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SAXONY – KNIGHT’S CROSS – MILITARY ST. HEINRICH ORDER

SKU: 05-1707

$1,995.00

This decoration is the Ritterkreuz grade of the Kingdom of Saxony’s highest military order for bravery. [PLEASE NOTE: Within the Heinrich Order family, this “small” award was the highest that a Saxon soldier could receive.] While the Orden Pour le Mérite was the highest award given in the Reich (originally Prussia’s highest award, first-issued by Frederick the Great in the 18th Century), each German Kingdom, Grand Duchy, and Duchy had its own top decoration, which was most often reserved for that state’s native sons. Such was the case with the Kingdom of Saxony, so it was common for an officer who received one award to also receive the other. This award was reserved for officers ONLY. [Several states offered a different award to NCO’s or enlisted men].
The order’s cross measures 1 ½” x 2 ¼” from its bottom to the massive articulated crown’s top. The order has an extremely-detailed and interesting obverse and reverse. The obverse features a beautifully hand-painted representation of St. Heinrich at the very center. This small center area displays SIX different colors of enamel. Surrounding that is a blue and gold Latin motto. White enamel trim on a gold metal background extends out to the cross’s arms. The previously-mentioned large, articulated gold crown sits atop the cross. A jump ring at the crown’s top allows the attachment of the decoration’s ribbon.
The decoration’s reverse features Saxony’s well-known Coat-of-Arms: a black and gold enamel background featuring a diagonal green branch in its center (in the same position as St. Heinrich on the obverse). It is surrounded by a blue and gold enamel circle that features Saxony’s motto in gold against the blue enamel. The cross’s arms are connected and decorated in a manner identical to the obverse. That said, it is important to emphasize that the enamel work displays NO cracks or chips—this cross is 100% intact and unrestored. Many Heinrichs’ Ordens DO exhibit enamel problems due to the extensive enamel work comprising their design, and the fact that most were usually sandwiched between other orders on an Ordensspange. It is quite common for them to have received restoration work over the years. While acceptable, such work always affects an award’s value. This cross’s workmanship is PERFECT.
Our order is a silver-gilt example, dating from the mid-to-late-war period. It is NOT hallmarked, which was quite common. A small portion of period ribbon accompanies it.
Perhaps the most famous man to be awarded this decoration was Max Immelmann. He was, along with Oswald Boelcke, one of the first two Imperial German Air Service pilots to be awarded the Orden Pour le Mérite. He also is the person for whom the Pour le Mérite was nicknamed. [“Blue Max” sounds better than the “Blue Oswald,” doesn’t it? Manfred von Richthofen did not receive his PLM award until the following year, and the “Blue Manfred” just doesn’t have the same ring]!
The decoration is in excellent condition with no enamel damage. It is a beautiful piece.

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This decoration is the Ritterkreuz grade of the Kingdom of Saxony’s highest military order for bravery. [PLEASE NOTE: Within the Heinrich Order family, this “small” award was the highest that a Saxon soldier could receive.] While the Orden Pour le Mérite was the highest award given in the Reich (originally Prussia’s highest award, first-issued by Frederick the Great in the 18th Century), each German Kingdom, Grand Duchy, and Duchy had its own top decoration, which was most often reserved for that state’s native sons. Such was the case with the Kingdom of Saxony, so it was common for an officer who received one award to also receive the other. This award was reserved for officers ONLY. [Several states offered a different award to NCO’s or enlisted men].
The order’s cross measures 1 ½” x 2 ¼” from its bottom to the massive articulated crown’s top. The order has an extremely-detailed and interesting obverse and reverse. The obverse features a beautifully hand-painted representation of St. Heinrich at the very center. This small center area displays SIX different colors of enamel. Surrounding that is a blue and gold Latin motto. White enamel trim on a gold metal background extends out to the cross’s arms. The previously-mentioned large, articulated gold crown sits atop the cross. A jump ring at the crown’s top allows the attachment of the decoration’s ribbon.
The decoration’s reverse features Saxony’s well-known Coat-of-Arms: a black and gold enamel background featuring a diagonal green branch in its center (in the same position as St. Heinrich on the obverse). It is surrounded by a blue and gold enamel circle that features Saxony’s motto in gold against the blue enamel. The cross’s arms are connected and decorated in a manner identical to the obverse. That said, it is important to emphasize that the enamel work displays NO cracks or chips—this cross is 100% intact and unrestored. Many Heinrichs’ Ordens DO exhibit enamel problems due to the extensive enamel work comprising their design, and the fact that most were usually sandwiched between other orders on an Ordensspange. It is quite common for them to have received restoration work over the years. While acceptable, such work always affects an award’s value. This cross’s workmanship is PERFECT.
Our order is a silver-gilt example, dating from the mid-to-late-war period. It is NOT hallmarked, which was quite common. A small portion of period ribbon accompanies it.
Perhaps the most famous man to be awarded this decoration was Max Immelmann. He was, along with Oswald Boelcke, one of the first two Imperial German Air Service pilots to be awarded the Orden Pour le Mérite. He also is the person for whom the Pour le Mérite was nicknamed. [“Blue Max” sounds better than the “Blue Oswald,” doesn’t it? Manfred von Richthofen did not receive his PLM award until the following year, and the “Blue Manfred” just doesn’t have the same ring]!
The decoration is in excellent condition with no enamel damage. It is a beautiful piece.

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Description

This decoration is the Ritterkreuz grade of the Kingdom of Saxony’s highest military order for bravery. [PLEASE NOTE: Within the Heinrich Order family, this “small” award was the highest that a Saxon soldier could receive.] While the Orden Pour le Mérite was the highest award given in the Reich (originally Prussia’s highest award, first-issued by Frederick the Great in the 18th Century), each German Kingdom, Grand Duchy, and Duchy had its own top decoration, which was most often reserved for that state’s native sons. Such was the case with the Kingdom of Saxony, so it was common for an officer who received one award to also receive the other. This award was reserved for officers ONLY. [Several states offered a different award to NCO’s or enlisted men].
The order’s cross measures 1 ½” x 2 ¼” from its bottom to the massive articulated crown’s top. The order has an extremely-detailed and interesting obverse and reverse. The obverse features a beautifully hand-painted representation of St. Heinrich at the very center. This small center area displays SIX different colors of enamel. Surrounding that is a blue and gold Latin motto. White enamel trim on a gold metal background extends out to the cross’s arms. The previously-mentioned large, articulated gold crown sits atop the cross. A jump ring at the crown’s top allows the attachment of the decoration’s ribbon.
The decoration’s reverse features Saxony’s well-known Coat-of-Arms: a black and gold enamel background featuring a diagonal green branch in its center (in the same position as St. Heinrich on the obverse). It is surrounded by a blue and gold enamel circle that features Saxony’s motto in gold against the blue enamel. The cross’s arms are connected and decorated in a manner identical to the obverse. That said, it is important to emphasize that the enamel work displays NO cracks or chips—this cross is 100% intact and unrestored. Many Heinrichs’ Ordens DO exhibit enamel problems due to the extensive enamel work comprising their design, and the fact that most were usually sandwiched between other orders on an Ordensspange. It is quite common for them to have received restoration work over the years. While acceptable, such work always affects an award’s value. This cross’s workmanship is PERFECT.
Our order is a silver-gilt example, dating from the mid-to-late-war period. It is NOT hallmarked, which was quite common. A small portion of period ribbon accompanies it.
Perhaps the most famous man to be awarded this decoration was Max Immelmann. He was, along with Oswald Boelcke, one of the first two Imperial German Air Service pilots to be awarded the Orden Pour le Mérite. He also is the person for whom the Pour le Mérite was nicknamed. [“Blue Max” sounds better than the “Blue Oswald,” doesn’t it? Manfred von Richthofen did not receive his PLM award until the following year, and the “Blue Manfred” just doesn’t have the same ring]!
The decoration is in excellent condition with no enamel damage. It is a beautiful piece.