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FLAG – PRUSSIA – INFANTERIE-REGIMENT STANDARD

SKU: 25-66 XDK

$21,995.00

This is a consignment item. The traditions behind the standards (regimental flags) are one of the more interesting stories of Imperial German Militaria. The history and honor of any regiment were tied to its regimental banners. Each infantry regiment was composed of three Bataillons, and ten to twelve companies. Each Bataillon in the regiment had its own standard and standard bearer (Fahnenträger), who proudly carried his Bataillon’s flag. It was a great honor to do so. To begin with, the man usually was a senior NCO. He was attended by two Bataillon officers. During Napoleonic times, for example, the absolute worst fate any combatant nations’ Bataillon or regiment could suffer was to lose its standard to the enemy in battle. Defeat was bad enough, but losing a standard was a total catastrophe. The dishonor to that Bataillon/regiment was incalculable. The Bataillon/regiment’s commander would be seriously reconsidered by his superiors for this terrible event. It could well lead to a military career’s end. The pomp and ceremony around a regimental standard began with its award to the Bataillon/regiment. During Kaiser Wilhelm II’s time, the awarding of such flags was a major function. The Kaiser personally issued the flag to the Bataillon/regiment. An assortment of medallions on the flag pole commemorated the award and other important unit events. The flag pole was also decorated with a special streamer listing the year and other basic information about the regiment. Furthermore, special streamers were attached for any of the regiment’s battle honors. This included battles from the Napoleonic Wars (Waterloo and campaigns in Spain and Portugal were especially prized), the 1864 Danish-Prussian War, the 1866 Austro-Prussian War, and the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian War. In the case of the Franco-Prussian War, in addition to any battle honors/streamers awarded, each regiment participating in the war received a special flag topper consisting of an 1870 Grand Cross of the Iron Cross. (This decoration, which was awarded on a limited basis to generals only during the war, is seldom-seen and very expensive). When a man was mustered into a regiment, he swore allegiance to his Kaiser, his fatherland, and his regiment at the regimental flag. The gentleman who has consigned this standard to us advises that approximately thirty infantry regiments employed this particular standard style. Taking into consideration that each regiment had three standards, the maximum was ninety. They were carefully controlled. If one became unserviceable during its “life,” it was retired from service and a new one was presented by the Kaiser to the Bataillon/regiment. I have spoken with advanced collectors who have regimental standards in their collections. I found it interesting that many of them were captured at the end of WW II and sent to Russia. In the 1980’s or 1990’s, an American-made contact with a museum in the Soviet Union and arrangements were made to release many of them. Naturally, many of them immediately made their way to German museum collections, where they are on display today. A small number of the freed standards found their way into the hands of collectors, which is what we offer you today. How rare are these regimental standards? VERY rare. I have seen a small number of them firsthand (they are breathtaking). This is the first time I have ever offered one to you. Some of the other rare Imperial German Militaria items can be seen more frequently, as they were available by the hundreds or perhaps even by a thousand, depending on the item. Again, this flag was one of perhaps NINETY! From that, deduct the number (your guess is as good as mine on this) that were destroyed during two World Wars. All that survived are perhaps more than one-hundred-years-old by now. I promise you; you will not see these available often. This, ladies and gentlemen is history and I mean, real HISTORY! Banners such as these were produced from silk and embroidered with various colors of bullion. The banner measures 49″ x 52 1/4.” The flag’s background is white, although being one-hundred-years-old (probably a bit older) it is no longer as snowy white as it once was. The flag weighs 1 pound and 15 ounces. The flag’s central theme on the obverse is a multicolored Hohenzollern Eagle. The Eagle is crowned, with widespread wings. It clasps a sword in one talon and a bundle of thunderbolts in the other. It is enclosed in a laurel leaf wreath. The wreath is in turn topped by a large Hohenzollern Crown. Within the wreath, just above the Eagle, is the motto “Pro-Gloria-Et-Patria” which translates to “For Glory and Fatherland.” This was Prussia’s motto. From the central wreath eight diagonal stripes extend to the flag’s four corners. In each of the four corners is a smaller crowned wreath that holds the Kaiser’s cypher. Let us turn for a moment to the standard’s condition, which we will carefully highlight in the large number of photographs that accompany our description. The banner is full and complete. Since it is made of silk, a number of tears and also several holes appear. In the lower left corner you will see partial netting over the crowned cypher. This was done here and generally over the entire flag to offer extra support. I mentioned the weight (1 pound and 15 ounces) earlier. It is important to remember as the weight put a lot of pressure on the flag and made it susceptible to advancing problems as tears and rips developed. The weight is mostly due to the flag’s elaborate bullion in the center and corners. It adds a great deal of weight to an already heavy silk banner. The bullion work is breathtaking. Again, I ask you to pay special attention to the attached photographs. If you look at the flag’s far left side, you will see where it was attached to the flagpole, and where a material flap has partially separated from the flag’s body. The flap folded over the flagpole, however, and you can see the many holes where it was attached. The flag’s reverse is identical, although we will take photos of both sides. This is a truly amazing artifact. You must remember that very few of these have survived, and this flag is historically, very IMPORTANT. I am honored to share it with you on Der Rittmeister Militaria’s web site pages.

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This is a consignment item. The traditions behind the standards (regimental flags) are one of the more interesting stories of Imperial German Militaria. The history and honor of any regiment were tied to its regimental banners. Each infantry regiment was composed of three Bataillons, and ten to twelve companies. Each Bataillon in the regiment had its own standard and standard bearer (Fahnenträger), who proudly carried his Bataillon’s flag. It was a great honor to do so. To begin with, the man usually was a senior NCO. He was attended by two Bataillon officers. During Napoleonic times, for example, the absolute worst fate any combatant nations’ Bataillon or regiment could suffer was to lose its standard to the enemy in battle. Defeat was bad enough, but losing a standard was a total catastrophe. The dishonor to that Bataillon/regiment was incalculable. The Bataillon/regiment’s commander would be seriously reconsidered by his superiors for this terrible event. It could well lead to a military career’s end. The pomp and ceremony around a regimental standard began with its award to the Bataillon/regiment. During Kaiser Wilhelm II’s time, the awarding of such flags was a major function. The Kaiser personally issued the flag to the Bataillon/regiment. An assortment of medallions on the flag pole commemorated the award and other important unit events. The flag pole was also decorated with a special streamer listing the year and other basic information about the regiment. Furthermore, special streamers were attached for any of the regiment’s battle honors. This included battles from the Napoleonic Wars (Waterloo and campaigns in Spain and Portugal were especially prized), the 1864 Danish-Prussian War, the 1866 Austro-Prussian War, and the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian War. In the case of the Franco-Prussian War, in addition to any battle honors/streamers awarded, each regiment participating in the war received a special flag topper consisting of an 1870 Grand Cross of the Iron Cross. (This decoration, which was awarded on a limited basis to generals only during the war, is seldom-seen and very expensive). When a man was mustered into a regiment, he swore allegiance to his Kaiser, his fatherland, and his regiment at the regimental flag. The gentleman who has consigned this standard to us advises that approximately thirty infantry regiments employed this particular standard style. Taking into consideration that each regiment had three standards, the maximum was ninety. They were carefully controlled. If one became unserviceable during its “life,” it was retired from service and a new one was presented by the Kaiser to the Bataillon/regiment. I have spoken with advanced collectors who have regimental standards in their collections. I found it interesting that many of them were captured at the end of WW II and sent to Russia. In the 1980’s or 1990’s, an American-made contact with a museum in the Soviet Union and arrangements were made to release many of them. Naturally, many of them immediately made their way to German museum collections, where they are on display today. A small number of the freed standards found their way into the hands of collectors, which is what we offer you today. How rare are these regimental standards? VERY rare. I have seen a small number of them firsthand (they are breathtaking). This is the first time I have ever offered one to you. Some of the other rare Imperial German Militaria items can be seen more frequently, as they were available by the hundreds or perhaps even by a thousand, depending on the item. Again, this flag was one of perhaps NINETY! From that, deduct the number (your guess is as good as mine on this) that were destroyed during two World Wars. All that survived are perhaps more than one-hundred-years-old by now. I promise you; you will not see these available often. This, ladies and gentlemen is history and I mean, real HISTORY! Banners such as these were produced from silk and embroidered with various colors of bullion. The banner measures 49″ x 52 1/4.” The flag’s background is white, although being one-hundred-years-old (probably a bit older) it is no longer as snowy white as it once was. The flag weighs 1 pound and 15 ounces. The flag’s central theme on the obverse is a multicolored Hohenzollern Eagle. The Eagle is crowned, with widespread wings. It clasps a sword in one talon and a bundle of thunderbolts in the other. It is enclosed in a laurel leaf wreath. The wreath is in turn topped by a large Hohenzollern Crown. Within the wreath, just above the Eagle, is the motto “Pro-Gloria-Et-Patria” which translates to “For Glory and Fatherland.” This was Prussia’s motto. From the central wreath eight diagonal stripes extend to the flag’s four corners. In each of the four corners is a smaller crowned wreath that holds the Kaiser’s cypher. Let us turn for a moment to the standard’s condition, which we will carefully highlight in the large number of photographs that accompany our description. The banner is full and complete. Since it is made of silk, a number of tears and also several holes appear. In the lower left corner you will see partial netting over the crowned cypher. This was done here and generally over the entire flag to offer extra support. I mentioned the weight (1 pound and 15 ounces) earlier. It is important to remember as the weight put a lot of pressure on the flag and made it susceptible to advancing problems as tears and rips developed. The weight is mostly due to the flag’s elaborate bullion in the center and corners. It adds a great deal of weight to an already heavy silk banner. The bullion work is breathtaking. Again, I ask you to pay special attention to the attached photographs. If you look at the flag’s far left side, you will see where it was attached to the flagpole, and where a material flap has partially separated from the flag’s body. The flap folded over the flagpole, however, and you can see the many holes where it was attached. The flag’s reverse is identical, although we will take photos of both sides. This is a truly amazing artifact. You must remember that very few of these have survived, and this flag is historically, very IMPORTANT. I am honored to share it with you on Der Rittmeister Militaria’s web site pages.

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Description

This is a consignment item. The traditions behind the standards (regimental flags) are one of the more interesting stories of Imperial German Militaria. The history and honor of any regiment were tied to its regimental banners. Each infantry regiment was composed of three Bataillons, and ten to twelve companies. Each Bataillon in the regiment had its own standard and standard bearer (Fahnenträger), who proudly carried his Bataillon’s flag. It was a great honor to do so. To begin with, the man usually was a senior NCO. He was attended by two Bataillon officers. During Napoleonic times, for example, the absolute worst fate any combatant nations’ Bataillon or regiment could suffer was to lose its standard to the enemy in battle. Defeat was bad enough, but losing a standard was a total catastrophe. The dishonor to that Bataillon/regiment was incalculable. The Bataillon/regiment’s commander would be seriously reconsidered by his superiors for this terrible event. It could well lead to a military career’s end. The pomp and ceremony around a regimental standard began with its award to the Bataillon/regiment. During Kaiser Wilhelm II’s time, the awarding of such flags was a major function. The Kaiser personally issued the flag to the Bataillon/regiment. An assortment of medallions on the flag pole commemorated the award and other important unit events. The flag pole was also decorated with a special streamer listing the year and other basic information about the regiment. Furthermore, special streamers were attached for any of the regiment’s battle honors. This included battles from the Napoleonic Wars (Waterloo and campaigns in Spain and Portugal were especially prized), the 1864 Danish-Prussian War, the 1866 Austro-Prussian War, and the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian War. In the case of the Franco-Prussian War, in addition to any battle honors/streamers awarded, each regiment participating in the war received a special flag topper consisting of an 1870 Grand Cross of the Iron Cross. (This decoration, which was awarded on a limited basis to generals only during the war, is seldom-seen and very expensive). When a man was mustered into a regiment, he swore allegiance to his Kaiser, his fatherland, and his regiment at the regimental flag. The gentleman who has consigned this standard to us advises that approximately thirty infantry regiments employed this particular standard style. Taking into consideration that each regiment had three standards, the maximum was ninety. They were carefully controlled. If one became unserviceable during its “life,” it was retired from service and a new one was presented by the Kaiser to the Bataillon/regiment. I have spoken with advanced collectors who have regimental standards in their collections. I found it interesting that many of them were captured at the end of WW II and sent to Russia. In the 1980’s or 1990’s, an American-made contact with a museum in the Soviet Union and arrangements were made to release many of them. Naturally, many of them immediately made their way to German museum collections, where they are on display today. A small number of the freed standards found their way into the hands of collectors, which is what we offer you today. How rare are these regimental standards? VERY rare. I have seen a small number of them firsthand (they are breathtaking). This is the first time I have ever offered one to you. Some of the other rare Imperial German Militaria items can be seen more frequently, as they were available by the hundreds or perhaps even by a thousand, depending on the item. Again, this flag was one of perhaps NINETY! From that, deduct the number (your guess is as good as mine on this) that were destroyed during two World Wars. All that survived are perhaps more than one-hundred-years-old by now. I promise you; you will not see these available often. This, ladies and gentlemen is history and I mean, real HISTORY! Banners such as these were produced from silk and embroidered with various colors of bullion. The banner measures 49″ x 52 1/4.” The flag’s background is white, although being one-hundred-years-old (probably a bit older) it is no longer as snowy white as it once was. The flag weighs 1 pound and 15 ounces. The flag’s central theme on the obverse is a multicolored Hohenzollern Eagle. The Eagle is crowned, with widespread wings. It clasps a sword in one talon and a bundle of thunderbolts in the other. It is enclosed in a laurel leaf wreath. The wreath is in turn topped by a large Hohenzollern Crown. Within the wreath, just above the Eagle, is the motto “Pro-Gloria-Et-Patria” which translates to “For Glory and Fatherland.” This was Prussia’s motto. From the central wreath eight diagonal stripes extend to the flag’s four corners. In each of the four corners is a smaller crowned wreath that holds the Kaiser’s cypher. Let us turn for a moment to the standard’s condition, which we will carefully highlight in the large number of photographs that accompany our description. The banner is full and complete. Since it is made of silk, a number of tears and also several holes appear. In the lower left corner you will see partial netting over the crowned cypher. This was done here and generally over the entire flag to offer extra support. I mentioned the weight (1 pound and 15 ounces) earlier. It is important to remember as the weight put a lot of pressure on the flag and made it susceptible to advancing problems as tears and rips developed. The weight is mostly due to the flag’s elaborate bullion in the center and corners. It adds a great deal of weight to an already heavy silk banner. The bullion work is breathtaking. Again, I ask you to pay special attention to the attached photographs. If you look at the flag’s far left side, you will see where it was attached to the flagpole, and where a material flap has partially separated from the flag’s body. The flap folded over the flagpole, however, and you can see the many holes where it was attached. The flag’s reverse is identical, although we will take photos of both sides. This is a truly amazing artifact. You must remember that very few of these have survived, and this flag is historically, very IMPORTANT. I am honored to share it with you on Der Rittmeister Militaria’s web site pages.

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