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PRUSSIA – STORAGE BOX – KAISERLICHER YACHT CLUB PRIZE PLAQUES

SKU: 03-97 XES

$895.00

This handsome wooden box measures 11″ x 2 3/4 x 1 3/4.” It is completely covered on three sides with small brass Kaiserliche Yacht Club Prize Plaques that each measure 1 1/4″ x 2 3/4.” Its bottom is covered by dark green felt. One of the plaques on the box’s end is blank. The others are all inscribed for first place and special prizes from 1909 through 1912. No names are written, just the names of the events and their dates. The box swings open on special brass hinges, which are rather elaborate (please note the accompanying pictures). The inside of the box is all wood. We do not know its exact utility, although pencils and pens would fit quite well inside……

Height: 1.75in
Width: 2.75in
Length: 11in

STORAGE BOX – KAISERLICHER YACHT CLUB PRIZE PLAQUES

The Kaiserliche Yacht Club was one of the forerunners of the Kiel Yacht Club. Known also as “Küz” from its acronym KYC, it was a prestigious yacht club located in the harbor city of Kiel, Germany. German Emperor Wilhelm II, his younger brother Prince Heinrich of Prussia, and Alfred Krupp were among its members. The club was famous for the sailing events it organized, including its role in the first Kieler Woche regattas, an event that still takes place yearly in the Kiel Bay. (It is the largest sailing event in the world). The club’s origins are in the “Marine-Regatta-Verein” (Regatta Union of the Navy), a club for Kaiserliche Marine officers founded in Kiel in 1887. The Marine-Regatta-Verein specialized in yacht racing. Prince Heinrich of Prussia, a yachting enthusiast, was its patron. In 1891 the club allowed civilians in and Emperor Wilhelm II became its commodore, bringing his own yacht Meteor I (the former Thistle) to the club’s marina in Kiel. That same year the club changed its name to “Kaiserlicher Yacht Club.” At the time of World War I the club house was transformed into a Lazaretto (a quarantine station for maritime travelers). Four hundred fifty-five members of the Kaiserlicher Yacht Club died in the war.

After these difficult years the club almost went bankrupt. It barely managed to survive. The Kaiserlicher Yacht Club retained its name even after the Treaty of Versailles that brought the German monarchy to an end. William II remained as honorary commodore of the club, while he lived in exile at Haus Doorn, in the Netherlands. His patronage was ended when the Nazis came to power and took over the club, doing away with its Imperial name. It resurfaced after WW II and was renamed the Kiel Yacht Club.

This handsome wooden box measures 11″ x 2 3/4 x 1 3/4.” It is completely covered on three sides with small brass Kaiserliche Yacht Club Prize Plaques that each measure 1 1/4″ x 2 3/4.” Its bottom is covered by dark green felt. One of the plaques on the box’s end is blank. The others are all inscribed for first place and special prizes from 1909 through 1912. No names are written, just the names of the events and their dates. The box swings open on special brass hinges, which are rather elaborate (please note the accompanying pictures). The inside of the box is all wood. We do not know its exact utility, although pencils and pens would fit quite well inside.

This is a consignment item.

In stock


Description

STORAGE BOX – KAISERLICHER YACHT CLUB PRIZE PLAQUES

The Kaiserliche Yacht Club was one of the forerunners of the Kiel Yacht Club. Known also as “Küz” from its acronym KYC, it was a prestigious yacht club located in the harbor city of Kiel, Germany. German Emperor Wilhelm II, his younger brother Prince Heinrich of Prussia, and Alfred Krupp were among its members. The club was famous for the sailing events it organized, including its role in the first Kieler Woche regattas, an event that still takes place yearly in the Kiel Bay. (It is the largest sailing event in the world). The club’s origins are in the “Marine-Regatta-Verein” (Regatta Union of the Navy), a club for Kaiserliche Marine officers founded in Kiel in 1887. The Marine-Regatta-Verein specialized in yacht racing. Prince Heinrich of Prussia, a yachting enthusiast, was its patron. In 1891 the club allowed civilians in and Emperor Wilhelm II became its commodore, bringing his own yacht Meteor I (the former Thistle) to the club’s marina in Kiel. That same year the club changed its name to “Kaiserlicher Yacht Club.” At the time of World War I the club house was transformed into a Lazaretto (a quarantine station for maritime travelers). Four hundred fifty-five members of the Kaiserlicher Yacht Club died in the war.

After these difficult years the club almost went bankrupt. It barely managed to survive. The Kaiserlicher Yacht Club retained its name even after the Treaty of Versailles that brought the German monarchy to an end. William II remained as honorary commodore of the club, while he lived in exile at Haus Doorn, in the Netherlands. His patronage was ended when the Nazis came to power and took over the club, doing away with its Imperial name. It resurfaced after WW II and was renamed the Kiel Yacht Club.

This handsome wooden box measures 11″ x 2 3/4 x 1 3/4.” It is completely covered on three sides with small brass Kaiserliche Yacht Club Prize Plaques that each measure 1 1/4″ x 2 3/4.” Its bottom is covered by dark green felt. One of the plaques on the box’s end is blank. The others are all inscribed for first place and special prizes from 1909 through 1912. No names are written, just the names of the events and their dates. The box swings open on special brass hinges, which are rather elaborate (please note the accompanying pictures). The inside of the box is all wood. We do not know its exact utility, although pencils and pens would fit quite well inside.

This is a consignment item.

Additional information

Dimensions 11 × 2.75 × 1.75 in
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