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BAVARIA – EPAULETTES – REGIMENTAL COMMANDER AND OBERST – PRINZ FRANZD – INFANTERIE-REGIMENT Nr 2 – ORIGINAL STORAGE CASE

SKU: 20-226 (23)

$2,895.00

Prinz Franz (1875-1957) of Bavaria was Kronprinz Rupprecht’s (1869-1955) younger brother. Their father was König Ludwig III (1845-1921) of Bavaria. Like his older brother Prinz Rupprecht, Prinz Franz had a military career, although it was less distinguished. Both brothers commanded the 2. Infanterie-Regiment Kronprinz at different times. This very proud regiment was founded in 1682, making it one of the Bavarian Army’s two oldest Infanterie regiments. It was garrisoned in München and attached to the Bavarian I. Armeekorps. Prinz Rupprecht commanded the regiment in 1899, until he was promoted to generalmajor and assumed other responsibilities. Ultimately, Prinz Rupprecht achieved the rank of Generalfeldmarschall. I do not have the exact dates when Prinz Franz commanded the 2. Infanterie-Regiment Kronprinz. It was from before WW I to slightly before or after WW I erupted. He then was promoted to generalmajor and commanded an Infanterie brigade throughout the war. Each of the epaulettes is framed by a gilt “moon.” Its background is red (wool) felt. Mounted on the background is the regiment’s massive crowned cypher. It is so large it spills over the gilt “moon frame’s” edges. Flanking the cypher are two pips indicating an oberst’s rank. Silver ringlets hang down from the frame. This adornment was used only on a major’s, oberstleutnant’s, or oberst’s epaulettes. Whether for a lower or higher rank, all other epaulettes were significantly different. The epaulette’s “tongue” sports silver bullion tape embedded with blue, further confirming the epaulette is Bavarian. Each epaulette features a plain, gold-toned button. When one turns them over, they display the typical Bavarian washer and cotter pin securing them to the tunic. The reverse sports the same red material as is present on the obverse. These beautiful epaulettes come in their original storage case. No markings whatsoever appear for Prinz Franz either on or in the case. Inside is a pedestal on which they sit. A nifty little ribbon secures them with a little bow. I really like these epaulettes. They hail from a less well known Wittelsbach prince. When his older brother, Kronprinz Albrecht, died in 1955, Prinz Franz became the Bavarian throne’s pretender until his death in 1957. Included with the epaulettes is a copy from the Rangliste that shows Prinz Franz as oberst and commander of 2. Infanterie-Regiment Kronprinz. Interestingly, his older brother, Kronprinz Rupprecht, was the regiment’s Inhaber (its honorary oberst and patron)!

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Prinz Franz (1875-1957) of Bavaria was Kronprinz Rupprecht’s (1869-1955) younger brother. Their father was König Ludwig III (1845-1921) of Bavaria. Like his older brother Prinz Rupprecht, Prinz Franz had a military career, although it was less distinguished. Both brothers commanded the 2. Infanterie-Regiment Kronprinz at different times. This very proud regiment was founded in 1682, making it one of the Bavarian Army’s two oldest Infanterie regiments. It was garrisoned in München and attached to the Bavarian I. Armeekorps. Prinz Rupprecht commanded the regiment in 1899, until he was promoted to generalmajor and assumed other responsibilities. Ultimately, Prinz Rupprecht achieved the rank of Generalfeldmarschall. I do not have the exact dates when Prinz Franz commanded the 2. Infanterie-Regiment Kronprinz. It was from before WW I to slightly before or after WW I erupted. He then was promoted to generalmajor and commanded an Infanterie brigade throughout the war. Each of the epaulettes is framed by a gilt “moon.” Its background is red (wool) felt. Mounted on the background is the regiment’s massive crowned cypher. It is so large it spills over the gilt “moon frame’s” edges. Flanking the cypher are two pips indicating an oberst’s rank. Silver ringlets hang down from the frame. This adornment was used only on a major’s, oberstleutnant’s, or oberst’s epaulettes. Whether for a lower or higher rank, all other epaulettes were significantly different. The epaulette’s “tongue” sports silver bullion tape embedded with blue, further confirming the epaulette is Bavarian. Each epaulette features a plain, gold-toned button. When one turns them over, they display the typical Bavarian washer and cotter pin securing them to the tunic. The reverse sports the same red material as is present on the obverse. These beautiful epaulettes come in their original storage case. No markings whatsoever appear for Prinz Franz either on or in the case. Inside is a pedestal on which they sit. A nifty little ribbon secures them with a little bow. I really like these epaulettes. They hail from a less well known Wittelsbach prince. When his older brother, Kronprinz Albrecht, died in 1955, Prinz Franz became the Bavarian throne’s pretender until his death in 1957. Included with the epaulettes is a copy from the Rangliste that shows Prinz Franz as oberst and commander of 2. Infanterie-Regiment Kronprinz. Interestingly, his older brother, Kronprinz Rupprecht, was the regiment’s Inhaber (its honorary oberst and patron)!

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Prinz Franz (1875-1957) of Bavaria was Kronprinz Rupprecht’s (1869-1955) younger brother. Their father was König Ludwig III (1845-1921) of Bavaria. Like his older brother Prinz Rupprecht, Prinz Franz had a military career, although it was less distinguished. Both brothers commanded the 2. Infanterie-Regiment Kronprinz at different times. This very proud regiment was founded in 1682, making it one of the Bavarian Army’s two oldest Infanterie regiments. It was garrisoned in München and attached to the Bavarian I. Armeekorps. Prinz Rupprecht commanded the regiment in 1899, until he was promoted to generalmajor and assumed other responsibilities. Ultimately, Prinz Rupprecht achieved the rank of Generalfeldmarschall. I do not have the exact dates when Prinz Franz commanded the 2. Infanterie-Regiment Kronprinz. It was from before WW I to slightly before or after WW I erupted. He then was promoted to generalmajor and commanded an Infanterie brigade throughout the war. Each of the epaulettes is framed by a gilt “moon.” Its background is red (wool) felt. Mounted on the background is the regiment’s massive crowned cypher. It is so large it spills over the gilt “moon frame’s” edges. Flanking the cypher are two pips indicating an oberst’s rank. Silver ringlets hang down from the frame. This adornment was used only on a major’s, oberstleutnant’s, or oberst’s epaulettes. Whether for a lower or higher rank, all other epaulettes were significantly different. The epaulette’s “tongue” sports silver bullion tape embedded with blue, further confirming the epaulette is Bavarian. Each epaulette features a plain, gold-toned button. When one turns them over, they display the typical Bavarian washer and cotter pin securing them to the tunic. The reverse sports the same red material as is present on the obverse. These beautiful epaulettes come in their original storage case. No markings whatsoever appear for Prinz Franz either on or in the case. Inside is a pedestal on which they sit. A nifty little ribbon secures them with a little bow. I really like these epaulettes. They hail from a less well known Wittelsbach prince. When his older brother, Kronprinz Albrecht, died in 1955, Prinz Franz became the Bavarian throne’s pretender until his death in 1957. Included with the epaulettes is a copy from the Rangliste that shows Prinz Franz as oberst and commander of 2. Infanterie-Regiment Kronprinz. Interestingly, his older brother, Kronprinz Rupprecht, was the regiment’s Inhaber (its honorary oberst and patron)!

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