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Germany – Postcard – Hans Von Koster – Autographed – Großadmirals Kaiserliche Marine

Germany – Postcard – Hans Von Koster – Autographed – Großadmirals Kaiserliche Marine

We recently acquired a large collection of signed postcards, private photos, letters, etc. of German Admirals, Generals, etc. Many of these items were acquired by a single collector who would write to the subject and receive in return a signed photograph, postcard, letter. Etc. The name of this collector was Paul Baer and his name appears on many of the items offered….

 

Germany – Postcard – Wilhelm Von Lans – Autographed – Kaiserliche Marine

Germany – Postcard – Wilhelm Von Lans – Autographed – Kaiserliche Marine

We recently acquired a large collection of signed postcards, private photos, letters, etc. of German Admirals, Generals, etc. Many of these items were acquired by a single collector who would write to the subject and receive in return a signed photograph, postcard, letter. Etc. The name of this collector was Paul Baer and his name appears on many of the items offered….

Germany – Postcard and Letter – Max Looff – Autographed – Kapitain zur See – Kaiserliche Marine

Germany – Postcard and Letter – Max Looff – Autographed – Kapitain zur See – Kaiserliche Marine

We recently acquired a large collection of signed postcards, private photos, letters, etc. of German Admirals, Generals, etc. Many of these items were acquired by a single collector who would write to the subject and receive in return a signed photograph, postcard, letter. Etc. The name of this collector was Paul Baer and his name appears on many of the items offered….

 

GERMANY – SCHIRMMÜTZE – OFFICER – KAISERLICHE MARINE FOR OVERSEAS SERVICE

GERMANY – SCHIRMMÜTZE – OFFICER – KAISERLICHE MARINE FOR OVERSEAS SERVICE

It has been ages since we have been able to offer you an Imperial German Navy officer schirmmütze. And today we offer one that IS very special. In fact I have only seen ONE other example and it was in much poorer condition than our offering. It is an officer schirmmütze for use in overseas service. This would have been used in tropical possessions like China, Africa, the South Seas, etc…..

PRUSSIA – FLAG – KRIEGSFLAGGE – KAISERLICHE MARINE SHIP WITH A PARTIAL FLAGSTAFF

PRUSSIA – FLAG – KRIEGSFLAGGE – KAISERLICHE MARINE SHIP WITH A PARTIAL FLAGSTAFF

FLAG – KRIEGSFLAGGE – KAISERLICHE MARINE SHIP WITH A PARTIAL FLAGSTAFF

We have offered Kriegsflagges in the past, including Naval Kriegsflagges. Today, for the first time ever, we are offering something a bit different, a Kaiserliche Marine Kriegsflagge with a partial flagstaff.

The Kriegsflagge itself measures 15” x 24,” while the partial flagstaff measures 28” in length. The flagstaff has all the necessary hardware for tying off the flag from its halyard with the attached ropes.

The Kriegsflagge features an “M” for Marine (Navy) and the date, “1915,” on its bunting. Since the Kriegsflagge and its flagstaff are both small in size, it clearly hails from a smaller vessel. The Kriegsflagge is in generally good condition. One area does exhibit some slight wear, which have detailed in the attached photographs

PAPER STAMP FOR CRUISER SQUADRONS’ COMMANDING OFFICER – KAISERLICHE MARINE

PAPER STAMP FOR CRUISER SQUADRONS’ COMMANDING OFFICER – KAISERLICHE MARINE

PAPER STAMP FOR CRUISER SQUADRONS’ COMMANDING OFFICER – KAISERLICHE MARINE.

The Imperial German Navy employed a combination of rubber and paper stamps that were applied to all sorts of documents, letters, envelopes, etc. This is one of the paper versions. It measures 1.5” in diameter, and sports a combination of blue and white colors. Its center displays a Hohenzollern Eagle superimposed over an anchor, with the words “Kaiserl. Marine Kommando des Kreuzergeschwaders” surrounding it around the edge. The Kaiserliche Marine had a heavy concentration of heavy and light cruisers that constituted an important section of the High Seas Fleet. For example, cruisers made up the biggest part of the East Asian Squadron (commanded by Maximilian Graf von Spee). [None of the latter survived the actions in the Indian Ocean or at the Battle of Falkland Islands). Also, at the Battle of Jutland (Skageraak), Franz von Hipper and his Cruiser Squadron saved the German fleet from disaster by covering the battleships’ withdrawal from action. Von Hipper’s combination of heavy and light cruisers were very mobile and effective and his actions gained him a Pour le Mérite and a Military Max Joseph Order and a Knighthood as a result of the battle.

The stamp is in excellent condition.

SHIP’S MESSENGER LAMP – KAISERLICHE MARINE

SHIP’S MESSENGER LAMP – KAISERLICHE MARINE

SHIP’S MESSENGER LAMP – KAISERLICHE MARINE.

This is a consignment item. Here is one of the more interesting items for you naval enthusiasts, a messenger lamp from aboard a Kaiserliche Marine ship. Officially christened a Petroleum Schiffslampe (Petroleum Ship’s Lamp), Kaiserliche Marine, Messing mit Glas (Brass with Glass), it dates from approximately 1900. It is made of a combination of brass and glass. The handle at its top swings up and down, allowing it to be carried by hand. The lamp’s body is constructed of the highest-quality brass, as was required aboard a navy ship (brass being preferred, since it resists rusting). With the handle extended the lamp stands an impressive 22” (55.88 cm) tall. The circumference at the widest point measures 21 ” (53.34 cm). A vertical bracket/handle at its side, which measures 12”tall (30.48 cm), allowed the lamp to be attached to a bulkhead in a fixed position via a rivet or other metal attachment. The lamp weighs approximately 5 lbs. and 8 ounces, overall. [NOTE: I have seen only one similar lamp, but it was considerably smaller, standing 30 cm tall instead of this lamp’s impressive 55.88 cm].
As previously mentioned, the lamp used a petroleum-based fuel. Several mesh areas built into the brass allowed the heat and gas to escape. A brass cage encases a clear white glass section from which the gas flame’s light was emitted. As a matter of fact, it comes with a second glass section in case its original glass cover is shattered.
How do we know that this item was actually from a Kaiserliche Marine vessel? We return to the previously mentioned long vertical bracket/handle attached to its side. The three engraved lines that appear on the handle’s interior side (listed below) attest to that fact.

Line 1: “M” beneath a Kaiser Crown, the symbol for Kaiserliche Marine.
Line 2: An “AW” or “AN” followed by a “W.”
Line 3: The numeral “12.”

These engravings are quite clear, as you will note from the photographs that accompany this description. This is a most impressive display item. [Due to its size and weight, extra shipping charges will be necessary].

SLEEVE PATCH – FLIEGER FLUGMAAT – KAISERLICHE MARINE

SLEEVE PATCH – FLIEGER FLUGMAAT – KAISERLICHE MARINE

SLEEVE PATCH – FLIEGER FLUGMAAT – KAISERLICHE MARINE.

This is an amazingly rare sleeve patch for an enlisted man/NCO (Flugmaat) attached to a naval aviation unit. It was worn on a dress tunic’s sleeve. It is oval-shaped and measures 3 ½” x 4 ¼.” It features a brass anchor against a navy-blue wool background. A red enameled propeller that measures 2 ½” in length sits across the anchor’s width. The patch’s reverse displays a canvas backing.
The patch dates to 1915 and is VERY rare. I have never seen another, much less had the opportunity to acquire it. Aviation material is hard to find these days, while material from the Kaiserliche Marine’s aviation units is nearly impossible to find, with the exception of an occasional Navy Flight Badge. This is the first such badge that we have encountered. We are quite pleased to share it with you. It would make for a fine addition to any aviation collection.

PRUSSIA – ARM CHEVRON – ONE YEAR VOLUNTEER – KAISERLICHE MARINE

PRUSSIA – ARM CHEVRON – ONE YEAR VOLUNTEER – KAISERLICHE MARINE

This is a One-Year-Volunteer’s arm chevron from the Kaiserliche Marine. As we have chronicled elsewhere, the One-Year-Volunteer (OYV) entered the German military service on a different program from the men doing two-year mandatory service. After most men completed their two-year service, they entered the reserves. They only were called to active service when additional man power was needed. This was the situation, of course, when WW I began. Most reserves were called back to active duty. Returning to the OYV, when entering the military, they essentially paid all of their own expenses. That is, the government did not pay for their equipment (uniforms, headgear, etc.). They were expected to supply their own gear, just as officers did. Since these men provided their own gear, they were allowed a certain amount of latitude in their uniforms and headgear. Men who enlisted in the OYV program were generally from the German middle class or higher. They had more money to spend on their uniforms than say farmers who came into the service. Many OYV’s bought their uniforms and headdress from the same purveyors that the officers did. They were allowed to mimic many officers’ headdress characteristics. For example, they were not allowed to purchase a pickelhaube EXACTLY like an officer’s, but they could get VERY close. At least ONE of the details had to be different from an officer’s. It is common to see a silk liner and officer’s leather liner on an OYV’s pickelhaube. This was one of the extra allowances that OYV’s were allowed to make. They also were allowed to wear a special trim on their shoulder straps that clearly indicated they were an OYV, not a normal enlistee, or even an NCO. I cannot state with authority that Navy OYV’s wore the trim on their shoulder straps. This device, however, serves the same purpose. It was worn on the sleeve. Each “V” shaped arm measures 3 1/2.” Woven into the patch is a design of red, black, and white. This is the first time that I have run across one.

PRUSSIA – UNIFORM BOTTONS – NAVY – SILVER-TONED  – KAISERLICHE MARINE

PRUSSIA – UNIFORM BOTTONS – NAVY – SILVER-TONED – KAISERLICHE MARINE

These are silver-toned uniform buttons for an enlisted sailor’s tunic. The buttons measure 1/2″ in diameter. They are the larger sized that ran down a tunic’s center, NOT the smaller size used on the sleeves. The buttons have a frosted finish and bear the Kaiserliche Marine’s crowned, fouled anchor. We have a total of twenty-four buttons in the following quantities, with a variety of markings on the reverse.

ONLY 17 LEFT!

* Nine are marked “Extra Fein.”
* Four are marked “Hochfeine Qualität.”
* Four are marked “Ger. Ehlers – Kiel.”
* One is marked “J&S Winns Sueine – Ludenscheid.”
* Six are unmarked, with very short shanks.

It has been some time since we have offered Navy buttons. They typically sell very quickly. This is a good opportunity to pick up a few for future needs or to replace a tunic’s missing button.

PRUSSIA – EPAULETTES – OBERLEUTNANT – zur SEE OF THE KAISERLICHE MARINE – ORIGINAL STORAGE BOX

PRUSSIA – EPAULETTES – OBERLEUTNANT – zur SEE OF THE KAISERLICHE MARINE – ORIGINAL STORAGE BOX

Epaulettes from the Kaiserliche Marine are very hard-to-find. The dress or “banjo” epaulettes are even more so. Add to the mix a pair of dress epaulettes that come in their original storage box and you have a very rare example of an epaulette! The examples we are offering today are for an Oberleutnant zur See. An Oberleutnant zur See is equivalent to an Oberleutnant in the German Army, a 1st Lieutenant in the U.S. Army, or a Lieutenant in the U.S. Navy. These epaulettes are massive. They display a combination of gold and silver embroidered bullion on the obverse. Each displays a fouled anchor highlighted in the center of a gold field. The anchors have a marvelous patina to them and are quite striking. Each epaulette has the individual rope-like (ringlets) gold bullion hanging down. Also each epaulette exhibits a gilt button for the Kaiserliche Marine, with anchor and crown. Underneath, the epaulettes have a dark-blue or purple lining, along with the brass attachments that clip them to the tunic. The deluxe storage box is made of black leatherette. Inside is a pedestal on which the epaulettes are tied and mounted. Also, a pillow is cut to the shape of the box and laid over the epaulettes to protect them from any damage. This is a truly stunning pair of epaulettes.

ENLISTED KAISERLICHE MARINE SAILOR’S PROMOTION PATENT

ENLISTED KAISERLICHE MARINE SAILOR’S PROMOTION PATENT

This is an interesting promotion patent for an enlisted Kaiserliche Marine sailor. He was promoted to a Machinist 2nd Class effective 23 December 1918, some six weeks after WW I ended! The handwritten document measures 8 ¼” x 11 ¼,” and was issued to a man whose last name was Rettick. It shows he served aboard Torpedo Boots S 247 and S 210. The promotion was actually approved prior to 11 November 1918, but apparently took awhile to wend its way through the Kaiserliche Marine’s bureaucracy.

PAIR OF KAPITÄN zur SEE SHOULDER BOARDS – KAISERLICHE MARINE

PAIR OF KAPITÄN zur SEE SHOULDER BOARDS – KAISERLICHE MARINE

In the Kaiserliche Marine, a Kapitän zur See was a rank equivalent to that of an Army Oberst (Colonel). Typically, a Kapitän zur See commanded a battleship, or a squadron of smaller ships. Such a high rank meant that the Navy had only a few men bearing it at any given time. We are exceedingly pleased to be offering a Kapitän zur See’s shoulder boards today. They sport the twisted silver bullion braid seen on field-grade officers’ shoulder boards. Black chevrons grace the silver bullion. The boards also display twin, gilt-toned pips denoting the rank. The reverse displays the purple/dark-blue backing indicative of naval shoulder boards. The very handsome shoulder boards belong to the slip-on variety.

PAIR OF EPAULETTES FOR AN OBERSTABSINGENIEUR – KAISERLICHE MARINE

PAIR OF EPAULETTES FOR AN OBERSTABSINGENIEUR – KAISERLICHE MARINE

This is a first-rate pair of naval epaulettes. They are for an officer who held the rank of Oberstabsingenieur (staff engineering officer). Each has a black velvet surface on which the engineering officer’s gilt device (an anchor and gear) appears. Flanking the engineering device are two gilt pips. Extending down the sides are a magnificent set of gilt bullion ringlets. Silver bullion tape also extends around each epaulette’s tongue. The epaulette’s end is graced by a small gilt Navy button. Underneath each epaulette we see black velvet and leather holding the brass device that attaches the epaulette to the uniform. These epaulettes are in VERY fine condition!

SILVER-TONED KAISERLICHE MARINE UNIFORM BUTTONS – PLAIN

SILVER-TONED KAISERLICHE MARINE UNIFORM BUTTONS – PLAIN

These are silver-toned uniform buttons for an enlisted sailor’s tunic. The buttons measure 1″ (20mm) in diameter. They are the larger sized that ran down a tunic’s center, NOT the smaller size used on the sleeves. The buttons have a mirrored finish and bear the Kaiserliche Marine’s crowned, fouled anchor. We have a total of twenty-four buttons in the following quantities, with a variety of markings on the reverse.

* Eleven are marked “A & S Kaiserliche Marine.”

* Eight are marked “Extra Fein.” Six Remain

* Seven are marked “Hochfeine Qualität.”

It has been some time since we have offered Navy buttons. They typically sell very quickly. This is a good opportunity to pick up a few for future needs or to replace a tunic’s missing button.

KAISERLICHE MARINE OFFICER’S CUFF LINKS

KAISERLICHE MARINE OFFICER’S CUFF LINKS

This is an extremely fine pair of officer’s cuff links from the Imperial German Navy. Each cuff link is made from a small, gold-toned, officer’s button bearing the Navy’s fouled anchor with a Kaiser Crown above it. The buttons have different makers, but their covers look the same. The cuff links are in mint condition.

PRUSSIA – ÜBERROCK – ADMIRAL – NAVY – KAISERLICHE MARINE

PRUSSIA – ÜBERROCK – ADMIRAL – NAVY – KAISERLICHE MARINE

This is an amazing find for us at Der Rittmeister Militaria. Today we are offering a very special, full Admiral’s überrock. Finding tunics for General Officers is a hard task, although we are proud that our current inventory boasts tunics or complete General’s uniforms for Prussia, Württemberg, Saxony, and Braunschweig. Finding tunics for Kaiserliche Marine Admiräle is indeed a daunting task. Even tunics for junior officers are NOT easy to find. [We were blessed in the past to offer none other than Großadmiral Prinz Heinrich of Prussia’s überrock].
The Kaiserliche Marine possessed only four Admiräle levels. Unlike the Imperial German Army, which featured five Generals’ levels, the Navy did not sport a Generaloberst’s equivalent (the Army’s Generaloberst being its highest rank). The Navy Admiräle ranks included the four positions listed below, in lowest-to-highest order.

Konteradmiral
Vizeadmiral
Admiral
Großadmiral

For the most part, Admiral was the Kaiserliche Marine’s highest operational/tactical rank. Of the six men who achieved the Großadmiral’s rank, only ONE actually commanded fleet operations: Prinz Heinrich, Kaiser Wilhelm II’s younger brother. He commanded activities in the Baltic during WW I, and did not achieve his rank until 1909. The rest of the six included two who commanded the overall Kaiserliche Marine (Alfred von Tirpitz [1911] and Henning von Holtzendorff [1918]), and whose official titles were “State Secretaries of the Imperial Navy Office.” Another, Hans von Koester, received the rank in 1905, primarily as a thank-you when he was approaching retirement. The final two recipients were royals (Kaiser Wilhelm II and King Oskar II of Sweden), both of whom received the rank in 1901, the year in which it was originated.
So, a man who achieved an Admiral’s rank was a very high level naval officer who commanded great responsibility within the Kaiserliche Marine. Today, we are offering just such a man’s überrock. [The classic naval überrock was a frock coat that extended down its wearer’s legs, rather than stopping near the waist as did most tunics]. Our überrock is made from fine-quality, dark-blue, buttery-smooth wool. It sports a double row of gleaming gilt buttons (five-per-side) that run down the uniform’s center. The buttons display fouled anchors with Hohenzollern Crowns above them. The überrock’s left breast features a row of sewn-in loops for displaying a ribbon bar. The loops’ total width is 2.”

The shoulder boards are of the slip-on variety. Each features a small gilt Navy button, and the two silver pips typical of an Admiral’s shoulder boards. [It is one area where the Imperial German Navy’s shoulder boards differed from those belonging to the Army. For the Army, silver pips generally indicated an à la Suite officer, whereas gold pips signaled a staff or field-assigned officer. Navy shoulder boards were the exact opposite]. These shoulder boards feature “Russian rope” bullion, whose design displays alternating silver and gold rows. The silver bullion rope is imbedded with black chevrons. The shoulder boards have the dark-blue underlay characteristic of all Navy shoulder boards (a key point when confirming Navy status).

Each überrock sleeve displays a small gold bullion Hohenzollern Crown that measures 1 ” x 1 ½.” Each sleeve also reveals a wide gold bullion tape band that measures 2,” as well as two narrow gold bullion tape bands that each measure ” in width. It is here that we discover an anomaly. Two bands indicate a Vizeadmiral, while three stand for a full Admiral. I examined the shoulder boards closely, checking their size, fit, and etc. It is clear to me that they have been attached for a long time, and are NOT recent additions. [It is my view (and that of other knowledgeable collectors and experts) that the überrock’s owner never took the tunic to a tailor to have the other bullion band added after his promotion. As it is likely that a man of his rank owned several uniforms, it is quite possible our offering was an earlier tunic that he did not upgrade. He simply inserted the correct shoulder boards once he was promoted from Vizeadmiral to Admiral. Then he later purchased other tunics with the correct sleeve markings and shoulder boards].

The überrock’s reverse exhibits six more (three per side) large gilt buttons in its vent area. Its interior displays a magnificent, superior quality black silk lining. The inside lining possesses three large pockets. Two are slash examples, while the third is the more conventional vertical example. The entire liner is in excellent condition.
The überrock is in stunning condition, overall. We are pleased to share it with you today.

PRUSSIA – SHOULDER BOARDS – VIZEADMIRAL – KAISERLICHE MARINE

PRUSSIA – SHOULDER BOARDS – VIZEADMIRAL – KAISERLICHE MARINE

This is a Kaiserliche Marine Vizeadmiral’s pair of shoulder boards. [The Imperial German Navy featured only four Admiräle ranks, while the Imperial German Army boasted five General Officer levels. The missing naval rank was equivalent to the Army’s Generaloberst(respectively equivalent to the U.S. Army’s four star general). The Kaiserliche Marine’s four Admiräle ranks were Konteradmiral, Vizeadmiral, Admiral, and Großadmiral (the last rank awarded to only SIX men from its inception in 1901 through its last recipient in 1918)]. Vizeadmiral was a very high rank whose recipients generally commanded fleets, squadrons, and other large tactical units or administrative posts.
Each shoulder board measures 4 ¼” x 2 7/16.” They closely resemble an Army General’s shoulder board pattern of two gold Russian bullion ropes enclosing a silver bullion rope sporting chevrons that are half black, one quarter red and one quarter white (Imperial Germany’s national colors). A single silver-toned pip on each board indicates the Vizeadmiral’s rank. The shoulder boards’ dark-blue felt underlays further confirm their Kaiserliche Marine status. Their reverses also reveal the straps that helped hold the boards securely on the tunic, along with a small gilt toned button at the opposite end.
These are very rare Navy shoulder boards in absolutely gorgeous condition. They would make welcome additions to any serious naval collection.

VIVAT RIBBON – KAISER WILHELM II AND THE KAISERLICHE MARINE

VIVAT RIBBON – KAISER WILHELM II AND THE KAISERLICHE MARINE

This is a Vivat Ribbon commemorating Kaiser Wilhelm II and the Kaiserliche Marine. The Vivat shows a Kriegsflagge at the top. Below that is a circular panel featuring a WW I-era German warship with the dates 1683-1914, along with Hohenzollern shields above it. Another circular panel shows the Kaiser and, I believe, Frederick III (a.k.a.) Frederick I, the Prince Elector of Brandenburg (upon his death he would be succeeded by Frederick the Great). The final circular panel shows a warship from the 1680’s. At this time Prussia was a second-rate (at best) naval power, unable to match the might of Great Britain or Spain. It is a very decorative Vivat. The ribbon is white in color. It measures 16 1/8″ x 2 1/2.” Vivats were authorized under the auspices of the German Red Cross, with part of the proceeds to benefit their work. $55.00

GERMANY – CUP – AIR SERVICE, LUFTSCHIFFER SERVICE, AND THE KAISERLICHE MARINE

GERMANY – CUP – AIR SERVICE, LUFTSCHIFFER SERVICE, AND THE KAISERLICHE MARINE

This is a wonderful cup that salutes three of the most highly visible branches of the German military. Commemorated here are the Imperial German Air Service, the Zeppelin Service, and the Imperial German Navy. The cup measures 5″ in height. It is 3 1/8″ in diameter at the lip and 2 1/4″ in diameter at the base. The central theme of the cup is an outline of an Iron Cross. Within the Iron Cross we see an airplane, zeppelin, and various navy ships. Included in the vessels are surface ships and a U-boat. This is very well made by a firm in Bavaria. It is in excellent condition.

TWO OFFICER PATENTS – ONE OF WHICH IS SIGNED BY KAISER WILHELM II FOR A DOCTOR SERVING IN THE KAISERLICHE MARINE

TWO OFFICER PATENTS – ONE OF WHICH IS SIGNED BY KAISER WILHELM II FOR A DOCTOR SERVING IN THE KAISERLICHE MARINE

We are always pleased to offer you patents (two) for one officer, particularly a naval officer. They are for a medical doctor named Wilhelm Haltermann. The two documents are described below.

1). Dr. Haltermann was promoted to Marine-Ober-Assistenzarzt on 27 March 1909. The document was prepared at the Neues Palais. The document measures 8 ½” x 14″ when closed, and 17″ x 14″ when opened. It is set up with four pages, although only two are used. Its second page features a large embossed Hohenzollern Eagle.

2). The second document is set up in a similar fashion. In this document we see that Dr. Haltermann was promoted to Marine-Stabsarzt in 1912. Again, the embossed Hohenzollern Eagle appears. This promotion, however, features Kaiser Wilhelm II’s large and bold signature. At this time we do not know what service if any that Dr. Haltermann had during and after WW I. Any additional information on him would be greatly appreciated from our audience.

It is a fine pair of documents. As they are to a navy doctor, we can be assured that they are scarce.

PRUSSIA – EHRENRANGLISTE DER KAISERLICHE DEUTSCHEN MARINE – 1914-1918

PRUSSIA – EHRENRANGLISTE DER KAISERLICHE DEUTSCHEN MARINE – 1914-1918

Both the German Army and Navy produced annual publications that showcased their various units and to which ones officers were assigned. (As a matter of fact, they shared a single book in the 1860’s, before Germany’s consolidation and a new Kaiser greatly increased their sizes). Ranglistes are very useful tools for researching officers and their assignments at given times within their careers. One of the most useful of the books was the one that showed the combined results during the years of WW I (1914-1916). Both the Army and Navy produced such a book after WW I. The navy was always the smaller branch, with fewer officers. This was further influenced by the larger numbers of army officers killed in action.
Today we are offering the Ehrenrangliste der Kaiserliche Deutschen Marine (Honor Rank List for the Imperial German Navy), which covers the years 1914 through 1918. The book was published in 1930. It is quite large, measuring 8 1/4″ x 5 1/4″ x 3 1/4″ and weighing a hefty 4 lb. 7 ounces. With it, you can seek out a particular officer and determine his rank, what ships or other assignments wherein he served, etc. These books are quite helpful and hard-to-find. I have seen these fetch nearly $1,000 in the past. The binding on our example is a bit weak, so caution should be exercised when using it (which should go without saying for an eighty-year-old book. [SALES ON ALL RANGLISTEN ARE FINAL. We do NOT send them out on approval, or for someone to do research and then return them. Please keep this in mind when ordering any rangliste].

GERMANY – POSTCARD – SEAPLANE – MARINE FLIEGER

GERMANY – POSTCARD – SEAPLANE – MARINE FLIEGER

This a full color postcard of A German seaplane in flight. There is no identification as to type. There is a note at the bottom which is headed by “Marine Flieger” (Navy plane). At the very bottom is mention of Prinz Heinrich of Prussia. He was the younger brother of Kaiser Wilhelm II and a Großadmiral in the Kaiserliche Marine. Heinrich was an enthusiastic aviation and automobile buff….

GERMANY – DAGGER – NAVY – REICHSMARINE – PRODUCED ABOARD SHIP

GERMANY – DAGGER – NAVY – REICHSMARINE – PRODUCED ABOARD SHIP

DAGGER – NAVY – REICHSMARINE – PRODUCED ABOARD SHIP.

Following WW I’s end, in 1919 the Kaiserliche Marine became the ReichsMarine, which it remained until it was replaced by the Kriegsmarine on 1 Juni 1935. Officers continued to carry a dagger (dolch) for certain occasions. The daggers were similar in many instances. The biggest difference was that their grips were black, (perhaps in mourning for the Kaiserliche Marine’s end). Officers could choose to retain the Kaiser Crown at their daggers’ tops, or they could choose another pommel-style that indicated the ReichsMarine. In some cases, the officer filed off the cross that appeared atop his Kaiserliche Marine dagger’s crowned pommel as an act of protest.

Today we are offering a unique ReichsMarine dagger. The man who sold it to me was of the opinion that this dagger was Bordfertigung (fabricated onboard a German ship). Obviously, to produce a dagger such as this one, its creator must have been highly-skilled in a machine shop!
I am of the opinion that the Kaiser Crown was NOT machined in the shop, but was original to a dagger. It appears identical to examples I have seen in the past. I cannot believe that this part of the dagger could have been created onboard the ship. It actually screws off just like it would on a naval dagger. The grip, however, most certainly was fashioned in a machine shop. It lacks the typical ivory or walrus tusk handle. It is wrapped loosely by two different kinds of wire. Whereas a traditional dagger would have one SINGLE wire wrap on its grip, this appears to many. A ring of laurel leaves appears below that.
The dagger measures 9” in length from the tip of its crown to the bottom of its scabbard. It is clearly much shorter than a traditional naval dagger. When pulled from the scabbard, the blade measures 4 ¼” in length. The scabbard itself measures a total of 7 ½” in length. Two rings appear on opposite sides of the scabbard. A metal chain is attached to each ring. The chain is attached to a brass clip that would have allowed the dagger to be slipped onto a belt. This arrangement replaced a normal set of hangers that attached to the dagger and the officer’s belt.

The dagger’s blade is unadorned and shows signs of wear where it has been removed from the scabbard. This is a very clever and well done piece of what could be considered a type of “trench art.”

If you are looking for an interesting piece to display with a regular naval dagger or other naval items, you will find it a worthy addition to your collection. Quite frankly, I have never seen anything quite like it. It may well be in the “one-of-a-kind” category.

GERMANY – DAGGER – NAVY – OFFICER REICHSMARINE – WITH INITIAL STAMP

GERMANY – DAGGER – NAVY – OFFICER REICHSMARINE – WITH INITIAL STAMP

DAGGER – NAVY – OFFICER REICHSMARINE – WITH INITIAL STAMP.

During and following the Imperial German Period, military officers commonly maintained stamps on their desks that allowed them to imprint their initials and/or cypher on wax seals. Such stamps were generally ornamental in nature. Our offering today is both unique and elegant in that it is modeled on a naval dagger’s pommel, grip, and cross guard. [PLEASE NOTE: it is smaller than an actual dagger in order to take up less desk space].

Its owner clearly was a naval officer(I cannot begin to estimate his rank) who had served in the Kaiserliche Marine either before and/or during WW I, then served in the ReichsMarine after 1919. A ReichsMarine dagger was noted for its black grip rather than the Kaiserliche Marine’s ivory one (signifying mourning for the latter’s passing). Officers could choose to mount either a Kaiserliche Marine’s Kaiser Crown or the ReichsMarine’s “Flaming Ball” as the pommel.
Our offering today features a black, single-wire-wrapped grip. A Kaiser Crown is mounted atop the pommel. [It unscrews just like a full-sized dagger]. NO cross appears at the top, which had been the practice during the Kaiserliche Marine era. Instead, an “X” takes its place.
The stamp’s total height is 4 ½.” It features a brass cross guard that measures ¾” from tip to tip. A circular brass piece that measures 2 ½” in diameter appears at the base. Its initials are “H.F.” [If your initials match this, contact me and I will give you a VERY special price]!

Pieces like this are important decorations on MY desk, which is where this will reside until a new owner acquires it.

BREAD/DESSERT PLATE FROM KAISER WILHELM II’S KAISERLICHER YACHT CLUB (KYC) RACING SLOOP S. M. Y. IDUNA.

BREAD/DESSERT PLATE FROM KAISER WILHELM II’S KAISERLICHER YACHT CLUB (KYC) RACING SLOOP S. M. Y. IDUNA.

This is a very rare bread or dessert plate from his racing sloop, the S. M. Y. Iduna. The Kaiser was an avid sailor. He had a special place in his heart for his Navy AND his personal yachts. Although the Kaiser employed the luxurious S. M. Y. Hohenzollern to travel all over Europe and the Middle East with his family and various guests, the S. M. Y. Iduna was reserved for yacht racing and activities associated with the Kaiserlicher Yacht Club (KYC), in which he served as Commodore. The KYC had its origins in a yacht club originally founded in 1887 for Kiel’s naval officers. It had been known as the Marine-Regatta-Verein, and its original patron was Prinz Heinrich of Prussia, Wilhelm II’s younger brother. Heinrich was a serving officer in the Kaiserliche Marine and a yachting enthusiast. [He later rose to the rank of Großadmiral and commanded the German naval forces based in Kiel against the Russians].
In 1891, the club was opened to civilians as well as naval officers. Industrialist and arms manufacturer Alfred Krupp, along with other well-known Germans, joined the group. The members then asked Kaiser Wilhelm II to become its patron and renamed it the Kaiserlicher Yacht Club. [Naval officers revived the Marine-Regatta-Verein in 1928, and it continued to exist into WW II. It was disbanded by the Allies after the war, then re-founded in 1972 as the Marine-Regatta-Verein im Deutschen Marinebund e.V., and continues to this day].
Today we are offering a fantastic bread or dessert plate that was part of the Kaiser’s personal table service when aboard the S. M. Y. Iduna. [PLEASE NOTE: Wilhelm II’s wife, Kaiserin Augusta Viktoria, had her own tableware for the S. M. Y. Iduna. We are fortunate enough to hold a single example of it. Note also that Johannes von Karpf served as commander of both the S. M. Y. Iduna and the S. M. Y. Hohenzollern. He later rose to the rank of Admiral in the Kaiserliche Marine]. This magnificent plate measures 6 ½” in diameter. It has two different styles of gold trim bands around its edges. Its centerpiece is an Order of the Black Eagle Kette, whose center features the motto “Suum Cuique” (To each according to his own merits). The latter also appeared on the headdresses of Gardekorps Garde units, such as the Infanterie, Kavallerie, Artillerie, and etc.
The Kaiserlicher Yacht Club’s burgee (pennant) appears at the plate’s top. Just below the burgee, the KYC’s initials appear in gold over a blue bandeau displaying the name “Iduna” in gold. The plate’s reverse displays KPM of Berlin’s proper hallmarks. This notable firm, which still exists today, was the House of Hohenzollern’s official purveyor for all its royalty.

The plate comes from what may be the rarest tableware setting that Kaiser Wilhelm II owned. His naval tableware is much rarer than that featured at his various palaces, primarily because the ships’ smaller dining rooms accommodated far fewer guests. Since it was a racing sloop, the S. M. Y. Iduna was the smallest by far of all the Kaiser’s vessels, rendering any surviving examples of its tableware quite rare. The inclusion of the Kaiserlicher Yacht Club’s burgee makes it a very desirable piece. It is a pleasure to share it with you today.

SALAD PLATE FROM KAISER WILHELM II’S KAISERLICHER YACHT CLUB (KYC) RACING SLOOP S. M. Y. IDUNA

SALAD PLATE FROM KAISER WILHELM II’S KAISERLICHER YACHT CLUB (KYC) RACING SLOOP S. M. Y. IDUNA

This is a very rare salad plate from the S. M. Y. Iduna, Kaiser Wilhelm II’s racing sloop. The Kaiser was an avid sailor. He had a special place in his heart for his Navy AND his personal yachts. Although the Kaiser employed the luxurious S. M. Y. Hohenzollern to travel all over Europe and the Middle East with his family and various guests, the S. M. Y. Iduna was reserved for yacht racing and activities associated with the Kaiserlicher Yacht Club (KYC), in which he served as Commodore. The KYC had its origins in a yacht club originally founded in 1887 for Kiel’s naval officers. It had been known as the Marine-Regatta-Verein, and its original patron was Prinz Heinrich of Prussia, Wilhelm II’s younger brother. Heinrich was a serving officer in the Kaiserliche Marine and a yachting enthusiast. [He later rose to the rank of Großadmiral and commanded the German naval forces based in Kiel against the Russians].
In 1891, the club was opened to civilians as well as naval officers. Industrialist and arms manufacturer Alfred Krupp, along with other well-known Germans, joined the group. The members then asked Kaiser Wilhelm II to become its patron and renamed it the Kaiserlicher Yacht Club. [Naval officers revived the Marine-Regatta-Verein in 1928, and it continued to exist into WW II. It was disbanded by the Allies after the war, then re-founded in 1972 as the Marine-Regatta-Verein im Deutschen Marinebund e.V., and continues to this day].
Today we are offering a fantastic salad plate that was part of the Kaiser’s personal table service when aboard the S. M. Y. Iduna. [PLEASE NOTE: Wilhelm II’s wife, Kaiserin Augusta Viktoria, had her own tableware for the S. M. Y. Iduna. We are fortunate enough to hold a single example of it. Note also that Johannes von Karpf served as commander of both the S. M. Y. Iduna and the S. M. Y. Hohenzollern. He later rose to the rank of Admiral in the Kaiserliche Marine]. This magnificent plate measures 8 ½” in diameter. It has two different styles of gold trim bands around its edges. Its centerpiece is an Order of the Black Eagle Kette, whose center features the motto “Suum Cuique” (To each according to his own merits). The latter also appeared on the headdresses of Gardekorps Garde units, such as the Infanterie, Kavallerie, Artillerie, and etc.
The Kaiserlicher Yacht Club’s burgee (pennant) appears at the plate’s top. Just below the burgee, the KYC’s initials appear in gold over a blue bandeau displaying the name “Iduna” in gold. The plate’s reverse displays KPM of Berlin’s proper hallmarks. This notable firm, which still exists today, was the House of Hohenzollern’s official purveyor for all its royalty. We also see “1906,” the year that the plate was manufactured and entered into service aboard the S. M. Y. Iduna.

The plate comes from what may be the rarest tableware setting that Kaiser Wilhelm II owned. His naval tableware is much rarer than that featured at his various palaces, primarily because the ships’ smaller dining rooms accommodated far fewer guests. Since it was a racing sloop, the S. M. Y. Iduna was the smallest by far of all the Kaiser’s vessels, rendering any surviving examples of its tableware quite rare. The inclusion of the Kaiserlicher Yacht Club’s burgee makes it a very desirable piece. It is a pleasure to share it with you today.

DINNER PLATE FROM KAISER WILHELM II’S KAISERLICHER YACHT CLUB (KYC) RACING SLOOP S. M. Y. IDUNA

DINNER PLATE FROM KAISER WILHELM II’S KAISERLICHER YACHT CLUB (KYC) RACING SLOOP S. M. Y. IDUNA

This is a very rare dinner plate from the S. M. Y. Iduna, Kaiser Wilhelm II’s racing sloop. The Kaiser was an avid sailor. He had a special place in his heart for his Navy AND his personal yachts. Although the Kaiser employed the luxurious S. M. Y. Hohenzollern to travel all over Europe and the Middle East with his family and various guests, the S. M. Y. Iduna was reserved for yacht racing and activities associated with the Kaiserlicher Yacht Club (KYC), in which he served as Commodore. The KYC had its origins in a yacht club originally founded in 1887 for Kiel’s naval officers. It had been known as the Marine-Regatta-Verein, and its original patron was Prinz Heinrich of Prussia, Wilhelm II’s younger brother. Heinrich was a serving officer in the Kaiserliche Marine and a yachting enthusiast. [He later rose to the rank of Großadmiral and commanded the German naval forces based in Kiel against the Russians].
In 1891, the club was opened to civilians as well as naval officers. Industrialist and arms manufacturer Alfred Krupp, along with other well-known Germans, joined the group. The members then asked Kaiser Wilhelm II to become its patron and renamed it the Kaiserlicher Yacht Club. [Naval officers revived the Marine-Regatta-Verein in 1928, and it continued to exist into WW II. It was disbanded by the Allies after the war, then re-founded in 1972 as the Marine-Regatta-Verein im Deutschen Marinebund e.V., and continues to this day].
Today we are offering a fantastic dinner plate that was part of the Kaiser’s personal table service when aboard the S. M. Y. Iduna. [PLEASE NOTE: Wilhelm II’s wife, Kaiserin Augusta Viktoria, had her own tableware for the S. M. Y. Iduna. We are fortunate enough to hold a single example of it. Note also that Johannes von Karpf served as commander of both the S. M. Y. Iduna and the S. M. Y. Hohenzollern. He later rose to the rank of Admiral in the Kaiserliche Marine]. This magnificent plate measures 10″ in diameter. It has two different styles of gold trim bands around its edges. Its centerpiece is an Order of the Black Eagle Kette, whose center features the motto “Suum Cuique” (To each according to his own merits). The latter also appeared on the headdresses of Gardekorps Garde units, such as the Infanterie, Kavallerie, Artillerie, and etc.
The Kaiserlicher Yacht Club’s burgee (pennant) appears at the plate’s top. Just below the burgee, the KYC’s initials appear in gold over a blue bandeau displaying the name “Iduna” in gold. The plate’s reverse displays KPM of Berlin’s proper hallmarks. This notable firm, which still exists today, was the House of Hohenzollern’s official purveyor for all its royalty.

The plate comes from what may be the rarest tableware setting that Kaiser Wilhelm II owned. His naval tableware is much rarer than that featured at his various palaces, primarily because the ships’ smaller dining rooms accommodated far fewer guests. Since it was a racing sloop, the S. M. Y. Iduna was the smallest by far of all the Kaiser’s vessels, rendering any surviving examples of its tableware quite rare. The inclusion of the Kaiserlicher Yacht Club’s burgee makes it a very desirable piece. It is a pleasure to share it with you today.

BREAD PLATE FROM KAISER WILHELM II’S RACING SLOOP S. M. Y. IDUNA WITH KAISERLICHER YACHT CLUB (KYC)

BREAD PLATE FROM KAISER WILHELM II’S RACING SLOOP S. M. Y. IDUNA WITH KAISERLICHER YACHT CLUB (KYC)

Kaiser Wilhelm II was an avid sailor. He had a special place in his heart for his Navy AND his personal yachts. Today we are offering a very rare dinner plate from his racing sloop, the S. M. Y. Iduna. He raced it with the Kaiserlicher Yacht Club (KYC). The latter had its origins in a yacht club originally founded in 1887 for Kiel’s naval officers. It was known as the Marine-Regatta-Verein, and its original patron was Prinz Heinrich of Prussia, Wilhelm II’s younger brother. Heinrich was a serving officer in the Kaiserliche Marine and a yachting enthusiast. [He later rose to the rank of Großadmiral and commanded the German naval forces based in Kiel against the Russians].
In 1891, the club was opened to civilians as well as naval officers. Industrialist and arms manufacturer Alfred Krupp, along with other well-known Germans, joined the group. They asked Kaiser Wilhelm II to become the patron and renamed it the Kaiserlicher Yacht Club. [Naval officers revived the Marine-Regatta-Verein in 1928, and it continued to exist into WW II. It was disbanded by the Allies after the war, then re-founded in 1972 as the Marine-Regatta-Verein im Deutschen Marinebund e.V., and continues to this day].
Today we are offering a fantastic dinner plate that was part of the Kaiser’s personal table service when aboard the S. M. Y. Iduna. [PLEASE NOTE: Wilhelm II’s wife, Kaiserin Augusta Viktoria, had her own tableware for the S. M. Y. Iduna. We are fortunate enough to hold a singe example of it. Also, Johannes von Karpf served as commander of both the S. M. Y. Iduna and the S. M. Y. Hohenzollern. He rose to the rank of Admiral in the Kaiserliche Marine]. This magnificent plate measures 7″ in diameter. It has two different styles of gold trim bands around its edges. Its centerpiece is an Order of the Black Eagle Kette, whose center features the motto “Suum Cuique.” The latter also appeared on the headdresses of Gardekorps Garde units, including Infanterie, Kavallerie, Artillerie, etc. The Kaiserlicher Yacht Club’s burgee (pennant) appears at the plate’s top. Below the burgee the K. Y. C.’s initials appear in gold above a blue bandeau displaying the name “Iduna” in gold.
The plate’s reverse displays KPM of Berlin’s proper hallmarks. This notable firm, which still exists today, was the House of Hohenzollern’s official purveyor for all its royalty. For some reason there is no date from when the plate was manufactured. That said, it is identical in every way to the other S. M. Y. Iduna plates.
The plate comes from what may be the rarest tableware setting that Kaiser Wilhelm II owned. His naval tableware is much rarer than that featured at his various palaces, primarily because the ships’ smaller dining rooms accommodated far fewer guests. Since it was a racing sloop, the S. M. Y. Iduna was by far the smallest of all the Kaiser’s vessels, rendering any surviving examples of its tableware quite rare. The inclusion of the Kaiserlicher Yacht Club’s burgee makes this a very desirable piece. It is a pleasure to be able to share it with you today.

SALAD/DESSERT PLATE FROM KAISER WILHELM II’S RACING SLOOP S. M. Y. IDUNA WITH KAISERLICHER YACHT CLUB (KYC)

SALAD/DESSERT PLATE FROM KAISER WILHELM II’S RACING SLOOP S. M. Y. IDUNA WITH KAISERLICHER YACHT CLUB (KYC)

Kaiser Wilhelm II was an avid sailor. He had a special place in his heart for his Navy AND his personal yachts. Today we are offering a very rare dinner plate from his racing sloop, the S. M. Y. Iduna. He raced it with the Kaiserlicher Yacht Club (KYC). The latter had its origins in a yacht club originally founded in 1887 for Kiel’s naval officers. It was known as the Marine-Regatta-Verein, and its original patron was Prinz Heinrich of Prussia, Wilhelm II’s younger brother. Heinrich was a serving officer in the Kaiserliche Marine and a yachting enthusiast. [He later rose to the rank of Großadmiral and commanded the German naval forces based in Kiel against the Russians].
In 1891, the club was opened to civilians as well as naval officers. Industrialist and arms manufacturer Alfred Krupp, along with other well-known Germans, joined the group. They asked Kaiser Wilhelm II to become the patron and renamed it the Kaiserlicher Yacht Club. [Naval officers revived the Marine-Regatta-Verein in 1928, and it continued to exist into WW II. It was disbanded by the Allies after the war, then re-founded in 1972 as the Marine-Regatta-Verein im Deutschen Marinebund e.V., and continues to this day].
Today we are offering a fantastic dinner plate that was part of the Kaiser’s personal table service when aboard the S. M. Y. Iduna. [PLEASE NOTE: Wilhelm II’s wife, Kaiserin Augusta Viktoria, had her own tableware for the S. M. Y. Iduna. We are fortunate enough to hold a singe example of it. Also, Johannes von Karpf served as commander of both the S. M. Y. Iduna and the S. M. Y. Hohenzollern. He rose to the rank of Admiral in the Kaiserliche Marine]. This magnificent plate measures 8 ½” in diameter. It has two different styles of gold trim bands around its edges. Its centerpiece is an Order of the Black Eagle Kette, whose center features the motto “Suum Cuique.” The latter also appeared on the headdresses of Gardekorps Garde units, including Infanterie, Kavallerie, Artillerie, etc. The Kaiserlicher Yacht Club’s burgee (pennant) appears at the plate’s top. Below the burgee the K. Y. C.’s initials appear in gold above a blue bandeau displaying the name “Iduna” in gold.
The plate’s reverse displays KPM of Berlin’s proper hallmarks. This notable firm, which still exists today, was the House of Hohenzollern’s official purveyor for all its royalty. We also see “1906,” the year that the plate was manufactured and entered into service aboard the S. M. Y. Iduna. Also on the reverse is a sticker showing that the plate was sold at a 2002 Christie’s auction. I felt this was a part of the plate’s history and opted to leave it for its new owner.
The plate comes from what may be the rarest tableware setting that Kaiser Wilhelm II owned. His naval tableware is much rarer than that featured at his various palaces, primarily because the ships’ smaller dining rooms accommodated far fewer guests. Since it was a racing sloop, the S. M. Y. Iduna was by far the smallest of all the Kaiser’s vessels, rendering any surviving examples of its tableware quite rare. The inclusion of the Kaiserlicher Yacht Club’s burgee makes this a very desirable piece. It is a pleasure to be able to share it with you today.
[PLEASE NOTE: a very small chip appears on the plate’s edge. I did not notice it the first time I examined the plate. I only noticed it when I dragged my fingertip over the edge and felt the roughness of a chip. To be honest, you have to look closely to even find it. It is barely noticeable. The asking price of the plate reflects its flaw. Had it been perfect like the other plates we are offering from the S. M. Y. Iduna, the price would have been several hundred dollars more].

DINNER PLATE FROM KAISER WILHELM II’S RACING SLOOP S. M. Y. IDUNA WITH KAISERLICHER YACHT CLUB (KYC)

DINNER PLATE FROM KAISER WILHELM II’S RACING SLOOP S. M. Y. IDUNA WITH KAISERLICHER YACHT CLUB (KYC)

Kaiser Wilhelm II was an avid sailor. He had a special place in his heart for his Navy AND his personal yachts. Today we are offering a very rare dinner plate from his racing sloop, the S. M. Y. Iduna. He raced it with the Kaiserlicher Yacht Club (KYC). The latter had its origins in a yacht club originally founded in 1887 for Kiel’s naval officers. It was known as the Marine-Regatta-Verein, and its original patron was Prinz Heinrich of Prussia, Wilhelm II’s younger brother. Heinrich was a serving officer in the Kaiserliche Marine and a yachting enthusiast. [He later rose to the rank of Großadmiral and commanded the German naval forces based in Kiel against the Russians].
In 1891, the club was opened to civilians as well as naval officers. Industrialist and arms manufacturer Alfred Krupp, along with other well-known Germans, joined the group. They asked Kaiser Wilhelm II to become the patron and renamed it the Kaiserlicher Yacht Club. [Naval officers revived the Marine-Regatta-Verein in 1928, and it continued to exist into WW II. It was disbanded by the Allies after the war, then re-founded in 1972 as the Marine-Regatta-Verein im Deutschen Marinebund e.V., and continues to this day].
Today we are offering a fantastic dinner plate that was part of the Kaiser’s personal table service when aboard the S. M. Y. Iduna. [PLEASE NOTE: Wilhelm II’s wife, Kaiserin Augusta Viktoria, had her own tableware for the S. M. Y. Iduna. We are fortunate enough to hold a singe example of it. Also, Johannes von Karpf served as commander of both the S. M. Y. Iduna and the S. M. Y. Hohenzollern. He rose to the rank of Admiral in the Kaiserliche Marine]. This magnificent plate measures 10″ in diameter. It has two different styles of gold trim bands around its edges. Its centerpiece is an Order of the Black Eagle Kette, whose center features the motto “Suum Cuique.” The latter also appeared on the headdresses of Gardekorps Garde units, including Infanterie, Kavallerie, Artillerie, etc.
The Kaiserlicher Yacht Club’s burgee (pennant) appears at the plate’s top. Below the burgee the K. Y. C.’s initials appear in gold above a blue bandeau displaying the name “Iduna” in gold. The plate’s reverse displays KPM of Berlin’s proper hallmarks. This notable firm, which still exists today, was the House of Hohenzollern’s official purveyor for all its royalty. We also see “1907,” the year that the plate was manufactured and entered into service aboard the S. M. Y. Iduna.
The plate comes from what may be the rarest tableware setting that Kaiser Wilhelm II owned. His naval tableware is much rarer than that featured at his various palaces, primarily because the ships’ smaller dining rooms accommodated far fewer guests. Since it was a racing sloop, the S. M. Y. Iduna was by far the smallest of all the Kaiser’s vessels, rendering any surviving examples of its tableware quite rare. The inclusion of the Kaiserlicher Yacht Club’s burgee makes this a very desirable piece. It is a pleasure to be able to share it with you today.

GERMANY – REICHSMARINE OFFICER – BROCADE BELT – BUCKLE

GERMANY – REICHSMARINE OFFICER – BROCADE BELT – BUCKLE

This is a brocade belt and buckle for a Reichsmarine officer. The Reichsmarine was Germany’s Navy from the monarchy’s fall in 1918 until 1935, when the Third Reich’s Kriegsmarine replaced it. The Reichsmarine was severely limited to 15,000 men by the Treaty of Versailles, as was the number and size of the ships that Germany could use. The belt is classic brocade, with twin gray lines against a silver bullion background. The bullion’s toning is quite splendid. The belt buckle measures 2 ½” x 2 1/4,” and displays a superb gilt finish. It features a fouled anchor (as did the Kaiserliche Marine), but has no Kaiser Crown. The keeps are present, and the belt is 100% complete. The belt itself measures 33.” Its overall condition is excellent.

REICHSMARINE OFFICER – BROCADE BELT – BUCKLE – PHOTOGRAPH

REICHSMARINE OFFICER – BROCADE BELT – BUCKLE – PHOTOGRAPH

This is a brocade belt and buckle for a Reichsmarine officer. The Reichsmarine was Germany’s Navy from the monarchy’s fall in 1918 until 1935, when the Third Reich’s Kriegsmarine replaced it. The Reichsmarine was severely limited to 15,000 men by the Treaty of Versailles, as were the number and size of the ships that Germany could use. The belt is classic brocade, with twin gray lines against a silver bullion background. The bullion’s toning is quite handsome. The belt buckle measures 2 ½” x 2 1/4,” and displays a superb gilt finish. It features a fouled anchor as did that of the Kaiserliche Marine, but has no Kaiser Crown. The keeps are present, and the belt is 100% complete. The belt itself measures 43″ x 1 7/8.” Its overall condition is excellent. A 5 3/8″ x 3 ½”photo of a Reichsmarine officer wearing a similar belt (I cannot say with certainty that the belt shown in the photograph is in fact the belt that we offer today.) accompanies the belt.

ENLISTED REICHSMARINE SAILOR’S DRESS TUNIC’S EXTENSION BUTTONS

ENLISTED REICHSMARINE SAILOR’S DRESS TUNIC’S EXTENSION BUTTONS

After WW I and before the Kriegsmarine’s (1935-1945) creation, the Reichsmarine (1919-1935) served as Germany’s Navy. Most of its traditions were similar to those of the Kaiserliche Marine. Its uniforms, headdresses, etc., primarily were identical. One small change was that the Imperial German Period’s Hohenzollern Crown was deleted from its buttons, badges, and so on. Today we are offering a pair of extension buttons that were used on enlisted sailors’ dress tunics. These two buttons are attached to a small chain. The two buttons are then inserted into buttonholes on the tunic’s opposite sides. The chain allows the tunic to remain “closed” without being tightly buttoned. The two small buttons do NOT boast Hohenzollern Crowns. Instead, they are decorated only with the German Navy’s fouled anchor. Each button sports a manufacturer’s hallmark. While not totally correct for use on a Kaiserliche Marine dress tunic, they could be used in a pinch for display purposes. Naturally, they can be used on Reichsmarine tunics. The device is in top condition.

PRUSSIA – DRESS MESS JACKET – NAVY – KAISERLICHER YACHT CLUB

PRUSSIA – DRESS MESS JACKET – NAVY – KAISERLICHER YACHT CLUB

The Kaiserlicher Yacht Club was the most exclusive yacht club in Germany. Its leading members were royalty and/or navy officers. Kaiser Wilhelm II was the principal member of the club and its Kommodore, which reflected his intense interest in boats, ships, and yachting. Aside from holding the rank of Großadmiral in the Kaiserliche Marine, the Kaiser was also involved in the activities of the Yacht Club. He even raced yachts in regattas of the club which included the S.M.S. Wunsch.

This tunic is very similar to a naval dress tunic in cut and general appearance. The lapels of the tunic have a combination of material and silk trim. The tunic, which is in excellent plus condition, features a double row of five large buttons on the chest and five smaller buttons on each sleeve. Each of these buttons are actually standard navy buttons that feature the fouled anchor and Hohenzollern Crown. This tunic is in excellent condition and would be a fine addition to any navy-related collection. You will not see one of these every day, and certainly not in this condition.