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NAVAL STANDARD FOR A PRINZ OF THE HOUSE OF HOHENZOLLERN

SKU: 20-176

$3,495.00

This is an incredible standard/banner that was used on Kaiserliche Marine vessels. The banner proclaimed the presence of a Prinz of the House of Hohenzollern on board. Three Hohenzollern Princes are the most likely to have had this particular flag flown for them. The senior of the three was Großadmiral Prinz Heinrich (1862-1929). He was Kaiser Wilhelm II’s (1859-1941) younger brother. The second was Kaiser Wilhelm II’s son, Prinz Adalbert (1884-1948). The final prince was Prinz Heinrich’s son, Prinz Waldemar (1889-1945). That said, if ANY Hohenzollern Prinz were visiting a ship (even if he served in the Army), this flag would have correctly flown to honor and recognize him. The standard measures a whopping 6’ 11″(83″) x 6’ 6″(78.”) The banner’s center sports a large Hohenzollern Eagle within a shield. Below that is an important symbol of Prussian royalty, the Black Eagle Collar. [An excellent representative of the Collar resides at Haus Doorn, Kaiser Wilhelm II’s residence-in-exile, in the Netherlands. The last example I saw on the market, which had belonged to the King of Bulgaria, sold with its presentation case for more than $100,000!] Above it all sits a red and gold Hohenzollern Crown. The entire arrangement is superimposed on a large Iron Cross measuring 5′ 11″ (71″) x 6′ 6″(78.”) Two more smaller Hohenzollern Crowns appear to the right of the shield. The upper left and lower right corners feature smaller Hohenzollern Eagles. Two repair patches show in the upper and lower right corners. No tearing or rips are apparent, although substantial fading has occurred from exposure to the elements. The standard’s right side displays a lanyard and other fittings by which it can be attached to a ship’s halyard. Normally, members of the royal house only visited battleships and battle cruisers, so typically one would not see this banner on a small vessel. The flag is somewhat similar to the Kaiser’s Standard, but some differences exist. Its overall condition is average, or a bit better. This is not an unused, or mint flag. It has seen service. It exhibits the expected wear a cotton item such as this experiences when exposed to salt air, salt water, smoke, etc. It is a great item for any royal or naval collection.

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This is an incredible standard/banner that was used on Kaiserliche Marine vessels. The banner proclaimed the presence of a Prinz of the House of Hohenzollern on board. Three Hohenzollern Princes are the most likely to have had this particular flag flown for them. The senior of the three was Großadmiral Prinz Heinrich (1862-1929). He was Kaiser Wilhelm II’s (1859-1941) younger brother. The second was Kaiser Wilhelm II’s son, Prinz Adalbert (1884-1948). The final prince was Prinz Heinrich’s son, Prinz Waldemar (1889-1945). That said, if ANY Hohenzollern Prinz were visiting a ship (even if he served in the Army), this flag would have correctly flown to honor and recognize him. The standard measures a whopping 6’ 11″(83″) x 6’ 6″(78.”) The banner’s center sports a large Hohenzollern Eagle within a shield. Below that is an important symbol of Prussian royalty, the Black Eagle Collar. [An excellent representative of the Collar resides at Haus Doorn, Kaiser Wilhelm II’s residence-in-exile, in the Netherlands. The last example I saw on the market, which had belonged to the King of Bulgaria, sold with its presentation case for more than $100,000!] Above it all sits a red and gold Hohenzollern Crown. The entire arrangement is superimposed on a large Iron Cross measuring 5′ 11″ (71″) x 6′ 6″(78.”) Two more smaller Hohenzollern Crowns appear to the right of the shield. The upper left and lower right corners feature smaller Hohenzollern Eagles. Two repair patches show in the upper and lower right corners. No tearing or rips are apparent, although substantial fading has occurred from exposure to the elements. The standard’s right side displays a lanyard and other fittings by which it can be attached to a ship’s halyard. Normally, members of the royal house only visited battleships and battle cruisers, so typically one would not see this banner on a small vessel. The flag is somewhat similar to the Kaiser’s Standard, but some differences exist. Its overall condition is average, or a bit better. This is not an unused, or mint flag. It has seen service. It exhibits the expected wear a cotton item such as this experiences when exposed to salt air, salt water, smoke, etc. It is a great item for any royal or naval collection.

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Description

This is an incredible standard/banner that was used on Kaiserliche Marine vessels. The banner proclaimed the presence of a Prinz of the House of Hohenzollern on board. Three Hohenzollern Princes are the most likely to have had this particular flag flown for them. The senior of the three was Großadmiral Prinz Heinrich (1862-1929). He was Kaiser Wilhelm II’s (1859-1941) younger brother. The second was Kaiser Wilhelm II’s son, Prinz Adalbert (1884-1948). The final prince was Prinz Heinrich’s son, Prinz Waldemar (1889-1945). That said, if ANY Hohenzollern Prinz were visiting a ship (even if he served in the Army), this flag would have correctly flown to honor and recognize him. The standard measures a whopping 6’ 11″(83″) x 6’ 6″(78.”) The banner’s center sports a large Hohenzollern Eagle within a shield. Below that is an important symbol of Prussian royalty, the Black Eagle Collar. [An excellent representative of the Collar resides at Haus Doorn, Kaiser Wilhelm II’s residence-in-exile, in the Netherlands. The last example I saw on the market, which had belonged to the King of Bulgaria, sold with its presentation case for more than $100,000!] Above it all sits a red and gold Hohenzollern Crown. The entire arrangement is superimposed on a large Iron Cross measuring 5′ 11″ (71″) x 6′ 6″(78.”) Two more smaller Hohenzollern Crowns appear to the right of the shield. The upper left and lower right corners feature smaller Hohenzollern Eagles. Two repair patches show in the upper and lower right corners. No tearing or rips are apparent, although substantial fading has occurred from exposure to the elements. The standard’s right side displays a lanyard and other fittings by which it can be attached to a ship’s halyard. Normally, members of the royal house only visited battleships and battle cruisers, so typically one would not see this banner on a small vessel. The flag is somewhat similar to the Kaiser’s Standard, but some differences exist. Its overall condition is average, or a bit better. This is not an unused, or mint flag. It has seen service. It exhibits the expected wear a cotton item such as this experiences when exposed to salt air, salt water, smoke, etc. It is a great item for any royal or naval collection.