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PRUSSIA – KUEGELHELM – RESERVE OFFICER – ARTILLERIE – WITH “FRW” WAPPEN

SKU: 33-131

$6,395.00

This is a reserve officer’s kugelhelm. It is correct for either Feldartillerie-Regiment Prinz August von Preußen (1. Litthauisches) Nr 1, 1. Pommersches Feldartillerie-Regiment Nr 2, Feldartillerie-Regiment General Feldzügmeister (1. Brandenburgisches) Nr 3, or Feldartillerie-Regiment von Peucker (1. Schlesisches) Nr 6. Only these four regiments wore this wappen-style. In 1. Pommersches Feldartillerie-Regiment Nr 2, Batterie Nr 1 wore a “Colberg. 1807” bandeau. Batterie Nr 6 from Feldartillerie-Regiment General Feldzügmeister (1. Brandenburgisches) Nr 3 also wore the “Colberg. 1807” bandeau. The explanation for the difference is quite simple. The four regiments were the Prussian Army’s oldest.
I bought this kugelhelm for a number of reasons. The first and most obvious reason is its wappen, as I explained above. The second is the helmet’s fiber body. This was still a novel substance early in the 20th Century, and I doubt it was an inexpensive option. The advantage of fiber is that it is a forerunner of fiberglass and that it delivers an incredible, high-gloss finish and is quite strong. Even after hours of diligent polishing, the more common (and less-expensive) leather helmets lack a fiber helmet’s mirror-like luster. In many ways a fiber helmet resembles patent leather, which is still used in formal wear shoes today. So, our helmet displays a very high level of gloss. A downside to fiber is that, like fiberglass, it can crack. Generally speaking, the cracking of fiber is not as severe as a leather helmet that cracks as it dries out. An elliptical circular crack extends from the wappen back to the rear trim on the helmet’s left side. The crack is not wide. It is more of a stress fracture. The wappen is beautifully frosted gilt. All of the helmet’s furniture is gilt, with the exception of the silver reserve officer’s cross. The reserve cross sits below the king’s cypher. As is correct for reserve officers helmets, the slogan “Für Gott un Vaterland” appears on the cross rather than on the eagle. The reserve officer’s cross also displays the date 1813. The rest of the furniture is in prime condition. Both the officer and Reich’s kokarden are present and in lovely condition. The helmet’s interior is especially interesting. The leather sweatband is of supreme quality. It has the rarely-seen high stitching embellishing the interior.
The liner is green silk. It is a much different style of material than we generally see in helmets. The usual silk is a thicker, heavier weave. This silk is almost paper-thin. One clearly can see the watermark in it. Some sections of the silk liner are missing. It has substantial tearing. I still like this liner however, because we just do not see them very often. All of the original hardware is intact. The size, “57,” is penciled in.

It is a remarkable kugelhelm that was worn by one of the Prussian Army’s oldest artillery regiments

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Description

This is a reserve officer’s kugelhelm. It is correct for either Feldartillerie-Regiment Prinz August von Preußen (1. Litthauisches) Nr 1, 1. Pommersches Feldartillerie-Regiment Nr 2, Feldartillerie-Regiment General Feldzügmeister (1. Brandenburgisches) Nr 3, or Feldartillerie-Regiment von Peucker (1. Schlesisches) Nr 6. Only these four regiments wore this wappen-style. In 1. Pommersches Feldartillerie-Regiment Nr 2, Batterie Nr 1 wore a “Colberg. 1807” bandeau. Batterie Nr 6 from Feldartillerie-Regiment General Feldzügmeister (1. Brandenburgisches) Nr 3 also wore the “Colberg. 1807” bandeau. The explanation for the difference is quite simple. The four regiments were the Prussian Army’s oldest.
I bought this kugelhelm for a number of reasons. The first and most obvious reason is its wappen, as I explained above. The second is the helmet’s fiber body. This was still a novel substance early in the 20th Century, and I doubt it was an inexpensive option. The advantage of fiber is that it is a forerunner of fiberglass and that it delivers an incredible, high-gloss finish and is quite strong. Even after hours of diligent polishing, the more common (and less-expensive) leather helmets lack a fiber helmet’s mirror-like luster. In many ways a fiber helmet resembles patent leather, which is still used in formal wear shoes today. So, our helmet displays a very high level of gloss. A downside to fiber is that, like fiberglass, it can crack. Generally speaking, the cracking of fiber is not as severe as a leather helmet that cracks as it dries out. An elliptical circular crack extends from the wappen back to the rear trim on the helmet’s left side. The crack is not wide. It is more of a stress fracture. The wappen is beautifully frosted gilt. All of the helmet’s furniture is gilt, with the exception of the silver reserve officer’s cross. The reserve cross sits below the king’s cypher. As is correct for reserve officers helmets, the slogan “Für Gott un Vaterland” appears on the cross rather than on the eagle. The reserve officer’s cross also displays the date 1813. The rest of the furniture is in prime condition. Both the officer and Reich’s kokarden are present and in lovely condition. The helmet’s interior is especially interesting. The leather sweatband is of supreme quality. It has the rarely-seen high stitching embellishing the interior.
The liner is green silk. It is a much different style of material than we generally see in helmets. The usual silk is a thicker, heavier weave. This silk is almost paper-thin. One clearly can see the watermark in it. Some sections of the silk liner are missing. It has substantial tearing. I still like this liner however, because we just do not see them very often. All of the original hardware is intact. The size, “57,” is penciled in.

It is a remarkable kugelhelm that was worn by one of the Prussian Army’s oldest artillery regiments

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