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Germany – Postcard – Oswald Boelcke – Autographed – Days before his death

SKU: 19-339

$1,995.00

We recently acquired a large collection of signed postcards, private photos, letters, etc. of German Admirals, Generals, etc. Many of these items were acquired by a single collector who would write to the subject and receive in return a signed photograph, postcard, letter. Etc. The name of this collector was Paul Baer and his name appears on many of the items offered….

 

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Germany – Postcard – Oswald Boelcke – Autographed – Days before his death

Oswald Boelcke (1891-191 6) was a leader in developing single seat fighter planes for the Imperial German army. He joined the army in 1912 and achieved his pilot training prior to the outbreak of WW I. A Fokker Eindecker was placed at his disposal in 1915. The Eindecker had the advantage over similar French airplanes who armored their propellers to deflect bullets as they fired through the propeller. The German airplanes had an interrupter device which allowed the machine gun to fire through the propeller without steel on the blades. This was such a prized development that the airplanes were not allowed to fly past German lines for fear that one ould be captured and the French and British would discover the secret.

With the Eindecker Boelcke and Max Immelmann would begin a race to see who would be the top scoring ace. This ended in 1916 with th death of Immelmann in June. Prior to that on 1 January 1916 both men were awarded the Pour le Mérite when they had achieved eight victories. This would be the benchmark for all of 1916 for this award. At this stage of the war eight victories was no small achievement. As the war progressed the number would increase until 1917-1918 when the number rose to twenty victories.

After the death of Immelmann Boelcke continued to add to his score. He was grounded for a month for fear that he would be lost in command. During this time he was charged with the responsibility of developing an all single seater squadron of fighter airplanes. These squadrons would become known as Jagdstaffels or Jastas. Previously the Fokker’s had been assigned to Observation squadrons. Boelcke’s new command was to be known as Jasta 2. He began selecting pilots for his new squadron and he selected young men whom he felt were aggressive and showed natural flying ability. One of the men he selected was a young man who had previously been in a cavalry regiment. His name was Manfred Freiherr von Richthofen (1892-1918). Boelcke began teaching his young cubs what he felt was the correct way to use a fighter airplane. This became known as the “Boelcke Dicta”. This set of rules is esentially what has been used for the last one hundred years in air to air combat.

Boelcke would continue to lead his Jasta and had accumulated an amazing score of forty victories. This would come to an end on 28 October 1916 when he had a mid air collision with one of his own pilots, a future commander of Jasta 2 and a PLM winner.

After his death, Jasta 2 was renamed Jasta Boelcke in his honor, the only Jasta during WW I to be named for a fallen pilot. After his death Manfred von Richthofen’s JG 1 of four Jastas was renamed in his honor. Over the years we have been privileged to offer signed Sanke cards of Oswald Boelcke. Today we offer something far different and far rarer. Ane in a certain way chilling.

This is a postcard without a photograph. It has a double signatuure of boelcke on the obverse and reverse. On the obverse besides his signature, it is dated 15 October 1916. There is a ink message and date but Boelcke’s signature is written in purple (check this out). The reverse is quite interesting. It has another Boelcke signature. It also has the rubber stamp for Jasta 2! There is another rubber stamp on it in the upper right corner which is for 14. ReserveKorps and is dated 18 October 1916, ten days before his death. The postcard is addressed to Karl Baer. We are thinking that Karl may have been a brother of paul to whom many of our items come from.

Anything connected with Oswald Boelcke is historic but this goes beyond that with two of his signatures, a unit stamp for Jasta 2, and being so close to his death.

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Description

 

Germany – Postcard – Oswald Boelcke – Autographed – Days before his death

Oswald Boelcke (1891-191 6) was a leader in developing single seat fighter planes for the Imperial German army. He joined the army in 1912 and achieved his pilot training prior to the outbreak of WW I. A Fokker Eindecker was placed at his disposal in 1915. The Eindecker had the advantage over similar French airplanes who armored their propellers to deflect bullets as they fired through the propeller. The German airplanes had an interrupter device which allowed the machine gun to fire through the propeller without steel on the blades. This was such a prized development that the airplanes were not allowed to fly past German lines for fear that one ould be captured and the French and British would discover the secret.

With the Eindecker Boelcke and Max Immelmann would begin a race to see who would be the top scoring ace. This ended in 1916 with th death of Immelmann in June. Prior to that on 1 January 1916 both men were awarded the Pour le Mérite when they had achieved eight victories. This would be the benchmark for all of 1916 for this award. At this stage of the war eight victories was no small achievement. As the war progressed the number would increase until 1917-1918 when the number rose to twenty victories.

After the death of Immelmann Boelcke continued to add to his score. He was grounded for a month for fear that he would be lost in command. During this time he was charged with the responsibility of developing an all single seater squadron of fighter airplanes. These squadrons would become known as Jagdstaffels or Jastas. Previously the Fokker’s had been assigned to Observation squadrons. Boelcke’s new command was to be known as Jasta 2. He began selecting pilots for his new squadron and he selected young men whom he felt were aggressive and showed natural flying ability. One of the men he selected was a young man who had previously been in a cavalry regiment. His name was Manfred Freiherr von Richthofen (1892-1918). Boelcke began teaching his young cubs what he felt was the correct way to use a fighter airplane. This became known as the “Boelcke Dicta”. This set of rules is esentially what has been used for the last one hundred years in air to air combat.

Boelcke would continue to lead his Jasta and had accumulated an amazing score of forty victories. This would come to an end on 28 October 1916 when he had a mid air collision with one of his own pilots, a future commander of Jasta 2 and a PLM winner.

After his death, Jasta 2 was renamed Jasta Boelcke in his honor, the only Jasta during WW I to be named for a fallen pilot. After his death Manfred von Richthofen’s JG 1 of four Jastas was renamed in his honor. Over the years we have been privileged to offer signed Sanke cards of Oswald Boelcke. Today we offer something far different and far rarer. Ane in a certain way chilling.

This is a postcard without a photograph. It has a double signatuure of boelcke on the obverse and reverse. On the obverse besides his signature, it is dated 15 October 1916. There is a ink message and date but Boelcke’s signature is written in purple (check this out). The reverse is quite interesting. It has another Boelcke signature. It also has the rubber stamp for Jasta 2! There is another rubber stamp on it in the upper right corner which is for 14. ReserveKorps and is dated 18 October 1916, ten days before his death. The postcard is addressed to Karl Baer. We are thinking that Karl may have been a brother of paul to whom many of our items come from.

Anything connected with Oswald Boelcke is historic but this goes beyond that with two of his signatures, a unit stamp for Jasta 2, and being so close to his death.