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PRE WW I SEE-BATAILLON OFFICER’S SCHIRMÜTZE

SKU: 33-277

$3,495.00

Today, we are offering a very rare schirmütze. Not only is it rare, but it is in amazing condition. The See-Bataillon was a relatively small, elite force. It was formed in 1852 to fill the same role as the British Royal Marines and the United States Marine Corps, i.e., acting as a shipboard security force. Historically, (for example, on British ships during 1805’s Battle of Trafalgar) Marines were tasked with positioning themselves in the ship’s rigging and raining fire down on the opposing vessel’s sailors. If the action involved ship-to-ship fighting, they were the first wave, leading their fellow sailors. (Naval warfare eventually evolved so that ships faced off from great distances and simply lobbed shells at one another). Marines also enforced security onboard ship, such as standing guard at the ship captain’s door. In addition, the U.S. Marines and the See-Bataillon provided security forces for overseas embassies and legations. [The latter became especially important for Germany as she began an overseas expansion under Kaiser Wilhelm II, against Chancellor Otto von Bismarck’s wishes. (Von Bismarck was sacked two years after Wilhelm II assumed the throne)].
Thus, the See-Bataillon grew in importance. In 1886, two years before Kaiser Wilhelm I’s death, the entire See-Bataillon comprised a mere two half-Bataillone based in Wilhelmshaven and Kiel, Germany’s two naval bases. Soon after Wilhelm II’s 1889 ascension to the German throne, the half-Bataillone were elevated to full Bataillon status. See-Bataillon Nr I was established in Kiel, while See-Bataillon Nr II was garrisoned at Wilhelmshaven. With German expansion finally well underway in 1897, See-Bataillon Nr III was posted to China, and contingents were based at Tsingtao and Kiautschou to protect German interests. [Men from See-Bataillon Nr III were fully involved in the 1900-1901 Boxer Rebellion].
By the time WW I began, additional See-Bataillone (at least three) were established for use in Belgium, particularly in Flanders. In time, these men and their supporting artillery became known as Marine-Infanterie. Marine-Infanterie eventually expanded to include multiple Marine-Divisions. These troops (who never saw a ship) fought in Flanders as sailors in the trenches along with their army brothers.
Today’s offering is a pre WW I, pre feldgrau officer’s schirmütze. The visor cap’s primary color is dark-blue. It sports a wide white trim band that measures approximately 1 ½”in height. Two very narrow white piping bands also encircle the cap. The first sits directly above the wide white band, while the other is at the cap’s top. The schirmütze sports a single Reich’s kokarde in the wide white trim band’s center. [The See-Bataillon, like the Kaiserliche Marine itself, was a national unit. It was NOT composed of contingents from the various German states, so its caps lacked states’ kokarden ]. A fine black leather visor completes the exterior.
The interior features an ultra-high-quality leather sweatband. Embossed on the sweatband are the words “Elegant Style,” with what appears to be a stylized wagon or cart. The large front wheel encloses a daisy, while the smaller back wheel encloses the word “Style.” “Elegant” sports an oversized “E” emblazoned behind the front wheel. The wagon is carrying what looks like a load of holly leaves and berries. The schirmütze has a watermarked, white silk liner. While no owner’s identification is present, a white silk liner is often an indication of either royalty or nobility.
This fine schirmütze’s condition is near mint. I see one small moth nip toward the cap’s rear blue portion. It is so small that I went over the cap three times before I found it. I would say that it is no more than 1/16″ in diameter. It will prove impossible to upgrade, and looks as though we grabbed it through a time warp! If you are looking for the best, you need look no further.

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Today, we are offering a very rare schirmütze. Not only is it rare, but it is in amazing condition. The See-Bataillon was a relatively small, elite force. It was formed in 1852 to fill the same role as the British Royal Marines and the United States Marine Corps, i.e., acting as a shipboard security force. Historically, (for example, on British ships during 1805’s Battle of Trafalgar) Marines were tasked with positioning themselves in the ship’s rigging and raining fire down on the opposing vessel’s sailors. If the action involved ship-to-ship fighting, they were the first wave, leading their fellow sailors. (Naval warfare eventually evolved so that ships faced off from great distances and simply lobbed shells at one another). Marines also enforced security onboard ship, such as standing guard at the ship captain’s door. In addition, the U.S. Marines and the See-Bataillon provided security forces for overseas embassies and legations. [The latter became especially important for Germany as she began an overseas expansion under Kaiser Wilhelm II, against Chancellor Otto von Bismarck’s wishes. (Von Bismarck was sacked two years after Wilhelm II assumed the throne)].
Thus, the See-Bataillon grew in importance. In 1886, two years before Kaiser Wilhelm I’s death, the entire See-Bataillon comprised a mere two half-Bataillone based in Wilhelmshaven and Kiel, Germany’s two naval bases. Soon after Wilhelm II’s 1889 ascension to the German throne, the half-Bataillone were elevated to full Bataillon status. See-Bataillon Nr I was established in Kiel, while See-Bataillon Nr II was garrisoned at Wilhelmshaven. With German expansion finally well underway in 1897, See-Bataillon Nr III was posted to China, and contingents were based at Tsingtao and Kiautschou to protect German interests. [Men from See-Bataillon Nr III were fully involved in the 1900-1901 Boxer Rebellion].
By the time WW I began, additional See-Bataillone (at least three) were established for use in Belgium, particularly in Flanders. In time, these men and their supporting artillery became known as Marine-Infanterie. Marine-Infanterie eventually expanded to include multiple Marine-Divisions. These troops (who never saw a ship) fought in Flanders as sailors in the trenches along with their army brothers.
Today’s offering is a pre WW I, pre feldgrau officer’s schirmütze. The visor cap’s primary color is dark-blue. It sports a wide white trim band that measures approximately 1 ½”in height. Two very narrow white piping bands also encircle the cap. The first sits directly above the wide white band, while the other is at the cap’s top. The schirmütze sports a single Reich’s kokarde in the wide white trim band’s center. [The See-Bataillon, like the Kaiserliche Marine itself, was a national unit. It was NOT composed of contingents from the various German states, so its caps lacked states’ kokarden ]. A fine black leather visor completes the exterior.
The interior features an ultra-high-quality leather sweatband. Embossed on the sweatband are the words “Elegant Style,” with what appears to be a stylized wagon or cart. The large front wheel encloses a daisy, while the smaller back wheel encloses the word “Style.” “Elegant” sports an oversized “E” emblazoned behind the front wheel. The wagon is carrying what looks like a load of holly leaves and berries. The schirmütze has a watermarked, white silk liner. While no owner’s identification is present, a white silk liner is often an indication of either royalty or nobility.
This fine schirmütze’s condition is near mint. I see one small moth nip toward the cap’s rear blue portion. It is so small that I went over the cap three times before I found it. I would say that it is no more than 1/16″ in diameter. It will prove impossible to upgrade, and looks as though we grabbed it through a time warp! If you are looking for the best, you need look no further.

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Description

Today, we are offering a very rare schirmütze. Not only is it rare, but it is in amazing condition. The See-Bataillon was a relatively small, elite force. It was formed in 1852 to fill the same role as the British Royal Marines and the United States Marine Corps, i.e., acting as a shipboard security force. Historically, (for example, on British ships during 1805’s Battle of Trafalgar) Marines were tasked with positioning themselves in the ship’s rigging and raining fire down on the opposing vessel’s sailors. If the action involved ship-to-ship fighting, they were the first wave, leading their fellow sailors. (Naval warfare eventually evolved so that ships faced off from great distances and simply lobbed shells at one another). Marines also enforced security onboard ship, such as standing guard at the ship captain’s door. In addition, the U.S. Marines and the See-Bataillon provided security forces for overseas embassies and legations. [The latter became especially important for Germany as she began an overseas expansion under Kaiser Wilhelm II, against Chancellor Otto von Bismarck’s wishes. (Von Bismarck was sacked two years after Wilhelm II assumed the throne)].
Thus, the See-Bataillon grew in importance. In 1886, two years before Kaiser Wilhelm I’s death, the entire See-Bataillon comprised a mere two half-Bataillone based in Wilhelmshaven and Kiel, Germany’s two naval bases. Soon after Wilhelm II’s 1889 ascension to the German throne, the half-Bataillone were elevated to full Bataillon status. See-Bataillon Nr I was established in Kiel, while See-Bataillon Nr II was garrisoned at Wilhelmshaven. With German expansion finally well underway in 1897, See-Bataillon Nr III was posted to China, and contingents were based at Tsingtao and Kiautschou to protect German interests. [Men from See-Bataillon Nr III were fully involved in the 1900-1901 Boxer Rebellion].
By the time WW I began, additional See-Bataillone (at least three) were established for use in Belgium, particularly in Flanders. In time, these men and their supporting artillery became known as Marine-Infanterie. Marine-Infanterie eventually expanded to include multiple Marine-Divisions. These troops (who never saw a ship) fought in Flanders as sailors in the trenches along with their army brothers.
Today’s offering is a pre WW I, pre feldgrau officer’s schirmütze. The visor cap’s primary color is dark-blue. It sports a wide white trim band that measures approximately 1 ½”in height. Two very narrow white piping bands also encircle the cap. The first sits directly above the wide white band, while the other is at the cap’s top. The schirmütze sports a single Reich’s kokarde in the wide white trim band’s center. [The See-Bataillon, like the Kaiserliche Marine itself, was a national unit. It was NOT composed of contingents from the various German states, so its caps lacked states’ kokarden ]. A fine black leather visor completes the exterior.
The interior features an ultra-high-quality leather sweatband. Embossed on the sweatband are the words “Elegant Style,” with what appears to be a stylized wagon or cart. The large front wheel encloses a daisy, while the smaller back wheel encloses the word “Style.” “Elegant” sports an oversized “E” emblazoned behind the front wheel. The wagon is carrying what looks like a load of holly leaves and berries. The schirmütze has a watermarked, white silk liner. While no owner’s identification is present, a white silk liner is often an indication of either royalty or nobility.
This fine schirmütze’s condition is near mint. I see one small moth nip toward the cap’s rear blue portion. It is so small that I went over the cap three times before I found it. I would say that it is no more than 1/16″ in diameter. It will prove impossible to upgrade, and looks as though we grabbed it through a time warp! If you are looking for the best, you need look no further.