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    Prussia – Mitre – NCO – Museum Copy – Palace Guard – Russian Style – Silver Plate

    SKU: 33-365 XJT

    $2,250.00

    For gala events, the Preußische Garde Unteroffizier Kompagnie’s NCO’s wore Grenadiermützen like those worn by the Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß’s (EGRzuFUß) Bataillone Nrs I & II. Just like the EGRzuFUß, this Preußische Garde Unteroffizier Kompagnie’s Mitre displays a front shield made of silver-plated sheet-metal that bears a high-relief Order of the Black Eagle beneath a large crown. The metal shield is backed with black cloth, while the Mitre’s cloth body is red with three white strips running from its top down to its headband. The white cloth border/headband around the Mitre’s base features three flaming silver grenades. One is positioned on either side to fasten the correct, arched, brass, chin scales to the Mitre, while the third one appears at the Mitre’s rear. The top device, or Puschel, is a leather knob covered with white colored wool that sports a black center like that worn on the pre-1894 EGRzuFUß’ Mitres. No kokarden are worn on the Mitre. The Mitre’s interior is similar to a pickelhaube’s interior, featuring a leather headband with leather petals. Each petal contains a hole through which a leather string was threaded and tied in order to adjust the fit for each wearer……

     

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    PRUSSIA – MITRE – OFFICER – KAISER ALEXANDER GARDE-GRENADIER-REGIMENT NR 1

    SKU: 33-357 XRH

    $12,796.00

    MITRE – OFFICER – KAISER ALEXANDER GARDE-GRENADIER-REGIMENT NR 1

    This is a Kaiser Alexander Garde-Grenadier -Regiment Nr 1 officer’s Mitre. The regiment included both Grenadier and Füsilier Bataillone. The Mitre is for the Grenadier Bataillon. The Mitre was an ultra-high form of headdress used by only two regiments in post 1897 Germany. The first was the incredibly famous 1. Garde-Regiment zu Fuß. The other was Kaiser Alexander Garde-Grenadier-Regiment Nr 1. The latter regiment was founded in 1814 and named for Russia’s Tsar Alexander, who was Prussia’s ally to during the Napoleonic Wars. [In fact, Alexander had presented a special black Küraß to the Regiment der Garde du Corps’ officers and men as a thank-you gift. In the years after the Napoleonic Wars ended, the Regiment der Garde du Corps wore their black küraßes ONLY during their annual spring parade]. Kaiser Alexander Garde-Grenadier -Regiment Nr 1 was garrisoned in Berlin. Like all Garde-Regiments, it was attached to the prestigious Gardekorps. The Mitre was a holdover from Napoleonic and pre Napoleonic times dating back to Friedrich der Große.

    Most Imperial German Regiments employed two forms of headdress, a parade or garrison version of a pickelhaube/kugelhelm/etc. and a schirmmütze (visor cap). The two Mitre-wearing regiments wore the aforementioned two headdress pieces in addition to their Mitres. These Mitres were reserved ONLY for very high parades or special occasions. For more ordinary parades, the two regiments reverted to their pickelhauben with parade bushes.

    The Mitre is basically a cloth piece of headdress with a massive metal front plate that serves as its wappen. The fabric portion is a combination of red and white felt that displays a substantial amount of silver bullion tape along other various sections. The gold-toned metal front plate is quite impressive. Its center boasts a large silver sunburst along with an equally large Garde Star. The latter’s multicolored enamel is flawless. It is much larger than any other Garde Star you are likely to see. The Mitre’s gold-toned chin scales are held in place by a gold-toned flaming bomb on either side of the front plate. The Mitre’s final feature is a large gold-bullion knob known as a Puschel (instead of a Feldzeichen), which features a black velvet center. A smaller bulb-like attachment at the Puschel’s base fits onto the metal rod that is inserted into the Mitre’s peak. Some mothing has affected this area.
    The Mitre’s interior features an enlisted man’s leather liner. Due to the Mitre’s construction, this type of liner made more sense than the traditional silk liner normally found in an officer’s pickelhaube. It was a matter of personal choice for its owner.
    This is lovely Mitre would make a fine addition to any collection. It is very fairly priced. It is a consignment item.

    The Grenadiermütze (Grenadier Cap) or Mitre style of headdress dates back to the 1600s and Frederick the Great. It was worn by numerous German Infanterie units throughout the 17th, 18th, 19th, and part of the 20th Centuries. The Mitre’s body was a tall cloth bag with white strips around its base and a large metal front plate. Leather pickelhauben replaced Mitres during the mid-1800s. By 1894, only three out of the hundreds of German Imperial Army Infanterie units still wore the Grenadier Mitre, and then it was only for parades or palace duty. These units were: the Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß), the Kaiser Alexander Garde Grenadier Regiment NR. 1 (KAGGR1), and the Schloß Garde Kompagnie (Palace Guard Company). It was quite an honor to have these distinctive headdresses.
    The Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß) was established on 11 August 1688 and garrisoned in Potsdam, just outside of Berlin. In 1824, its Bataillon II’s enlisted men were authorized by Allerhöchste Kabinettsorder (Supreme Cabinet Order – A.K.O.) dated 30 March 1824 to wear the very distinctive and colorful headdress known as the Grenadiermütze or Mitre for parades and special occasions. On 10 August 1824, Bataillon I’s enlisted men also were authorized to wear the Grenadiermütze. Only the enlisted members of these Bataillone wore this item for parade, while the remainder of the regiment still wore their normal day-to-day headgear with a white plume or bush for parade. The Mitre initially was reserved for enlisted men, but at parade on 26 March 1826 Bataillone I & II’s unmounted officers finally were authorized to wear the Grenadiermütze style.
    In May 1843, Bataillon III (Füsilier) finally was authorized to wear a Grenadiermütze for parade. While their Grenadiermützen were similar to the ones worn by Bataillone I & II, their Grenadiermützen bodies were shorter, possessed a slightly different shape, and the grenades around their headbands were replaced by heraldic eagles.
    In January of 1889 the 3rd and 4th Companies were honored by the addition of the “SEMPER TALIS” (Ever-Following/Always Faithful/Always the Same) bandeaux to their Mitres and leather spiked helmets. (A.K.O. dated 27 January 1889). In either the summer of that year or May of 1890 the rest of Bataillon I and the Regimental staff were also authorized to wear them. The enlisted men’s bandeaux were made from brass, while those for the officers were made of German silver and their letters were sometimes colored in with red lacquer.
    On 9 February 1894 the EGRzuFUß troops of the 1st (Leib), 5th, and 9th Kompagnien were gifted by the Kaiser with new Grenadiermützen for parades. [At that time, these mounted companies’ officers, staff and adjutants still wore pickelhauben with white plumes (or black for the Füsiliers)]. By December 1894, all EGRzuFUß Kompagnien had received the new style of Mitre.
    The EGRzuFUß’s new Grenadiermütze was patterned after one worn by Frederick der Große’s Regimental Guard (Königlich Preußisches Regiments Garde Nr. 15, from 1753 to 1786). It was made from pressed or stamped, white, sheet metal and did not have a scaled metal chin strap. Bataillone I & II’s Mitres sported red cloth trim around their front plates, red cloth bodies with three white cloth strips running from peak to base (silver bullion for the officers), and the “Semper Talis” bandeaux. [This was unusual, since only Bataillon I and the Staff were authorized to wear this banner on their helmets]. The Fusilier Bataillon had a gold cloth body with white strips and the “Pro Gloria Et Patria” (For Glory and Country) inscription on the bandeau above the eagle.
    Initially, no chin strap was worn on the new Grenadiermütze; instead, the Mitre was held in place with a leather string that tied under the chin. This method did NOT keep the Grenadiermütze in place and it frequently fell off of the soldier’s head! In 1897, flat, scaled, metal, chin straps were authorized for the Grenadiermütze. Model 1891 chin strap posts were then added to the Grenadiermütze, with the wearer using the metal chin straps from his pickelhaube on his Grenadiermütze. After parade, the chin strap was removed, and the Grenadiermütze was stored in an oil cloth cover in the regimental storeroom. [More about this oil cloth cover will appear later in this special update].
    When the EGRzuFUß received their new Grenadiermützen in 1894, they turned their old ones over to the Kaiser Alexander Guard Grenadier Regt.1 (KAGGR1). It appears that they made this transition between corresponding companies. The SEMPER TALIS bandeaux were removed, and the KAGGR1 wore their Grenadiermützen with two holes in their front plates until they were replaced due normal wear and tear.
    [For more information on these two Mitres and loads of photos, see The Grenadier Mütze of the Imperial German Army by Jim Turinetti].

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    PRUSSIA – MITRE – ONE-YEAR-VOLUNTEER – ERSTE GARDE REGIMENT ZU FUß BATAILLON NR I – FRIEDRICH der GROßE-STYLE

    SKU: 33-362 XJT

    $3,420.00

    This is a privately-purchased, One-Year-Volunteer (OYV) or NCO’s Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß Bataillon Nr I or II Mitre. It boasts the “Semper Talis” bandeau on its ornate silver front plate. The cloth back is red with ornate white strips for trim. The Mitre’s interior features a wide leather sweatband with a two-piece, red, cloth liner. Its white cotton yarn Puschel displays a black center. No holes or stains mar its red wool body. This is a beautiful Mitre that was worn by two Bataillone of one Regiment, or just 0.2% of the Imperial German Army……

     

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    PRUSSIA – MITRE – RUSSIAN-STYLE – ENLISTED MAN – ERSTE GARDE REGIMENT ZU FUß BATAILLON NR I

    SKU: 33-358 XJT

    $3,690.00

    Our offering today is an Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß) Battalion Nr 1 Russian-style enlisted men’s Mitre. Its metal front shield is made of brass plated sheet metal and bears a relief Order of the Black Eagle beneath a large crown. A bandeau inscribed with the words “SEMPER TALIS” sits above the crown. The metal shield is backed with dark-blue cloth for Bataillone I & II. The Mitre’s cloth body is red with three white strips extending from its top to the headband. The white cloth border/headband around the Mitre’s base features three flaming, brass grenades for Bataillone I & II. One is positioned on either side to fasten the correct arched, brass, chin scales to the Mitre, while the third one appears at the Mitre’s rear. [PLEASE NOTE: the Infanterie’s scaled metal pickelhauben chin straps were flat, NOT arched]. The top device, known as the Puschel, is a leather knob covered with white wool that sports a black center. No kokarden are worn on the Mitre……

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    PRUSSIA – MITRE – RUSSIAN-STYLE – ENLISTED MAN – ERSTE GARDE REGIMENT ZU FUß BATAILLON NR I – KAISER ALEXANDER GARDE GRENADIER REGIMENT NR. 1

    SKU: 33-360 XJT

    $4,050.00

    This Mitre was originally issued to a soldier in the Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß) Bataillon Nr I, and then was passed along to a soldier in the Kaiser Alexander Garde Grenadier Regiment Nr 1 Bataillon Nr I (KAGGR1) when the EGRzuFUß received their new Mitres in 1894. The SEMPER TALIS bandeaux were removed, and the KAGGR1 wore their Grenadiermützen with two holes in their front plates until they were replaced due normal wear and tear……

     

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    PRUSSIA – MITRE – RUSSIAN-STYLE – ENLISTED MAN – MUSEUM COPY – EGRzuFUß BATAILLON NR I

    SKU: 33-361 XJT

    $2,250.00

    This beautiful museum copy of an important and VERY rare Mitre, an Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß) Battalion Nr 1 Russian-style enlisted men’s Mitre, was made some time after the WW I. The craftsmanship in creating it is comparable to that of the original Mitres, and is very difficult to identify as a copy, even to an expert (such is the mark of EXCELLENT workmanship)! An original of this Mitre would cost THOUSANDS of dollars more……

     

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    PRUSSIA – PICKELHAUBE – LINE-OFFICER – PIONIER-BATAILLON

    SKU: 04-621

    $3,436.00

    This is a first-rate Prussian Pionier (Engineer) Line-Bataillon officer’s pickelhaube. The helmet would be correct for Bataillon Nr’s 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 20, or 30. [Prussian Bataillon Nr’s 1, 3, and 10 displayed a slightly different wappen]. (One Garde-Pionier-Bataillon also existed). For those of you unfamiliar with the term “Pionier,” these men were the German Army’s engineers. Their primary function was building bridges and other forms of military construction. Inquiring minds want to know, “How does one distinguish a Pionier Pickelhaube from, say, an Infanterie Pickelhaube?”

    That is an excellent question! To answer, one starts with a rounded front visor, the same as that found on an Infanterie helmet. Next, the wappen, cruciform, trim, and the spike are silver-toned. The chin scales (they are flat, as are Infanterie scales) and officer’s stars are gilt. An Infanterie Pickelhaube has all gilt furniture. So, the silver wappen, spike, and trim are major giveaways. We can safely identify our helmet as belonging to a engineer rather than an infantryman. I want to point out that the helmet’s condition is exceptional. Its leather body is just gorgeous. All of the furniture, whether silver or gilt, is magnificent. As a matter of fact, pay special attention to the wappen and the hardware’s other silver pieces. All have a marvelous patina. The toning is first-rate. The correct Prussian and Reich’s kokarden are present. The helmet has been well cared for by its previous owners. The next owner of such a piece of history has an obligation to continue the same care in displaying and owning this pickelhaube. Its interior is equally pristine. It sports a fine leather sweatband and a complete light-brown or tan silk liner. Under the liner, we can see that the helmet is marked a size “56.” We can also see that all the original hardware is correct and properly in place.

    Overall, this spiked helmet is 100% original and in superb condition. Finding a PIONIER helmet in such pristine condition is not easy, since far fewer Pionier Bataillons existed than did Infanterie regiments.

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    Prussia – Pickelhaube / Spiked Helmet – General

    SKU: 04-771 XJT

    $7,200.00

    This is a fine Prussian General’s Pickelhaube that provides an intriguing contrast to the Prussian General à la Suite helmet also offered in this update. The helmet has great eye appeal, with a leather body (skull) that is in good condition, overall. It has a squared front visor rather than a rounded one, as is correct for a General Officer. One area on the right rear section does display some leather-loss. It is actually more of a crack that reveals the material underneath the leather. Another one to one and a half-inch spot appears on the opposite side. Some settling of the crown has occurred at the point where the cruciform is attached, which is a frequent occurrence on helmets that sport large cruciforms……

     

     

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    Prussia – Pickelhaube / Spiked Helmet – General – Full Parade Configuration

    SKU: 04-719 XRH

    $11,996.00

    Prussian Army General Officer, most likely a General der Infanterie. One thing about a spiked helmet such as this, any rank of General from Generalmajor to Generalfeldmarschall would have worn this helmet. What I find particularly exciting about this helmet is that it not only comes with its daily service spike, but the full trichter with its parade feathers for a parade/formal setting. Most of the time we find helmets with one of these two components, not both….

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    PRUSSIA – PICKELHAUBE / SPIKED HELMET – GENERAL Á LA SUITE – ORIGINAL TRANSPORT CASE

    SKU: 04-849

    $12,395.00

    The rank of General á la Suite was a most interesting position. In the German military there were two types of General….

     

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    Prussia – Pickelhaube / Spiked Helmet – General À LA Suite or Flugeladjutant

    SKU: 04-770 XKGJT

    $7,645.50

    This is a very fine Prussian General à la Suite or Flügeladjutant’s pickelhaube. The role of the Imperial German Army General à la Suite was an interesting one. Officers of this type were typically royals or nobles who did NOT have a direct field command. Instead, they were appointed to the à la Suite group based on their birth rather than their military ability. In addition to being more of an honorary officer, they often served their sovereign as a Flügeladjutant. In the Prussian Army, a line or serving General Offizier wore a helmet that had all-gilt furniture, as well as a squared, front visor. The à la Suite General’s had all-silver furniture, with the exception of its gilt-toned officers’ stars……

     

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  • Sale!  PRUSSIA - PICKELHAUBE / SPIKED HELMET - OFFICER - GRENADIER-REGIMENT NR 1

    Prussia – Pickelhaube / Spiked Helmet – Officer – Grenadier Rgt NR 1

    SKU: 04-827 XKGJT

    $4,150.00

    This is a fine officer pickelhaube from Grenadier-Regiment Kronprinz (1. Ostpreußisches ) Nr 1. This elite regiment was founded in 1655 and was garrisoned at Königsberg i. Pr and was attached to the Prussian I. Armeekorp.
    The front plate (wappen) on this helmet is a variation of the basic wide winged Grenadier eagle with the addition of the historic banner “1655” on the hips of the Grenadier Eagle to commemorate the founding of Grenadier Regiment Nr 1 on 20 December 1655. The “1655” banner was first authorized for Grenadier-Regiment Nr 1 for the Heraldic Eagle (small winged eagle) by AKO on 6 Nov 1888. When the eagle was changed to the Grenadier Eagle on 6 May 1900, the outstanding mention banner was moved from above the eagle’s head to the eagle’s hips. The eagle is found in only one size and was worn with a Reich and a Prussian Kockarde….

     

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