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KAISER WILHELM II’S PERSONAL NAVY SEE-BATAILLON GENERALFELDMARSCHALL’S TSCHAKO IN FULL PARADE CONFIGURATION – COMPLETE WITH PARADE FEATHERS AND TWO STORAGE BOXES.

SKU: 20-173

$42,495.00

Today we are offering perhaps the single most important artifact ever in the history of Der Rittmeister Militaria. In our day we have offered many fine articles of headdress, tunics, etc. from Germany’s royals. We even have offered several schirmützen that once belonged to Kaiser Wilhelm II, but never anything quite like this! Today we are pleased and honored to present his Majesty Kaiser Wilhelm II’s original officer’s tschako for the See-Bataillon.
As you are well aware, the See-Bataillon was attached to the Kaiserliche Marine, much as the U.S. Marine Corps is to the U. S. Navy and the British Royal Marines are to Her Majesty’s Royal Navy. The See-Bataillon provided shipboard security for the German Imperial Navy’s larger vessels. They were also charged with providing security at many German embassies and consulates around the world. In China one entire Bataillon (Bataillon Nr 3) was assigned as the embassy’s security force, and as additional military muscle to bolster the area’s other colonial troops. Our premiere offering today is the complete ensemble for the Kaiser’s See-Bataillon tschako.
The tschako’s body consists of superb felt for the body portion, and fine leather for its top, as well as the front and rear visors. The See-Bataillon’s wappen is absolutely magnificent. It features an eagle with outspread wings. In the middle of its chest is a smaller Hohenzollern Eagle. Clasped in the larger eagle’s talons is an anchor base. Over its head sits a Hohenzollern Crown, with a royal stole streaming out from either side. The wappen is exquisitely frosted. All of its fire gilding remains intact. The tschako boasts a glorious pair of chin scales. The final exterior detail is its field badge, handsomely crafted of silver bullion. It sports a red center signifying the Reich. The exterior’s condition is excellent. I believe most would agree with me. It is in mint-minus condition.
The back interior visor is green leather. The sweatband is ultra soft doeskin. It exhibits an extra band of stitching that one only sees on top-of-the-line headdress. (Naturally, one expects this from the Kaiser!) Its liner is made from superior quality silk. It has a much tighter weave than that one normally sees. Again, this was an expensive helmet option, but if you were the Kaiser, expenses be damned! Wilhelm II’s gold Cypher is embossed on the silk liner. The entire interior is in excellent condition, with just a hint of gentle wear. In all likelihood, it was worn very rarely during Wilhelm II’s reign (1888 to 1918).
Some manufacturer’s production markings seem to appear under the liner, as well as the size, “55 1/4.” This is around the average hat/helmet size for the period.
Now let us turn to the helmet’s feather bush. The cock feathers are white, red, and black, representing Germany’s national colors. It differs from a Prussian general’s feathers, which are just black and white. This is because the See-Bataillon was considered a national force rather than merely a Prussian unit. (The same held true for the Kaiserliche Marine). The very full cock feathers are attached to a special trichter, which slides in behind the field badge. The entire tschako takes on an entirely different look when the parade feathers are attached. Accompanying the parade feathers is an officer’s regular horsehair bush. It is a very full and beautifully-shaped. Should you to want to attach the bush, you will need to dismount the feathers. This is because only one of these very special trichters is included. Personally, I cannot imagine why one would wish to do so. The bush comes with the ensemble, however. It will be yours to do with as you wish when you purchase it. Another part of the ensemble is the tschako’s and parade feathers’ storage boxes. The tschako’s box measures 9″ x 11″ x 8.” The box front displays a special-added label that reads “SeeBataillon.” Immediately above the unit designation appears Wilhelm II’s similarly Hohenzollern-Crowned Cypher. The box is lined in white silk. The tschako rests inside the box, along with the field badge and the extra, horsehair parade bush. Originally, a leather strap secured the top to the box. Only a remnant of the leather strap remains.
The last piece of the presentation is a special, cylindrically-shaped case, which houses the parade feathers when they are not in use. I have seen similar cases in the past, housing generals’ trichters and feathers. Such cases always are far larger and more ornate than boxes holding lower officers’ horsehair trichters. This one has openings on both ends to facilitate removing and replacing the bush. The ends are appropriately marked “Oben (top)” and “Unten (bottom).” The box stands 11 3/4″ high. It is 6 3/4″ in diameter at the base. Its side displays a similar label to that seen on the tschako’s box, identifying it as Kaiser Wilhelm II’s property.
Again, we are extremely excited to share this with you. One often hears the term “museum piece” or “museum grade.” This certainly applies here. Any collector fortunate enough to have this in his collection (as I do now), is the caretaker of a truly historic piece. I know many of you will flinch at its price. It is expensive, of that we have no doubt. In comparison, two or three years ago I was offered one of Wilhelm II’s feldgrau tunics and an army general pickelhaube. The price to me would have been €50,000. At today’s prices that would equal $74,000+! [Please allow sufficient time for the attached photographs to load. I believe you will find the wait well worth it]!

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Today we are offering perhaps the single most important artifact ever in the history of Der Rittmeister Militaria. In our day we have offered many fine articles of headdress, tunics, etc. from Germany’s royals. We even have offered several schirmützen that once belonged to Kaiser Wilhelm II, but never anything quite like this! Today we are pleased and honored to present his Majesty Kaiser Wilhelm II’s original officer’s tschako for the See-Bataillon.
As you are well aware, the See-Bataillon was attached to the Kaiserliche Marine, much as the U.S. Marine Corps is to the U. S. Navy and the British Royal Marines are to Her Majesty’s Royal Navy. The See-Bataillon provided shipboard security for the German Imperial Navy’s larger vessels. They were also charged with providing security at many German embassies and consulates around the world. In China one entire Bataillon (Bataillon Nr 3) was assigned as the embassy’s security force, and as additional military muscle to bolster the area’s other colonial troops. Our premiere offering today is the complete ensemble for the Kaiser’s See-Bataillon tschako.
The tschako’s body consists of superb felt for the body portion, and fine leather for its top, as well as the front and rear visors. The See-Bataillon’s wappen is absolutely magnificent. It features an eagle with outspread wings. In the middle of its chest is a smaller Hohenzollern Eagle. Clasped in the larger eagle’s talons is an anchor base. Over its head sits a Hohenzollern Crown, with a royal stole streaming out from either side. The wappen is exquisitely frosted. All of its fire gilding remains intact. The tschako boasts a glorious pair of chin scales. The final exterior detail is its field badge, handsomely crafted of silver bullion. It sports a red center signifying the Reich. The exterior’s condition is excellent. I believe most would agree with me. It is in mint-minus condition.
The back interior visor is green leather. The sweatband is ultra soft doeskin. It exhibits an extra band of stitching that one only sees on top-of-the-line headdress. (Naturally, one expects this from the Kaiser!) Its liner is made from superior quality silk. It has a much tighter weave than that one normally sees. Again, this was an expensive helmet option, but if you were the Kaiser, expenses be damned! Wilhelm II’s gold Cypher is embossed on the silk liner. The entire interior is in excellent condition, with just a hint of gentle wear. In all likelihood, it was worn very rarely during Wilhelm II’s reign (1888 to 1918).
Some manufacturer’s production markings seem to appear under the liner, as well as the size, “55 1/4.” This is around the average hat/helmet size for the period.
Now let us turn to the helmet’s feather bush. The cock feathers are white, red, and black, representing Germany’s national colors. It differs from a Prussian general’s feathers, which are just black and white. This is because the See-Bataillon was considered a national force rather than merely a Prussian unit. (The same held true for the Kaiserliche Marine). The very full cock feathers are attached to a special trichter, which slides in behind the field badge. The entire tschako takes on an entirely different look when the parade feathers are attached. Accompanying the parade feathers is an officer’s regular horsehair bush. It is a very full and beautifully-shaped. Should you to want to attach the bush, you will need to dismount the feathers. This is because only one of these very special trichters is included. Personally, I cannot imagine why one would wish to do so. The bush comes with the ensemble, however. It will be yours to do with as you wish when you purchase it. Another part of the ensemble is the tschako’s and parade feathers’ storage boxes. The tschako’s box measures 9″ x 11″ x 8.” The box front displays a special-added label that reads “SeeBataillon.” Immediately above the unit designation appears Wilhelm II’s similarly Hohenzollern-Crowned Cypher. The box is lined in white silk. The tschako rests inside the box, along with the field badge and the extra, horsehair parade bush. Originally, a leather strap secured the top to the box. Only a remnant of the leather strap remains.
The last piece of the presentation is a special, cylindrically-shaped case, which houses the parade feathers when they are not in use. I have seen similar cases in the past, housing generals’ trichters and feathers. Such cases always are far larger and more ornate than boxes holding lower officers’ horsehair trichters. This one has openings on both ends to facilitate removing and replacing the bush. The ends are appropriately marked “Oben (top)” and “Unten (bottom).” The box stands 11 3/4″ high. It is 6 3/4″ in diameter at the base. Its side displays a similar label to that seen on the tschako’s box, identifying it as Kaiser Wilhelm II’s property.
Again, we are extremely excited to share this with you. One often hears the term “museum piece” or “museum grade.” This certainly applies here. Any collector fortunate enough to have this in his collection (as I do now), is the caretaker of a truly historic piece. I know many of you will flinch at its price. It is expensive, of that we have no doubt. In comparison, two or three years ago I was offered one of Wilhelm II’s feldgrau tunics and an army general pickelhaube. The price to me would have been €50,000. At today’s prices that would equal $74,000+! [Please allow sufficient time for the attached photographs to load. I believe you will find the wait well worth it]!

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Description

Today we are offering perhaps the single most important artifact ever in the history of Der Rittmeister Militaria. In our day we have offered many fine articles of headdress, tunics, etc. from Germany’s royals. We even have offered several schirmützen that once belonged to Kaiser Wilhelm II, but never anything quite like this! Today we are pleased and honored to present his Majesty Kaiser Wilhelm II’s original officer’s tschako for the See-Bataillon.
As you are well aware, the See-Bataillon was attached to the Kaiserliche Marine, much as the U.S. Marine Corps is to the U. S. Navy and the British Royal Marines are to Her Majesty’s Royal Navy. The See-Bataillon provided shipboard security for the German Imperial Navy’s larger vessels. They were also charged with providing security at many German embassies and consulates around the world. In China one entire Bataillon (Bataillon Nr 3) was assigned as the embassy’s security force, and as additional military muscle to bolster the area’s other colonial troops. Our premiere offering today is the complete ensemble for the Kaiser’s See-Bataillon tschako.
The tschako’s body consists of superb felt for the body portion, and fine leather for its top, as well as the front and rear visors. The See-Bataillon’s wappen is absolutely magnificent. It features an eagle with outspread wings. In the middle of its chest is a smaller Hohenzollern Eagle. Clasped in the larger eagle’s talons is an anchor base. Over its head sits a Hohenzollern Crown, with a royal stole streaming out from either side. The wappen is exquisitely frosted. All of its fire gilding remains intact. The tschako boasts a glorious pair of chin scales. The final exterior detail is its field badge, handsomely crafted of silver bullion. It sports a red center signifying the Reich. The exterior’s condition is excellent. I believe most would agree with me. It is in mint-minus condition.
The back interior visor is green leather. The sweatband is ultra soft doeskin. It exhibits an extra band of stitching that one only sees on top-of-the-line headdress. (Naturally, one expects this from the Kaiser!) Its liner is made from superior quality silk. It has a much tighter weave than that one normally sees. Again, this was an expensive helmet option, but if you were the Kaiser, expenses be damned! Wilhelm II’s gold Cypher is embossed on the silk liner. The entire interior is in excellent condition, with just a hint of gentle wear. In all likelihood, it was worn very rarely during Wilhelm II’s reign (1888 to 1918).
Some manufacturer’s production markings seem to appear under the liner, as well as the size, “55 1/4.” This is around the average hat/helmet size for the period.
Now let us turn to the helmet’s feather bush. The cock feathers are white, red, and black, representing Germany’s national colors. It differs from a Prussian general’s feathers, which are just black and white. This is because the See-Bataillon was considered a national force rather than merely a Prussian unit. (The same held true for the Kaiserliche Marine). The very full cock feathers are attached to a special trichter, which slides in behind the field badge. The entire tschako takes on an entirely different look when the parade feathers are attached. Accompanying the parade feathers is an officer’s regular horsehair bush. It is a very full and beautifully-shaped. Should you to want to attach the bush, you will need to dismount the feathers. This is because only one of these very special trichters is included. Personally, I cannot imagine why one would wish to do so. The bush comes with the ensemble, however. It will be yours to do with as you wish when you purchase it. Another part of the ensemble is the tschako’s and parade feathers’ storage boxes. The tschako’s box measures 9″ x 11″ x 8.” The box front displays a special-added label that reads “SeeBataillon.” Immediately above the unit designation appears Wilhelm II’s similarly Hohenzollern-Crowned Cypher. The box is lined in white silk. The tschako rests inside the box, along with the field badge and the extra, horsehair parade bush. Originally, a leather strap secured the top to the box. Only a remnant of the leather strap remains.
The last piece of the presentation is a special, cylindrically-shaped case, which houses the parade feathers when they are not in use. I have seen similar cases in the past, housing generals’ trichters and feathers. Such cases always are far larger and more ornate than boxes holding lower officers’ horsehair trichters. This one has openings on both ends to facilitate removing and replacing the bush. The ends are appropriately marked “Oben (top)” and “Unten (bottom).” The box stands 11 3/4″ high. It is 6 3/4″ in diameter at the base. Its side displays a similar label to that seen on the tschako’s box, identifying it as Kaiser Wilhelm II’s property.
Again, we are extremely excited to share this with you. One often hears the term “museum piece” or “museum grade.” This certainly applies here. Any collector fortunate enough to have this in his collection (as I do now), is the caretaker of a truly historic piece. I know many of you will flinch at its price. It is expensive, of that we have no doubt. In comparison, two or three years ago I was offered one of Wilhelm II’s feldgrau tunics and an army general pickelhaube. The price to me would have been €50,000. At today’s prices that would equal $74,000+! [Please allow sufficient time for the attached photographs to load. I believe you will find the wait well worth it]!