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PRUSSIA – PICKELHAUBE – OFFICER – INFANTERIE REGIMENT Nr 87

SKU: 04-667

$6,995.00

Today we are offering you something really “tasty.” It is a 1. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 87 officer’s pickelhaube. The Duchy of Nassau’s entire military force consisted of the previous regiment and its sister, 2. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 88. Several smaller “Nassau” counties had been combined in 1806 to produce the new Duchy, due to Napoleon’s prodding (in his capacity as the Confederation of the Rhine’s “Protector”). Both regiments saw action during 1815’s Battle of Waterloo against Napoleon (more about that later).
I lusted after this pickelhaube as soon as it was offered. Most of you are well aware that I have ZERO interest in poorly-conditioned helmets, and that my standards for ORIGINALITY and CONDITION are fierce. The helmet, however, more than exceeded my expectations and filled me with admiration. A dull black finish covers its entire leather body, which is close to absolute perfection. One tiny little circular ding (measuring about 1/8″) shows up near the Reich’s kokarde. It easily can be missed if one does not pay close attention. All of the helmet’s furniture is gilt, including the wappen, the flat chin scales, the trim, the officer’s stars, and the spike.
[Interestingly, the spike is a bit taller than those usually found on Prussian helmets. I believe it can be explained by the helmet’s decidedly NON-Prussian origins. We have already mentioned that our spiked helmet originated from 1. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 87. The Duchy of Nassau belonged to a group of German states (including the Kingdom of Hannover and its vassal state, Braunschweig) that allied with Austria during the 1866 Austro-Prussian War. The group was absorbed by Prussia following the alliance’s (very swift) defeat at the war’s conclusion. From then on, the former Duchy of Nassau’s regiments were considered Prussian units. Then, in 1897, two very important changes occurred that further altered headdresses’ appearance. First, all states began displaying the Reich’s kokarden on all their headdresses, including pickelhauben, tschapkas, busbies, tschakos, mützen, schirmützen, and etc. Prior to that, only the state’s kokarden were displayed. {It was a huge change. Now, from the wearer’s perspective, the state’s kokarde was worn on a pickelhaube’s left side, while the Reich’s kokarde was worn on the right}. The second change affected Austria’s hapless 1866 War allies. The regiments that had been absorbed into the Prussian Army were once again allowed to display on their pickelhauben the bandeaux awarded to them by their former rulers. 1. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 87, which had fought bravely at the Battle of Waterloo, once again proudly displayed their bandeaux touting “La Belle Alliance” on their pickelhauben. That very bandeau is how we identified the helmet’s origin with 1. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 87. Its presence also helps explain the taller, non-Prussian spike].
[We have one more historical aside. Our helmet’s sister regiment, 2. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 88, displayed bandeaux for “La Belle Alliance, Mesa de Ibor, and Medellin.” It had previously fought with Wellington during the Peninsula Campaign. Both Nassau regiments (totaling some 3,000 men) stood and held at “La Belle Alliance,” a Belgian inn that was Napoleon’s headquarters until he joined his troops in the field. Ferocious fighting broke out near the inn, and the Nassau men suffered serious casualties. After the battle was won, German Generalfeldmarschall Gebhard Blücher suggested that the overall conflict be known as the Battle of La Belle Alliance. The English commander, the Duke of Wellington, objected that it was bad form to name a battle after the losing commander’s headquarters. Ultimately, it came to be known as the Battle of Waterloo].
The pickelhaube’s wappen displays a fine, frosted finish. The gold and black “La Belle Alliance” bandeau makes a good contrast against it. The correct state’s (Prussian) and Reich’s kokarden are in place.
The interior boasts a gently-used, light-brown, leather sweatband. A light-beige silk liner, also in top condition, is attached. A few perspiration stains appear, but the actual silk liner is excellent. When one pulls the liner’s two halves apart to look underneath, all of the correct hardware is in place. More important, NO double holes show up where the wappen attaches to the helmet’s body. A penciled-in “55” indicates the helmet’s size.
This spiked helmet is in absolutely beautiful condition. You will have to search long and hard to find a better one.

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Today we are offering you something really “tasty.” It is a 1. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 87 officer’s pickelhaube. The Duchy of Nassau’s entire military force consisted of the previous regiment and its sister, 2. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 88. Several smaller “Nassau” counties had been combined in 1806 to produce the new Duchy, due to Napoleon’s prodding (in his capacity as the Confederation of the Rhine’s “Protector”). Both regiments saw action during 1815’s Battle of Waterloo against Napoleon (more about that later).
I lusted after this pickelhaube as soon as it was offered. Most of you are well aware that I have ZERO interest in poorly-conditioned helmets, and that my standards for ORIGINALITY and CONDITION are fierce. The helmet, however, more than exceeded my expectations and filled me with admiration. A dull black finish covers its entire leather body, which is close to absolute perfection. One tiny little circular ding (measuring about 1/8″) shows up near the Reich’s kokarde. It easily can be missed if one does not pay close attention. All of the helmet’s furniture is gilt, including the wappen, the flat chin scales, the trim, the officer’s stars, and the spike.
[Interestingly, the spike is a bit taller than those usually found on Prussian helmets. I believe it can be explained by the helmet’s decidedly NON-Prussian origins. We have already mentioned that our spiked helmet originated from 1. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 87. The Duchy of Nassau belonged to a group of German states (including the Kingdom of Hannover and its vassal state, Braunschweig) that allied with Austria during the 1866 Austro-Prussian War. The group was absorbed by Prussia following the alliance’s (very swift) defeat at the war’s conclusion. From then on, the former Duchy of Nassau’s regiments were considered Prussian units. Then, in 1897, two very important changes occurred that further altered headdresses’ appearance. First, all states began displaying the Reich’s kokarden on all their headdresses, including pickelhauben, tschapkas, busbies, tschakos, mützen, schirmützen, and etc. Prior to that, only the state’s kokarden were displayed. {It was a huge change. Now, from the wearer’s perspective, the state’s kokarde was worn on a pickelhaube’s left side, while the Reich’s kokarde was worn on the right}. The second change affected Austria’s hapless 1866 War allies. The regiments that had been absorbed into the Prussian Army were once again allowed to display on their pickelhauben the bandeaux awarded to them by their former rulers. 1. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 87, which had fought bravely at the Battle of Waterloo, once again proudly displayed their bandeaux touting “La Belle Alliance” on their pickelhauben. That very bandeau is how we identified the helmet’s origin with 1. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 87. Its presence also helps explain the taller, non-Prussian spike].
[We have one more historical aside. Our helmet’s sister regiment, 2. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 88, displayed bandeaux for “La Belle Alliance, Mesa de Ibor, and Medellin.” It had previously fought with Wellington during the Peninsula Campaign. Both Nassau regiments (totaling some 3,000 men) stood and held at “La Belle Alliance,” a Belgian inn that was Napoleon’s headquarters until he joined his troops in the field. Ferocious fighting broke out near the inn, and the Nassau men suffered serious casualties. After the battle was won, German Generalfeldmarschall Gebhard Blücher suggested that the overall conflict be known as the Battle of La Belle Alliance. The English commander, the Duke of Wellington, objected that it was bad form to name a battle after the losing commander’s headquarters. Ultimately, it came to be known as the Battle of Waterloo].
The pickelhaube’s wappen displays a fine, frosted finish. The gold and black “La Belle Alliance” bandeau makes a good contrast against it. The correct state’s (Prussian) and Reich’s kokarden are in place.
The interior boasts a gently-used, light-brown, leather sweatband. A light-beige silk liner, also in top condition, is attached. A few perspiration stains appear, but the actual silk liner is excellent. When one pulls the liner’s two halves apart to look underneath, all of the correct hardware is in place. More important, NO double holes show up where the wappen attaches to the helmet’s body. A penciled-in “55” indicates the helmet’s size.
This spiked helmet is in absolutely beautiful condition. You will have to search long and hard to find a better one.

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Description

Today we are offering you something really “tasty.” It is a 1. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 87 officer’s pickelhaube. The Duchy of Nassau’s entire military force consisted of the previous regiment and its sister, 2. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 88. Several smaller “Nassau” counties had been combined in 1806 to produce the new Duchy, due to Napoleon’s prodding (in his capacity as the Confederation of the Rhine’s “Protector”). Both regiments saw action during 1815’s Battle of Waterloo against Napoleon (more about that later).
I lusted after this pickelhaube as soon as it was offered. Most of you are well aware that I have ZERO interest in poorly-conditioned helmets, and that my standards for ORIGINALITY and CONDITION are fierce. The helmet, however, more than exceeded my expectations and filled me with admiration. A dull black finish covers its entire leather body, which is close to absolute perfection. One tiny little circular ding (measuring about 1/8″) shows up near the Reich’s kokarde. It easily can be missed if one does not pay close attention. All of the helmet’s furniture is gilt, including the wappen, the flat chin scales, the trim, the officer’s stars, and the spike.
[Interestingly, the spike is a bit taller than those usually found on Prussian helmets. I believe it can be explained by the helmet’s decidedly NON-Prussian origins. We have already mentioned that our spiked helmet originated from 1. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 87. The Duchy of Nassau belonged to a group of German states (including the Kingdom of Hannover and its vassal state, Braunschweig) that allied with Austria during the 1866 Austro-Prussian War. The group was absorbed by Prussia following the alliance’s (very swift) defeat at the war’s conclusion. From then on, the former Duchy of Nassau’s regiments were considered Prussian units. Then, in 1897, two very important changes occurred that further altered headdresses’ appearance. First, all states began displaying the Reich’s kokarden on all their headdresses, including pickelhauben, tschapkas, busbies, tschakos, mützen, schirmützen, and etc. Prior to that, only the state’s kokarden were displayed. {It was a huge change. Now, from the wearer’s perspective, the state’s kokarde was worn on a pickelhaube’s left side, while the Reich’s kokarde was worn on the right}. The second change affected Austria’s hapless 1866 War allies. The regiments that had been absorbed into the Prussian Army were once again allowed to display on their pickelhauben the bandeaux awarded to them by their former rulers. 1. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 87, which had fought bravely at the Battle of Waterloo, once again proudly displayed their bandeaux touting “La Belle Alliance” on their pickelhauben. That very bandeau is how we identified the helmet’s origin with 1. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 87. Its presence also helps explain the taller, non-Prussian spike].
[We have one more historical aside. Our helmet’s sister regiment, 2. Nassauisches-Infanterie-Regiment Nr 88, displayed bandeaux for “La Belle Alliance, Mesa de Ibor, and Medellin.” It had previously fought with Wellington during the Peninsula Campaign. Both Nassau regiments (totaling some 3,000 men) stood and held at “La Belle Alliance,” a Belgian inn that was Napoleon’s headquarters until he joined his troops in the field. Ferocious fighting broke out near the inn, and the Nassau men suffered serious casualties. After the battle was won, German Generalfeldmarschall Gebhard Blücher suggested that the overall conflict be known as the Battle of La Belle Alliance. The English commander, the Duke of Wellington, objected that it was bad form to name a battle after the losing commander’s headquarters. Ultimately, it came to be known as the Battle of Waterloo].
The pickelhaube’s wappen displays a fine, frosted finish. The gold and black “La Belle Alliance” bandeau makes a good contrast against it. The correct state’s (Prussian) and Reich’s kokarden are in place.
The interior boasts a gently-used, light-brown, leather sweatband. A light-beige silk liner, also in top condition, is attached. A few perspiration stains appear, but the actual silk liner is excellent. When one pulls the liner’s two halves apart to look underneath, all of the correct hardware is in place. More important, NO double holes show up where the wappen attaches to the helmet’s body. A penciled-in “55” indicates the helmet’s size.
This spiked helmet is in absolutely beautiful condition. You will have to search long and hard to find a better one.