efforts for airplanes prior to the war used the same tactic. Money was raised for U-Boote and the Navy during WW I. Many such drives actually were directed toward veterans (similar to current efforts in the USA to help fund support for wounded veterans suffering from devastating wounds in Iraq and Afghanistan).
This particular badge is amazing for the simple reason that
it is still complete nearly one-hundred-years later! It consists of a small circular badge (it looks like a life preserver) worked into an anchor. The life preserver’s center features a black Hohenzollern Eagle, with the words "Deutscher Flotten Verien" around its edge. A full-color, paper, kriegsflagge extends from a flagpole attached to the life preserver’s top. On the flag pole we see "Deutsch. Voran."
Printed on the kriegsflagge’s reverse is the information listed below.

"1 Oktober 1916
Opfertag
für die
Deutsche Flotte."

In the life preserver’s center on the reverse we see "Flotten 1916 Spende." At the life preserver’s top and bottom are two pins that allowed the donor to attach the pin to a garment. As delicate as the badge is, I find it amazing that it survived over the years without breaking the overall presentation’s delicate parts. $150.00 

 

 

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13-394 NAVY SEE BATAILLON DESK PIECE. This piece was acquired along with the document holder and photographs described below. The man’s name is Baumeister. He served with See Bataillon Nr III in China early in the 20th Century. The desk piece consists of a wooden plaque measuring 8 7/8" x 9." Affixed to the wooden plaque are several metal implements significant to a man serving in the See Bataillon. A crossed pair of oars lean up against a pike. Spread out in front of the oars are a number of tools (pick, shovel, etc.). In the middle of the tools is a fouled anchor. Directly above the anchor and below the oars is an officer’s cap kokarde. This is a touching display to the man’s service.  $450.00.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-482 NAVY DESK PIECE/ASHTRAY. This is an interesting naval desk piece that could have been used as a display or perhaps as an ashtray. It represents a small caliber naval shell, which swivels up and down as the owner wishes. The bottom of the shell shows that it was produced at the major arsenal at Karlsruhe in May 1886, during the reign of Kaiser Wilhelm I. Thus, this shell casing is 120+ years old. It remains in splendid condition. It is mounted on the aforementioned swivel. The swivel in turn is mounted on a brass plate, which is affixed to a wooden base with four screws. The overall base measures 5 1/8" x 3 1/8." It makes an unusual presentation that is in superb condition. $225.00

 

 

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13-624 NAVY MATROSEN-REGIMENT PATRIOTIC TRENCH ART PIN - ORIGINAL PURCHASE CARD AND PRESENTATION BOX. During WW I, patriotic trench art pins were quite popular. Many of them used driving bands from expended artillery shells. This is a particularly interesting example as it is for a man who served in Navy 2. Matrosen-Regiment during the period of 1914 through1916 as a part of the Marine-Infanterie forces. The gold-toned pin measures 1 1/2." In the pin’s center is a small enamel 1914 Iron Cross with flanking oak leaves and acorns. Atop the pin is a silver-toned bandeau which reads "1914 2. Matrosen-Regiment 1916." The pin is mounted on the original purchase card, which measures 1 1/2" x 2 1/2." The final piece to the ensemble is a cardboard box measuring 1 3/4" x 2 3/4." It holds the entire arrangement. Naval trench art pieces like this are very rare. In my years of collecting I can count the number of Navy pieces on the fingers of one hand, and perhaps have a finger or two left over! $225.00

 

 

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13-657 CONTROL BOX - BRIDGE AREA - UB 59. The UB 59 was a Type-III U-Boot. She was commissioned in August 1917. During her career, she sank a total of seven ships and damaged another two. She made five war patrols during her career. She was attached to Flandern I Flotilla. Her final commander of record was Erwin Waßner (1887-1937), an Oberleutnant zur See. He was an Orden Pour le Mérite winner, which was awarded to him in March 1918 while he commanded UB-59. During the nearly 2 ½ years he commanded U-Boote, Waßner was responsible for sinking EIGHTY-SIX vessels (equal to 150,000 tons). The UB 59 was scuttled on 5 October 1918, when the Germans abandoned Belgian naval operation bases. She was scuttled at Zeebrugge. Her final resting place was at 51.19N and 03.12E. Her wreck was discovered in 2002. A number of parts were removed from her by divers from Belgium.
Today we are offering a control box from the UB 59's bridge area. The box is made of brass. It measures 5 1/4" x 5 ½" x 3 ½." It weighs 7 pounds and 1 ounce. The box has a large handle which permits the box to be opened. On the handle we see the markings "700," "8," a crowned "M," "11," and two tridents. Another crowned "M" appears on the bottom of the box, along with a "B." Four attachments appear where it once was attached to a bulkhead. Another "B" shows near one of these attachments. Its rubber gasket is still present. The box’s interior is empty. Two inlets/outlets show, from which copper wires once extended.
[Extra shipping will be required due to this item’s size and weight]. $995.00

 

 

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13-658 CONTROL BOX - COORDINATING ENGINE POWER - UB 59. The UB 59 was a Type-III U-Boot. She was commissioned in August 1917. During her career, she sank a total of seven ships and damaged another two. She made five war patrols during her career. She was attached to Flandern I Flotilla. Her final commander of record was Erwin Waßner (1887-1937), an Oberleutnant zur See. He was an Orden Pour le Mérite winner, which was awarded to him in March 1918 while he commanded UB-59. During the nearly 2 ½ years he commanded U-Boote, Waßner was responsible for sinking EIGHTY-SIX vessels (equal to 150,000 tons). The UB 59 was scuttled on 5 October 1918, when the Germans abandoned Belgian naval operation bases. She was scuttled at Zeebrugge. Her final resting place was at 51.19N and 03.12E. Her wreck was discovered in 2002. A number of parts were removed from her by divers from Belgium.
Today we are offering a control box that coordinated the UB 59's engine power. The box is made of brass. It measures 6 ½" x 4 1/4" x 3 ½." It weighs 5 pounds and 5 ounces. The box’s top features a plaque with five lines of information. It reads as follows:

B. B. p.p. St. B p.p.
St. B. M III St. B. M. III
B. B. M. H. IV B. B. H. IV
St. B. H. V St.B.H.V
B. B. H. VI B. B. H. VI

The number "13" appears on the edge of the lid, and is repeated on the box’s bottom. Four attachments appear where the box was bolted to a bulkhead. A large hole shows on one side of the box. Two smaller holes appear on two other sides. Two inlets/outlets also are present. The bottom of the box displays a serial number (348187) and a crowned "M" for Marine (Navy). [Extra shipping will be required due to this item’s size and weight]. $995.00

 

 

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13-886 BRASS MACHINERY TAG FROM GERMAN NAVAL VESSEL. This is an interesting brass plaque that once was affixed to a German naval vessel. It is shaped very much like a horseshoe, but is closer to being circular. (It would probably measure about 300 degrees). Stamped onto the surface is the phrase: "Zud. f. Lenzej. Abt. IX XI II v. Hptstrg. Hilfsdpfltg." Three holes appear on the plaque, by which it could have been attached to a bulkhead or other metal surface. $125.00

 

 

 

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13-887 BRASS MACHINERY TAG FROM GERMAN NAVAL VESSEL. This is an interesting brass plaque that once was affixed to a German naval vessel. It is shaped very much like a horseshoe, but is closer to being circular. (It would probably measure about 300 degrees). Stamped onto the surface is the phrase: "Dampfentilk d. Lenz jektors Abt.IX."  Three holes appear on the plaque, by which it could have been attached to a bulkhead or other metal surface. The number 3535 is punched onto the reverse. $125.00

 

 

 

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13-888 OVER SIZED HEAVY DUTY BRASS SCREW FROM NAVAL VESSEL - FASHIONED INTO ASHTRAY. This is a very solid screw or nut from a German naval vessel. It stands 1" tall and measures 5" in diameter. It weighs a very solid 4 lbs. 1 ounce. Notches have been cut into it for the placement of burning cigarettes so it could be used as an ashtray. $75.00

 

 

 

 

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13-791 NAVY COMPASS. This is a very high-quality compass that once steered the course of one of Kaiser Wilhelm’s Kaiserliche Marine vessels. The compass is quite heavy, and weighs 18 lbs. It measures 8 1/4" in diameter at the top and 5 1/2" in diameter at the base. It has a glass top to protect the compass’s inner workings from salt water and other potential problems. It sports a heavy bronze case for further protection. Its fittings and attachments are at the side. The top trim area displays two firms’ names. One is "Carl Bamberg," which is followed by a serial number, No 89170. To its right is an "M," which denotes "Marine" (Navy). To its right is another name, "Berlin Frieden Au." Under the glass are the various compass points, along with 360 degree markings. It floats freely on a pedestal and moves to the appropriate compass point. The compass is FULLY operational. More markings are on the bottom (which we will show in the photographs accompanying the description). This is a wonderful artifact for any Navy collectors. [Due to the item’s weight and size, additional shipping charges will be required - based on your location and needs]. $950.00

 

 

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38-343 LARGE FORMAT DRAWING - ENLISTED MAN - NAVY ARTILLERIE ABTEILUNG. This is a large format drawing of a Navy enlisted man from a Naval Artillerie Abteilung. The drawing measures 15 1/2" x 11 1/2." It is enclosed in a matte measuring 22" x 18." If you look carefully, the man is wearing a two-place medal bar. While the detail is not clear for the medal on the right, the medal on the left is clearly the campaign medal for service in China! This piece is beautifully done. $175.00  

 

 

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13-549  FRAMED PHOTOGRAPH - S. M. S. KAISERIN. It has been a long time since we have offered one of these little beauties. It is a framed photo of a German Navy ship, with the frame in the shape of a life preserver! These were quite popular with German sailors, either for themselves or for their families back home. The frame measures 6" in diameter. The name of the vessel is hand painted on the preserver. Within its confines is a colorized picture of the ship. This one is for the S. M. S. Kaiserin, which was a part of the "Kaiser" Battleship Class. She was commissioned in 1913, then was scuttled at Scapa Flow with the bulk of the German fleet at WW I’s end. $110.00

 

 

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13-336 MINI MEMORIAL TO A SAILOR ON THE S.M.S. UNDINE. This is a small memorial to a sailor who served aboard the S.M.S. Undine. It was made from a small stone. The date "1914" and an Iron Cross are painted on the stone. A mini life preserver serves as a frame, with a photo of the sailor housed within it. This is a really different way to show a sailor and his pride in his service. $185.00.

 

 

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13-534 S.M.S. ILTIS PLM FABRIC WALL PLAQUE. This is a beautifully handcrafted, custom-embossed, fabric, wall plaque of the S.M.S. Iltis. The S.M.S. Iltis was one of the most legendary ships in the Imperial German Navy. The Iltis was a small coastal or river kanonenboot. She was assigned to China before the turn of the 20th Century. She was a part of the German Navy at the time of the Boxer Rebellion. She was involved in an historic river battle in which she fought in a pitched battle against Chinese boats and forts. During this battle the Germans suffered a high level of casualties, including grave wounds to her commander, Wilhelm Lans. Kaiser Wilhelm II was so pleased with the performance of the S. M. S. Iltis that he ordered that Lans and his small vessel be awarded the Orden Pour le Mérite. This was the first (and last) time that a ship was awarded the PLM. She wore a large PLM at her jackstand until she was sunk during WW I. 
This unusual piece is circular, measuring 7 1/4" in diameter. It features a yellow cord trim, followed by two embossed circular frames that set off the interior design. At the top we see "Iltis." In the middle is a gold and blue stylized PLM, without its name imprinted on the decoration’s arms. Below that we see the dates 23 July 1896, which I believe is when the S.M.S. Iltis was assigned to the Chinese station. The other date is 17 June 1900, which was the date of the historic battle.
The piece actually opens into two halves, with a button to secure the two halves. It is a most interesting, historical, and handsome piece.
$450.00

 

 

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13-627 THREE FORKS - OFFICER’S MESS/CASINO - KAISERLICHE-MARINE. This is a captivating three-fork set that comes from a Kaiserliche Marine Offiziers Kasino (officer’s mess). Two of the forks are most unusual. Each one has four tines, with a horizontal bar joining the tips. These forks were used for eating fish! They measure 5 3/4" x 1 1/4." Each fork handle boasts an engraved Hohenzollern Crown. The manufacturer, Gebrüder Hepp, is noted on the reverse. The third fork is much smaller. It is more suitable for an appetizer or a salad, perhaps. It also has four tines and measures 5 3/4" x 3/4." It has the Hohenzollern Eagle on the handle as well. These forks would make a fine addition for a naval display or your own dinner table!  $195.00

 

 

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18-439 SOUP SPOON - NAVAL OFFICER’S MESS - WW I. Today we are offering a high-quality naval officers’ mess soup spoon. The spoon features a marvelous patina that is especially striking in its "bowl." Two distinct patina areas are visible within it. The spoon’s handle displays a decorative design at its midpoint. The handle’s tip reveals a rendition of a 1914 Iron Cross 1st Class that is framed within another decorative display. The handle’s underside features a manufacturer’s hallmark, along with a small anchor. $175.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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18-377 EARLY WAR SMALL DESSERT/BREAD PLATES SALUTING THE KAISERLICHE MARINE. These small white plates measure 5 3/4" in diameter and would have been suitable for use as bread or dessert plates. The plates’ surfaces feature a series of gold flowers around their scalloped edges. In their centers, we see an oval-shaped laurel leaf wreath. Within the wreath is a pair of crossed flags. The German National Flag is on the left, while the Kriegsflagge is on the right. In their center is a fouled anchor. The plates are not hallmarked for their manufacturer. We have a total of three plates. One has a repair on the back that shows through to the front, which we will offer for $30.00. The other two are available for $40.00 each. Or you may take all three for $100.00. 

 

 

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13-120 NAVY ARTILLERIE ASHTRAY. This is a unique stamped metal ash tray that shows a Navy (Marine) artillerie crew in action on the Western Front during WW I. We can clearly tell that this is a Navy crew and not Army because the crew is wearing their mützen, complete with cap tallies! The ashtray measures 4 3/4" x 4 3/4". It is a most interesting item for you Navy collectors. $175.00.

 

 

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13-574 NAVY DESK PIECE - S.M.S. THÜRINGEN. This is a heavy metal desk piece given out by the S.M.S. Thüringen’s builder, Actien - Gesellschaft Wesser. This vessel was a battleship of the S.M.S. Helgoland Class. She was launched in 1911, then scrapped during the period from 1923 to 1933. I cannot tell if this was intended as a gift to somebody within the company, or to a naval officer, perhaps at the staff level. It displays the date December 3, 1910, and Bremen, where the ship was built. What makes this interesting is that the date on the desk piece is the year BEFORE the ship’s formal commissioning. The desk piece measures 6 1/2" x 4" x 1." It shows a fine, high-profile image of the ship. The desk piece is quite substantial, weighing 2 pounds. $275.00  

 

 

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13-331 NAVY COFFEE POT WARMER. When I tell you readers that I seek out the "unusual," I need go no further in explaining this piece! It is a quilted coffee pot warmer, saluting the battleship Schlesien. [I was doing some reading on this vessel today. I was amazed to find that it survived WW I and was actually used by the Kriegsmarine during WW II. It was scuttled in May 1945, near the end of the war.] The piece would wrap around a coffee pot, and help keep the contents warm. It has a small button on the side that would secure it around the pot. The multicolored front half of the warmer has a pleasing profile of the vessel. This would be a marvelous way to dress up your pot of coffee in the morning kitchen, or even at your office! $150.00

 

 

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13-332 PATRIOTIC CLOTH IRON CROSS. I am not sure if this cloth Iron Cross had a purpose or if it was strictly a patriotic piece. Perhaps it was meant to be sewn onto a pillow and someone never got around to it. It measures 8" x 7 1/2." The material appears to be a coarser weave of cotton. It is red with a white and black Iron Cross, measuring 4 1/4" x 4 1/4" in the center. It is in good condition. The EK design is displayed on both sides of the cloth. $75.00 . . .

 

 

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13-444 NAVY-RELATED POCKET KNIFE. This is a small pocket knife that measures 3," closed. It has a black case. On one side are the initials "F & S." On the other side is "Torpedo." I cannot open the blades due to excessive rust. Perhaps spending some time with WD-40® might take care of the problem. It is priced accordingly. It remains quite nice for a display item. $25.00

 

 

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13-463 NAPKIN RING MADE FROM DRIVING BAND OF ARTILLERY SHELL MARKED TO S.M.S. LOTHRINGEN. Napkin rings from the Imperial German period have always been quite interesting and elegant. I have always had an interest in trench art. This example is one of the more unusual that I have seen. It is a section of an artillery shell driving band that has been fashioned into a napkin ring. What makes it even more interesting is that is directly related to the Navy. Etched on the side is the name of the man who probably made this piece, and the name of the vessel S. M. S. Lothringen. The napkin ring is 1 7/8" in diameter and the width is 1 3/4." This piece has lots of character. $110.00 

 

 

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13-734 RING - NAVAL BUTTON. This ring was made from a naval tunic button. The button is gold-toned. It features a crown over a fouled anchor. In looking at the button, I am certain that it is not a German button but from another European country. It may well be English. The button is housed in a silver-toned setting. It is quite ornate. The ring is a size 7 1/4. $95.00

 

 

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Cap Tallies

ALL Navy Cap Tallies 10% Off!!

 

Did you ever wonder why some cap tallies are gold and some are silver? For those sailors who served aboard a ship the cap tallies which are gold were used who served on the "upper deck" as seamen. Silver was used for "lower deck" seamen who worked the technical stations (Engines, work divisions, etc.) aboard ship.

 

Marine-Flieger und Seeflieger - Navy Aviation

 

13-510 ENLISTED MAN CAP TALLY - MARINE-FLIEGER-ABTEILUNG. This is a cap tally for an enlisted man who was assigned to a Marine-Flieger-Abteilung. The tally is black silk. The name of the unit is embossed on it in silver. It is in very good condition. It measures 54" in length. It is always difficult to find cap tallies for naval aviation units. $310.00

 

 

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13-241 ENLISTED MAN CAP TALLY FOR SEEFLIEGER ABTEILUNG II. This is a very fine cap tally to an enlisted man who served in Seeflieger Abteilung Nr 2. This would have been for navy seaplanes that were based along the coast of Germany. It measures 54" in length. The black silk tally has the name of the unit embossed in silver. It is in excellent condition. $295.00

 

 

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13-214 ENLISTED MAN CAP TALLY 2. SEEFLIEGER ABTEILUNG 2. This is an enlisted sailor's cap tally would be for Seeflieger Abteilung II and has silver lettering on the tally. This is for Seaplane Squadron #2.  It is in excellent condition. $295.00

 

 

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Kanonenboote (Cannon Boats)

 

Unterseeboote (U-Boats)

 

 

Linienschiffe/Schlachtschiffe - Battleships

 

 

13-1019 ENLISTED MAN’S S.M.S. RHEINLAND CAP TALLY. This is a cap tally for an enlisted sailor who served aboard the battleship S.M.S. Rheinland, part of the four-ship Nassau Class. This class came into use immediately after the Deutschland Class and represented the beginning of Germany’s modern battleships. She was commissioned in 1910 and scrapped in 1921. She also served at the Battle of Jutland (Skagerrakschlacht) in 1916, where she suffered one hit. The Kaiserliche Marine had other more modern battleships than this vessel, which were sent to be turned over to the British at Scapa Flow. Once they arrived in England, however, their German crews scuttled the ships rather than turn them over to the British.
The commander of the interned ships at Scapa Flow was Konteradmiral Ludwig von Reuter. [Admiral Franz von Hipper and Admiral Reinhard Scheer had refused to participate. Indeed, they were overjoyed when they later received news of the scuttling]. Von Reuter had a difficult situation, since morale among the defeated German sailors was very low. They were still in a fractious mood following their mutiny during WW I’s late stages. [The fleet had been ordered to sail from Kiel to fight the British, but the sailors had refused and mutinied]. The crews on the interned ships were less than happy with their food, recreation, and so on. Finally, on 21 June 1919, von Reuter gave the order to scuttle the fleet. The ships raised the Imperial German battle ensign for the final time (an action that had been prohibited once the fleet reached Scapa Flow). Next, the bulk of the fleet, which included battleships, battle cruisers, cruisers, and destroyers, was scuttled. Some of the ships were refloated in the 1920's and 1930's. Others were raised for scrap during the same time frame. Several ships remain at the bottom to this day, where scuba divers enjoy diving among the wrecks.
The black silk cap tally measures 41" in length. The vessel’s name, S.M.S. Rheinland, is embossed in silver at the front. The cap tally is in very fine condition. $125.00 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-706 ENLISTED MAN CAP TALLY AND POSTCARD OF S.M.S. LOTHRINGEN. This is an enlisted sailor cap tally from the S.M.S. Lothringen and a postcard of the ship. The ship was a Linienschiff, commissioned in 1906. She was a part of the Braunschweig Class, which consisted of five ships. She was obsolete when war broke out in 1914. She performed only minor duties, and was scrapped in 1919. The cap tally is made of black silk and measures 43 1/2" in length. The vessel’s name is embossed in silver. The postcard is in black & white. $125.00

 

 

 

 

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13-976 ENLISTED MAN’S CAP TALLY S. M. S. KAISER WILHELM II. The S. M. S. Kaiser Wilhelm II was a Schlachtschiff (Battleship) of the Kaiser Friedrich III Klasse. She was commissioned in 1900 and served as the fleet flagship until 1906. She was an older ship that saw no major service during WW I, but was used until 1917 in minor roles. She also served as the Fleet Commander’s office ship at Wilhelmshaven until the war’s end. She was scrapped in 1922. The tally is made of black silk and measures 39 ½" in length. A small tear shows at the bottom of Kaiser’s "a." The vessel’s name is embossed on it in silver. $110.00

 

 

 

 

 

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13-1013 ENLISTED MAN’S BATTLESHIP S.M.S. KAISER FRIEDRICH III CAP TALLY. This is a cap tally for an enlisted sailor who served aboard the battleship S.M.S. Kaiser Friedrich III. The Kaiser Friedrich III was the lead ship of a new five-battleship class, and was commissioned in 1898. [Her introduction triggered the arms race between England and Germany that continued until WW I]. The Kaiser Friedrich III had been decommissioned prior to the Great War, but was reinstated and attached to the 5th Battleship Squadron early on. She saw no real service during WW I and was used as a prison ship in 1915. From 1915 through 1917 she was used as a floating barracks at Flensburg. She was broken up in 1920.
The cap tally is made of black silk and measures 45 ½" in length. The vessel’s name is embossed in silver on its front. It is in very fine condition. $125.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-701 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - S.M.S. KAISER FRIEDRICH III. This is an enlisted sailor's cap tally from the S. M. S. Kaiser Friedrich III. The vessel was the lead of the Kaiser Friedrich III Class of Schlachtschiffe. She was commissioned in 1898. She was used for minor operations during WW I, then converted to a prison ship and a floating barracks. She was scrapped in 1920. The cap tally is made of black silk and measures 45 1/2" in length. The vessel’s name is embossed in silver on the tally. The tally is in very fine condition. $125.00

 

 

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13-967 ENLISTED MAN’S S. M. S. POMMERN CAP TALLY. This is a silk cap tally from an enlisted sailor’s mütze aboard the S. M. S. Pommern. The Pommern was a battleship of the Deutschland Class that was commissioned in 1907. She was out-of-date when WW I began and was reduced to a secondary role. She and the other four ships of the Deutschland Class all saw action at the Battle of Jutland (Skagerrak). The S. M. S. Pommern was sunk during the battle, having been struck by one or more torpedoes. The explosion hit a magazine, causing the ship to split in half, and go down with her entire crew of more than 800 men. The black silk tally measures 38" in length. The vessel’s name is embossed in silver on the cap tally. $95.00  

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-968 ENLISTED MAN’S S. M. S. KAISER KARL der GROSSE CAP TALLY. This is a silk cap tally from an enlisted sailor’s mütze aboard the S. M. S. Kaiser Karl der Grosse. The Kaiser Karl der Grosse was a battleship of the Kaiser Friedrich III Class that was commissioned in 1902. She was out-of-date when WW I began and was reduced to a secondary role. She saw patrol service but no combat. Ultimately, she was used as a prison barracks from 1916 through 1918. The black silk tally measures 47" in length. The vessel’s name is embossed in silver on the cap tally. $95.00 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-692 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - S.M.S. HANNOVER. This is an enlisted sailor's cap tally from the S. M. S. Hannover. The vessel was a Linienschiff, commissioned in 1907. She was a part of the Deutsch Class. She served in the Baltic Fleet during WW I, as she was an outmoded ship. She was scrapped during the period of 1944-1946. The cap tally is made of black silk and measures 43 1/2" in length. The vessel’s name is embossed on it in silver. $125.00

 

 

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13-564 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY AND POSTCARD - S. M. S. ELSASS. This is a mini group that consists of a postcard and an enlisted sailor’s cap tally from the S. M. S. Elsass. The Elass was a battleship placed into service during the early 1900's. The cap tally is made of silk and measures 46 ½" in length. "Linienschiff Elsass" is embossed in gold on the cap tally. The postcard shows the ship in a harbor. $125.00

 

 

 

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13-737 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY AND COLOR POSTCARD - S. M. S. ELSASS. This is an enlisted sailor’s cap tally and color postcard from the Kaiserliche Marine. The postcard was actually mailed in 1926. The man served aboard the S. M. S. Elsass, which was a Linienschiff (Ship of the Line) of the Braunschweig Class. At the war’s outbreak, she was deemed obsolete. She was used for coastal defense, as well as a training ship at Kiel. She was ultimately scrapped in 1936. The black silk tally measures 48" in length. The vessel’s name is embossed in gold. The color postcard shows the ship in Wilhelmshaven. The postcard was mailed in 1926. $125.00

 

 

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13-694 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - S.M.S. ELSASS. This is an enlisted sailor's cap tally from the S. M. S. Elsass. She was a Linienschiff, part of the Braunschweig Battleship Class. She was commissioned in 1904. As a more outmoded ship, she was assigned to the Baltic Squadron. She was scrapped in 1936. The cap tally is black silk and measures 47" in length. The vessel’s name is embossed on the tally in gold. $125.00

 

 

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13-564 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY & POSTCARD OF THE LINIENSCHIFF ELSASS. This is an enlisted sailor cap tally and a postcard showing the Linienschiff Elsass. The vessel was a Battleship of the Braunschweig Class. It was commissioned in 1904 and scrapped in 1936. During WW I she served against the Russians in the Baltic. The name of the vessel is embossed in gold on the black silk of the tally. $110.00  

 

 

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13-681 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - S.M.S. KAISER KARL der GROSSE. This is an enlisted man cap tally from the S. M. S. Kaiser Karl der Grosse. She was a Schlachtschiff (Battleship) of the Kaiser Friedrich III Class, commissioned in 1902. She served in the Baltic Fleet early in the war (the area commanded by Kaiser Wilhelm’s younger brother, Großadmiral Prinz Heinrich). As she was an older ship, she was retired from sea duty. She served as a training ship and a ship where crew were housed. The cap tally measures 45 1/2" in length, and is made of black silk. The vessel’s name is embossed in silver on the silk material. $125.00

 

 

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13-591 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - S.M.S. KAISER KARL der GROßE. This is an enlisted sailor cap tally from the S.M.S. Kaiser Karl der Große. This was a battleship of the Friedrich III Class. She was commissioned in 1902, then scrapped in 1920. This is a full-length tally. The vessel’s name is embossed in silver on the black silk tally. $95.00  

 

 

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13-684 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - S.M.S. KAISER WILHELM der GROSSE. This is an enlisted man cap tally from the S. M. S. Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse. She was a Schlachtschiff (Battleship) of the Kaiser Friedrich III Class. She was commissioned in 1901. As she was an older ship, she was retired from sea duty. She served as a training ship and a ship where crew were housed. The cap tally measures 45" in length. It is made of black silk. The vessel’s name is embossed in silver on the silk material. $125.00

 

 

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13-661 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY  AND POSTCARD OF S.M.S. HELGOLAND. This is an enlisted man's cap tally from the S. M. S. Helgoland and a postcard of the battleship. The Helgoland was the lead ship in the Helgoland Class of Schlachtschiffe (Battleships). She was commissioned in 1911, and served at the Battle of Jutland (Skagerrak). The cap tally is made of black silk. The vessel’s name is embossed in silver. The postcard is in color.  $140.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-1030 CAP TALLY AND POSTCARD - ENLISTED MAN’S - S.M.S. NASSAU. The S.M.S. Nassau was a Schlachtschiff (Battleship) of her self-named class. She was commissioned in 1909 and assigned to Battleship Squadron Nr I, along with her three sister ships. She served at the Battle of Jutland, wherein she was hit three times by British gunfire. The black silk cap tally measures 46" in length. The vessel’s name is embossed on it in silver. Three pinpoint holes in its silk indicate it may have been attached to a flat surface for display. Other than that, the tally is in fine condition.
We are pairing a color postcard of the S.M.S. Nassau with its cap tally. The postcard depicts the ship steaming at sea. The vessel’s name appears in its upper left corner. The ship’s technical specifications appear on the reverse. The postcard is in mint condition and has never been mailed.
$150.00   

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-568 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY AND POSTCARD OF S.M.S. NASSAU. This is an enlisted sailor's cap tally from the S.M.S. Nassau and a postcard of the battleship. This is NOT a full-length tally. It measures 26 3/4" in length. It does, however, show the complete name of the vessel in silver on the black silk material. A profile view of the ship is seen on the accompanying postcard. $80.00

 

 

 

 

 

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13-663 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - S.M.S. SCHWABEN. This is an enlisted man cap tally for the S. M. S. Schwaben. The Schwaben was a Linienschiff (Ship of the Line) commissioned in 1904. She was a part of the Wittelsbach Class. When WW I began in 1914, the ship was outmoded. It was used for assorted fleet training and support missions. The cap tally is made of black silk. The vessel’s name is embossed in gold. The vessel’s name is much lighter than we generally see due to age and use. It measures 47 1/4" in overall length. $115.00

 

 

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13-639 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - S.M.S. SCHWABEN. This is an enlisted man cap tally from the S.M.S. Schwaben. The vessel was a Linienschiff (Ship of the Line) of the Wittelsbach Class. She was commissioned in 1904. The cap tally measures 40." It has the name of the vessel embossed on it in silver. The cap tally is in excellent condition. $125.00

 

 

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13-665 UNISSUED ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - S.M.S. WITTELSBACH. This is an enlisted man cap tally from the S.M.S. Wittelsbach. The Wittelsbach was a Linienschiff. It was the leading ship of her (self-named) class, commissioned in 1902. This tally was never issued. It comes complete with its original packing tissue. The tally is made of black silk, with its vessel’s name embossed in gold. The tally measures 49 3/4" in overall length. $160.00

 

 

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13-927 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - S. M. S. WITTELSBACH. This is an enlisted sailor’s cap tally for the S. M. S. Wittelsbach, a battleship that was commissioned in 1902. She served early in WW I against the Russians. The cap tally is made of black silk. The vessel’s name is embossed in silver on the tally. The tally measures 45 ½" in length. A postcard of the S. M. S. Wittelsbach is included. $135.00
 

 

 

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13-554 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - S.M.S. WÜRTTEMBERG. This is a cap tally for an enlisted sailor who served aboard the S.M.S. Württemberg. The vessel was a battleship. She was a part of the Bayern Class of battleships. This was the final class of battleships that were designed and built during WW I. Four ships were in the class. Two were completed and saw service during WW I. This vessel was still under construction when the war ended and saw no service. The S.M.S. Bayern and S.M.S. Baden were completed and saw service during the war. The fourth vessel in the class was the S.M.S. Sachsen, which was also not completed. It was scrapped in 1921. The name of the vessel is embossed in gold on the silk ribbon. $90.00  

 

 

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13-664 UNISSUED ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - S.M.S. SACHSEN. This is an enlisted man's cap tally from the S. M. S. Sachsen. The Sachsen was a Schlachtschiff (Battleship).  She was a part of the Bayern Class of battleships. This was the final class of battleships that were designed and built during WW I. The S.M.S. Bayern and S.M.S. Baden were completed and saw service during the war. The fourth vessel in the class, the S.M.S. Württemberg, was also not completed and was scrapped in 1921. This tally was never issued. It comes completes with its original packing tissue. The tally is made of black silk, with its vessel’s name embossed in gold. The tally measures 51 ½" in overall length. $160.00

 

 

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13-985 ENLISTED MAN’S CAP TALLY FROM BATTLESHIP S. M. S. BRAUNSCHWEIG. The S. M. S. Braunschweig was the lead ship of the Braunschweig Battleship Class. She was commissioned in 1904 and was obsolete before WW I began. She saw minor duty as a coastal defense ship and served in the Baltic. She was later relegated to a training ship and barracks ship. She remained in the Reichsmarine after WW I due to her age and size. The cap tally measures 40" in length. The vessel’s name is embossed in silver on the silk tally. It is perfect for display. $95.00    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-563 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - S.M.S. BRAUNSCHWEIG. This is an enlisted sailor's cap tally from the S.M.S. Braunschweig. The S.M.S. Braunschweig was a Battleship. She was commissioned in 1904 and scrapped in 1932. The name of the vessel is embossed in silver on the black silk material. $90.00  

 

 

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Großer Kreuzer - Heavy Cruiser

 

13-678 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - S.M.S. HANSA. This is an enlisted sailor's cap tally from the S.M.S. Hansa. The ship was a Großer Kreuzer of the Viktoria Luise Class. She was commissioned in 1899. By the time WW I began she was outmoded. She reverted to training, and also was used as a floating barracks. She survived the war. The black silk tally measures 45 1/2" in length. The vessel’s name is embossed in silver. $125.00

 

 

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13-557 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - S.M.S. KAISERIN AUGUSTA. This is a cap tally for an enlisted sailor who served on the S.M.S. Kaiserin Augusta. The ship was named after the wife of Kaiser Wilhelm II, Augusta Viktoria. It was a Großer Kreuzer. The ship spent five years in the East Asian squadron. She was in reserve status at the beginning of WW I and did not see any real service. She was scrapped in 1920 in Kiel. The silk tally has the name of the vessel embossed on it in gold. $80.00  

 

 

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13-736 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - S.M.S. FRIEDRICH CARL. This is an enlisted sailor's cap tally from the Kaiserliche Marine. The man served aboard the S.M.S. Friedrich Carl. The vessel was a Großer Kreuzer, part of the Prinz Adalbert Class of Heavy Cruisers. The vessel was commissioned in 1903. She was sunk by mines on 17 November 1914. The cap tally measures 46" in length. The vessel’s name is embossed in silver. $125.00

 

 

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Kleiner Kreuzer - Light Cruiser

 

13-1009 XLL ENLISTED MAN’S S. M. S. KARLSRUHE CAP TALLY. This is a consignment item. It is a cap tally for an enlisted sailor who served aboard the S. M. S. Karlsruhe. She was a Kleiner Kreuzer that was commissioned in 1914. She operated in the Caribbean as a Commerce Raider and sank some seventeen ships. She later exploded near Trinidad while transferring supplies.
The ship’s name is embossed in silver on the tally’s silk material, which was then placed around the man’s mütze. It measures 38" in length. $125.00 2nd PRICE REDUCTION: $95.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13-716 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - S.M.S. HELA. This is a cap tally that was worn on an enlisted sailor’s mütze from the S.M.S. Hela. The vessel was commissioned in 1896 as a Light Cruiser. She served in China during the Boxer Rebellion, 1900-1901. She was refitted in 1910 as a fleet tender. She was sunk by an English submarine in 1914. The cap tally is made of black silk and measures 47” in length. The vessel’s name is embossed in gold on its front. $150.00

 

 

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13-680 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - S.M.S. STRALSUND. This is an enlisted sailor's cap tally from the S.M.S. Stralsund. This ship was a Kleiner Kreuzer of the Magdeburg Class. She was commissioned in 1912. She participated in the Battle of Helgoland and the Battle of Doggerbank. The black silk tally measures 46" in length. The vessel’s name is embossed in gold. $125.00

 

 

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13-674 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - S.M.S. MÜNCHEN. This is an enlisted sailor’s cap tally from the S.M.S. München (Munich). The ship was a Kleiner Kreuzer (Light/Small Cruiser) that was part of the Bremen Class. She was placed in service in 1905. She served at the Battle of Jutland (Skagerrak). The tally measures 46 1/2" in length. It has a very small tear, about 1/4" in length. The vessel’s name is embossed on it in silver. $125.00

 

 

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Miscellaneous Ships

 

 

13-972 S. M. S. CHARLOTTE CADET’S CAP TALLY. This is a partial cadet/enlisted-sailor-in-training’s S. M. S. Charlotte cap tally. The vessel was classified as a Cruiser Frigate, and was commissioned in 1886. She was propelled by a single boiler and a single propeller, but also had the use of three masts and a sail system. She essentially was outdated at the time of her commissioning, and soon was relegated to use as a training ship. She had a crew of some five hundred men before she was turned over to the training squadron in 1893, where she carried far fewer men. She served with a combination of training missions and some secondary military missions where a first line warship was not needed.
The silk cap tally measures 27 ¼." The vessel’s name is embossed in red
(denoting its training ship status) on the tally’s front. Although it is only a partial cap tally, it is fine for display. Red tallies from training vessels seldom turn up. $75.00

 

 

 

 

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13-890 ENLISTED MEN'S S.M.S. SCHNEEWITTCHEN CAP TALLY. This is a cap tally worn on enlisted sailors’ mützen. The S.M.S. Schneewittchen was a Torpedoboot that entered service in the Kaiserliche Marine during 1888. By the turn of the century she was removed from front-line service and used as a yacht for the Baltic Seas Fleet in Kiel. As she was a relatively small vessel (a crew of less than twenty men) few of the mützen worn by the crew survived. It is a rare cap tally for an interesting ship. The cap tally is made of black silk and measures 33" in length. The vessel’s name is embossed in gold on the tally. $195.00

 

 

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13-885 ENLISTED SAILORS' CAP TALLY FROM S.M.S. SCHNEEWITTCHEN. This is an enlisted men’s cap tally for the S.M.S. Schneewittchen (Snow White). The Schneewittchen originally was built as a torpedoboot in 1888. At some point, she was converted to a yacht for the Navy’s Baltic Station, and renamed the S.M.S. Schneewittchen.  The cap tally is black and has the vessel’s name embossed on it in gold. The cap tally’s length is 38." As it was a small vessel with a relatively small crew, few of these cap tallies remain in existence. The example is in very fine condition. $150.00

 

 

 

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13-662 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - S.M.S. HEIMDALL. This is an enlisted men's cap tally for the S.M.S. Heimdall. The Heimdall was a Küstenpanzer (Coastal Defense Ship). She was commissioned in 1894, and was obsolete by the time WW I broke out. She was used as a floating barracks for sailors assigned to U-Boats. The cap tally is made of black silk. The vessel’s name is embossed in gold. This is not a full-length tally. $115.00

 

 

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13-682 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - S.M.S. CAROLA. This is an enlisted men's cap tally from the S.M.S. Carola. Finding information on this ship took a bit more digging, as she was commissioned in 1881 during Kaiser Wilhelm I’s reign. She was a Corvette (a smaller vessel) and was used in seas across the world. She was unusual because her guns were mounted under the deck rather than on top. [If you are familiar with some earlier sailing warships, this once was standard practice. A Ship-of-the-Line, for example, had one, sometimes two, decks of guns below the main deck]. She was scrapped in 1906, after having been used in the 1890's as a training and gunnery ship. The cap tally measures 58" in length. It is made of black silk. The vessel’s name is embossed in gold on the silk material. $150.00

 

 

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13-895 SAILOR’S CAP TALLY FROM CIVILIAN VESSEL DEUTSCHLAND. This is an interesting post WW I cap tally for the civilian or merchant ship Deutschland. The black silk tally has the vessel’s name embossed on it in gold. Flanking Deutschland are two Imperial German kriegsflagges. The cap tally measures 41 ½" in length. $75.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Miscellaneous Cap Tallies (Non Ship Specific)

 

13-800 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - SCHIFFSJUNGEN =DIVISION. This is a cap tally that was displayed on enlisted sailors' mützen. The cap tally’s front displays the ship or unit in which a sailor served. It wrapped all the way around the mütze so its two tails hung down the wearer’s back. This particular cap tally is actually quite rare. The tally is made of black silk. It measures 47 1/2" in length. Embossed in RED is Schiffsjungen=Division. It was for a young cadet still in training. Literally, Schiffsjungen means "Ship’s Boys." The red embossing is quite unusual, which is what makes the tally so interesting. The tally is unissued. It comes in its original tissue paper, which has protected the tally well after all these years. $150.00

 

 

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13-427 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY FOR XI. HALBFLOTTILLE. This cap tally is for an enlisted sailor who served in the XI. Halbflottille (Half Flotilla). This unit was a smaller and more compact flotilla that would most likely have been under the command of a Kapitän zur See or possibly a Konteradmiral. The tally is made of silk and is full length. The legend XI. Halbflottille XI. Is embossed in gilt on the tally. The lettering is somewhat faded from age. $75.00.

 

 

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13-621 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - 1887 JUBELFEIER II. TORPEDO-DIVISION 1912. This is an enlisted sailors' cap tally for the II. Torpedo-Division. It was a special commemorative cap tally that was issued to the unit’s men for the 25th anniversary of the II. Torpedo-Division’s establishment. It covered the period of 1887 to 1912, as stated on the cap tally. The tally is made of black silk. The information for the Jubilee appears on the tally embossed in gold. The cap tally measures 42 1/2." $80.00

 

 

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13-604 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY - A. 1. II WERFT=DIVISION. This is an enlisted sailor black silk cap tally from the A.1. II. Werft=Division. Embossed in silver on the cap tally is A. 1. II. Werft=Division II. A. 1. The tally measures 45 1/2" in length. It is in very fine condition. $115.00  

 

 

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13-206 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY 1. HALBFLOTTILLE. 1. This yet another cap tally for enlisted men. The legend of 1.Halbflotille.1. Is in gold. The tally is in very fine condition.  $60.00

 

 

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13-308 ENLISTED MEN'S CAP TALLY FOR X. HALBFLOTTILLE. X. This is a Navy cap tally for X. Halbflottille X. The unit name appears in faded gilt embossing on the tally. $75.00.

 

 

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13-896 SAILOR’S CAP TALLY FROM H.A.P.A.G. SHIPPING LINE’S VESSEL. This is an interesting post WW I cap tally for H.A.P.A.G., the civilian shipping line. The black silk tally has the shipping-line’s name embossed on it in gold. The cap tally measures 32" in length. $50.00

 

 

 

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13-921 XBG COLOGNE-DUSSELDORF STEAMSHIP HINDENBURG CAP TALLY. This is a consignment item. It is a cap tally for a crewman aboard the steamship that served Cologne and Dusseldorf. The cap tally measures 36 ½" in length. To the left in embossed gold we see "Köln-Düsseldorfer Rheindampfschiffahrt" (Steamship serving Cologne and Dusseldorf on the Rhine). In the center we see the multicolored steamship-line’s pennant. To the pennant’s right, also embossed in gold, is its name, "Hindenburg." All of this is on a black silk tally that is in excellent condition. $50.00

 

 

 

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13-897 SAILOR’S CAP TALLY FROM CIVILIAN VESSEL HINDENBURG. This is an interesting post WW I cap tally for the civilian ship Hindenburg. The blue silk tally has the vessel’s name embossed on it in gold. Flanking Hindenburg is an Imperial German kriegsflagge and a German national flag. The cap tally measures 34 1/4" in length. $75.00

 

 

 

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13-30 NAVY MEDICAL ARMBAND. A very nice Medical Arm Band. It measures 5 ½’ x 7" and is black and I would say that it is made of a fine quality cotton. It has double horizontal embroidered stripes that have rows of various colored lines. In between those two stripes is the universally known symbol for medicine of a staff and an intertwined snake. This device is embroidered silver bullion. The entire armband is in excellent condition and would be a wonderful addition to a Naval tunic or just to a general collection. $195.00

 

 

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28-145 KRIEGSFLAGGE STICKPINS. These kriegsflagge stickpins have proven to be very popular.  I am able to offer these for $10.00 each or three for $25.00.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Books

 

All Books Below are 10% Off!!

 

13-954 UNSERE MARINE im WELTKRIEG 1914-1918.  This exciting book deals with WW I’s Kaiserliche Marine and is long out-of-print. The massive book measures 10 ½" x 14" x 2." It also weighs a whopping 9 pounds and 4 ounces! Before you even open it, you can see that its spine is made of handsome, hand-tooled black Moroccan leather. The book’s title is printed in gold leaf on both the front cover and the spine. All its pages are trimmed in gold, with gold printing and decorative illustrations on its end pages. You just do not see books today with this kind of visual presentation. The content of this German-language book is equally impressive. It was published in 1926, just eight years after WW I’s end. Its introduction is by Vizeadmiral a. D. Eberhard von Mantey.
The book is liberally illustrated with photos and drawings of the Navy’s key leaders during the war, including Großadmiral Alfred von Tirpitz, Großadmiral Prince Heinrich, Großadmiral Hans von Koester, Admiral von Capelle, Admiral von Pöhl, Admiral von Ingenhol, Admiral Scheer (final commander of the High Seas Fleet), etc. The photographs of the ships are magnificent, with several color plates of the Navy’s ships. I find it particularly interesting that it contains so many previously unpublished photographs, and photographs that have surfaced again since the book was first published in 1926. For example, it contains fascinating photographs depicting the German sailor at work on his ship in everyday tasks like swabbing the decks and securing a lifeboat.
It has extensive coverage of WW I’s biggest naval engagement, the Battle of Jutland (Skagerrak to the Germans). Charts and a fabulous two-page map show the battle’s action. Yet another marvelous one-page map shows how important the battle was to the German side. Victory was claimed by both the Germans and the English (naturally, the book names Germany the victor)! Kaiser Wilhelm II was especially pleased with the outcome and awarded Vizeadmiral Hipper the Pour le Mérite. [The latter also was knighted by the King of Bavaria, and was hence known as Admiral von Hipper].
Another chapter details Germany’s Kreuzer Geschwader, and features superb two-page foldout maps depicting the voyages of the S. M. S. Emden, S. M. S. Karlsruhe, the S. M. S. Königsberg, S. M. S. Scharnhorst, and S. M. S. Gneisenau. A different chapter covers the Battle of Dogger Bank, which took place on 24 January 1915. The German commander in this battle was Vizeadmiral von Hipper, leading his Cruiser Squadron. Other sections discuss the U-Boot Service, fixed-wing naval aviation and zeppelins. This book will afford you hours of research about WW I’s Kaiserliche Marine. $895.00  

 

 

 

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13-809 DIE FAHRT DER DEUTSCHLAND von PAUL KÖNIG. This is a small-format, soft cover book that measures 6 ½" x 4 1/4" x ½." The German-language book was published in 1916. It deals with one of WW I’s most unusual ships. Although the U-Deutschland was a submarine, she was not a military submarine. She was built as a cargo ship after WW I began to transport goods from neutral countries that still traded with Germany. She submerged when she neared Germany to avoid the British blockade of German ports. Actually, TWO such vessels were built. The other was the Bremen. The Deutschland was commanded by Paul König, the book’s author. In looking through the book we see that it was published in Berlin. (It is also interesting to note that the American publishing rights were held by William Randolph Hearst)! In addition to being written in German, it is printed in German Fraktur, which can be a bit tricky to decipher. It can take awhile to become comfortable with it. The book has many interesting photographs of the Deutschland’s interior and exterior. Her first transatlantic voyage was to Baltimore, MD in July 1916. (The book was published shortly thereafter). As the U.S. was not yet at war with Germany, she was welcomed in Baltimore. Her visit was considered a major event. The officers and crew were welcomed with open arms, especially by Baltimore’s German-American citizens, who invited the crew members into their homes. During the historic visit, and as an expression of friendship, the crew and Baltimore’s citizens exchanged gifts. The book is both a patriotic reminiscence AND an exercise in propaganda. $95.00

 

 

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13-113 DER U-BOOT KRIEG by LORD JELLICOE. Another book originally written in English as The Submarine Peril that was translated into German in the 1930's. The author was Lord Jellicoe, the noted English Admiral and Commander of the English fleet at The Battle of Jutland. The book is illustrated and has interesting tables that show the concern and respect that senior Royal Navy admirals had for the threat presented by U-Boote. $40.00

 

 

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13-611 SEEMANNSHAUS BOOK. This is a very interesting book. The Seemannshaus was a place for sailors to congregate when not on duty. [During WW II, America’s USO maintained similar places where soldiers, sailors, marines, and airmen spent their off-duty time. Often young women were present as hostesses and talked with the men, to remind them why they were fighting]! This fascinating book has photographs of the houses in various countries (the one in China, for example). Photos of sailors passing their time, and the house interiors are shown. It is a rare, soft-cover book. $150.00

 

 

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