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TRENCH ART ARTILLERY SHELL

SKU: 10-850

$150.00

Today we are offering a most interesting trench art artillery shell. Trench art was created by soldiers from all WW I’s armies when they had extra time on their hands in the trenches between battles. They took bits and pieces of gear and fashioned them into artistic objects. Some common examples were belt buckles converted into match safes, as well as jewelry and letter openers fashioned from shrapnel shards. These often-bored soldiers showed amazing creativity. A great deal of trench art also was created in hospitals as therapy for soldiers recovering from mild to severe wounds. A wide variety of items were produced, from small, easily carried pieces to elaborately tooled artillery shells. The latter were converted to vases, ashtrays, or umbrella stands, depending on the shell’s size.
Artillery shells that had been converted from their original use to vases were quite popular in Germany. Today’s 8cm M5 shell stands 10 ½” tall. It measures 4 ½” in diameter at the lip, and 3 1/4″ in diameter at the base. The vase’s top third has been elaborately stippled with dark vertical marks “growing” from a base of tapped-in round spots. Its lip has been carefully crimped around its entire circumference, giving it a stylized “burst” appearance. Another section of the tapped-in spots is surrounded by etched-in bands a third of the way up from the base, which is also decorated with simple bands. The shell casing’s base sports various arsenal marks, such as “1916,” “Berndorf,” 525, and “8cm M5.” It has suffered a few dents and dings over the years, but remains in good condition, overall.

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Today we are offering a most interesting trench art artillery shell. Trench art was created by soldiers from all WW I’s armies when they had extra time on their hands in the trenches between battles. They took bits and pieces of gear and fashioned them into artistic objects. Some common examples were belt buckles converted into match safes, as well as jewelry and letter openers fashioned from shrapnel shards. These often-bored soldiers showed amazing creativity. A great deal of trench art also was created in hospitals as therapy for soldiers recovering from mild to severe wounds. A wide variety of items were produced, from small, easily carried pieces to elaborately tooled artillery shells. The latter were converted to vases, ashtrays, or umbrella stands, depending on the shell’s size.
Artillery shells that had been converted from their original use to vases were quite popular in Germany. Today’s 8cm M5 shell stands 10 ½” tall. It measures 4 ½” in diameter at the lip, and 3 1/4″ in diameter at the base. The vase’s top third has been elaborately stippled with dark vertical marks “growing” from a base of tapped-in round spots. Its lip has been carefully crimped around its entire circumference, giving it a stylized “burst” appearance. Another section of the tapped-in spots is surrounded by etched-in bands a third of the way up from the base, which is also decorated with simple bands. The shell casing’s base sports various arsenal marks, such as “1916,” “Berndorf,” 525, and “8cm M5.” It has suffered a few dents and dings over the years, but remains in good condition, overall.

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Description

Today we are offering a most interesting trench art artillery shell. Trench art was created by soldiers from all WW I’s armies when they had extra time on their hands in the trenches between battles. They took bits and pieces of gear and fashioned them into artistic objects. Some common examples were belt buckles converted into match safes, as well as jewelry and letter openers fashioned from shrapnel shards. These often-bored soldiers showed amazing creativity. A great deal of trench art also was created in hospitals as therapy for soldiers recovering from mild to severe wounds. A wide variety of items were produced, from small, easily carried pieces to elaborately tooled artillery shells. The latter were converted to vases, ashtrays, or umbrella stands, depending on the shell’s size.
Artillery shells that had been converted from their original use to vases were quite popular in Germany. Today’s 8cm M5 shell stands 10 ½” tall. It measures 4 ½” in diameter at the lip, and 3 1/4″ in diameter at the base. The vase’s top third has been elaborately stippled with dark vertical marks “growing” from a base of tapped-in round spots. Its lip has been carefully crimped around its entire circumference, giving it a stylized “burst” appearance. Another section of the tapped-in spots is surrounded by etched-in bands a third of the way up from the base, which is also decorated with simple bands. The shell casing’s base sports various arsenal marks, such as “1916,” “Berndorf,” 525, and “8cm M5.” It has suffered a few dents and dings over the years, but remains in good condition, overall.